Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3795267 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 5, 1974
Filing dateAug 1, 1972
Priority dateJan 28, 1970
Publication numberUS 3795267 A, US 3795267A, US-A-3795267, US3795267 A, US3795267A
InventorsDebs V
Original AssigneeLevolor Lorentzen Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Venetian blind
US 3795267 A
Abstract
The head of the Venetian blind is attached to the soffit or lintel of window framing. At least one of the jambs affords a vertical passageway which is separated from the window opening by a jamb wall. A cord-guide fitting, which is part of the Venetian blind head, projects through an entrance in the jamb wall and guides the tilt and lift cords into the vertical passageway at an upper level. The tilt and lift cords extend downwardly in the vertical passageway and are operatively connected to a jamb-mounted cord-operating unit at a lower level.
Images(6)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Toth 160/176 United States Patent 1 1 1111 3,795,267

Debs l l Mar. 5, 1974 VENETIAN BLIND 1 3,703,920 11/1972 0065...; 160/168 [75] Inventor: Victor Debs, Staten Island, NY.

1 1 Primary ExaminerPeter M. Caun [73] Asslgnee' h j Lorentz, Hoboken, Attorney, Agent, or Firm--Charles F. Chisholm [2]] Appl' 277022 The head of the Venetian blind is attached to the sof- Related'US. Application Data fit o'r lintel of window framing. At least one of the [63] continuatiomimpart No 6,395 Jan 28 jambs affords a vertical'passageway which is separated 1970, Pat No 3,703,920 from the window opening by a jamb wall. A cordguide fitting, which is part of the Venetian blind head, 52 US. Cl. 160/168, 160/107 Projects through enhance the l Wall and 51 1111. c1. F06b 9/30 guides the tilt and lift Cords into the Vertical P 58 Field of Search 160/107, 166-178 Way at an pp level- The tilt and lift cords extend v downwardly in the vertical passageway and are opera- 5 References Cited tively connected to a jamb-mounted cord-operating IUMTED STATES PATENTS unit at a lower level. 3,443,624 5/1969 2] Claims, 24 Drawing Figures SHEET 1 BF 6 PATENTED 74 PATENTEU 5 74 VENETIAN BLIND RELATED APPLICATIONS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Although Venetian blinds are now highly developed, the cost of various components has been higher than is desirable, and the space required for the more reliable and durable blinds has been great-er than is desirable. Also most Venetian blinds, and particularly the more reliable and satisfactory ones, have not been well adapted for being combined with windows having metal framing, particularly when these windows were double glazed and it was desired to locate the ladderand-slat assembly of the blind between the glazings. In various instances only very limited space is available for installation of a Venetian blind. The prior Venetian blind constructions and arrangements that have been for use in severely limited space have been constructions and arrangements which leftmuch to be desired as regards speed and ease of assembly and installation and also as regards reliability and durability after installation.

Summary of the Invention sence of a blind or curtain, is adapted to pass light.-

The Venetian blind of the present invention can be manufactured and'installed at low cost, having in mind the reliability and operating characteristics that the blind affords. Moreover the blind ofthe present invention .can be installed readily in a-window having fabricated metal framing, the ladder-and-slat assembly of the blind being placed between the glazings if the window has double glazing.

Among the features and aspects afforded by the presently preferred forms of the invention, taken collectively, are: The head of the Venetian blind has a cordguide fitting which is adapted for entry into a vertical passageway that is afforded by .a jamb channel of the window framing, for so guiding the: tilt and lift'cords that they will hang down in such vertical passageway; the down-hanging lift cords pass around a pulley and back up to the head, having their ends secured to the head, the pulley being rotatable in a movable pulley frame, and a cord extending downwardly from the pulley frame for shifting the pulley vertically to raise and lower the slats of the blind; cord-operating means, including both tilt-cord-operating means and lift-cordoperating means, is located at a lower level in the jamb channel; slippage is provided at the tilt-cord-operating means upon full tilting of the slats being effected; confronting cord portions may be pulled toward each other to tighten the tilt cord; quick connection of the confronting portions after tightening the tilt cord is afforded; quick release of the confronting cord portions for readjustment, with quick reconnection after readjustment, is afforded; and the cord-operating means for the tilt and lift cords are incorporated in a jambmounted cord-operating unit that is of advantageous construction and has advantageous operating characteristics.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a top plan view, with portions broken away, of a Venetian blind in accordance with the invention. This means for manipulating the tilt and lift cords-are omitted.

FIG. 2 is a view, withportions broken away, taken generally on the line 22 of FIG. 1. The means for manipulating the tilt and lift cords are omitted.

FIG. 3 is a plan view, with portions broken away; showing a looped double-tilt-cord element with four eyelets affixed thereto as prepared for incorporation into the Venetian blind as shown in FIGS. land 2.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged cross section on the line 44 of FIG. 2, the tilt and lift cords being omitted.

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary view on the line 55 .of FIG. 4, portions of the tilt cord and portions of'the lift-cord meanslbeing indicated in dot-dash lines.

FIG. 6 is a top plan view of the lift-cord equalizer, a cord fragment being indicated in dot-dash lines.

FIG. 7 is a sectional elevation showing in vertical section a fragment of a metal channel which constitutes one of the jambs of metal window framing, leg, the framing of the sash. The plane of the section is perpendicular to the expanse of the window opening. The tilt cord of FIGS. 1 and 2 and also the lift-cord means of FIGS. 1 and 2 are shown extending downwardly in the channel and operatively'connected to a cord-operating unit which is attached to the channel.

FIG. 8 is a top plan view of the tilt-cord spoolmember, to which the tilt cord is shown connected in FIG. 7, a fragment of the tilt cord being included in FIG. 8.

FIG. 9 is an elevation looking from the left of FIG. 8, with a diagram added to indicate the manner in which the tilt cord is wound about the tilt-cord spooLmember before that spool member is put in place in the cordoperating unit.

FIG. 10 is a central longitudinal section, with parts broken away, showing a modified cord-operating unit. The plane of the section is considered to be vertical. Thepart of the unit which lies to the right of the line MM is taken unchanged from the cord-operating unit of FIG. 7. 7

FIG. 11 is a detail view, taken on the line ll-ll of FIG. 10, showing the friction disc and shaft shoulder which are contiguous to the line 11-11.

FIG. 12 (Sheet 4) is a small-scale front-elevation showing a blind of the present invention incorporated in a known double-glazed window having aluminum framing. The particular window is one that has been manufactured by Hopes Windows, Inc. of Jamestown, N.Y., being shown in that companys insert in Sweets Architectural Catalog File for 1968 (Copyright 1967),

page 7 of the insert. The cord-operating unit is the cord-operating unit of FIGS. 10 and 11; otherwise the blind is the blind of FIGS. 1-5 and 7.

FIG. 13 (Sheet 4) is a vertical section taken generally on the line l313 of FIG. 12, the outer framing of the window being omitted and the blind being shown largely diagrammatically with details omitted. The scale of FIG. 13 is much larger than the scale of FIG. 12 and, to keep FIG. 13 to a reasonable size, the major portion of the height of the structure is broken away in the center of the figure. I

FIG. 14 (Sheet 4) is a fragmentary view, to a much larger scale than FIG. 12, takengenerally on the line 14-14 of FIG. 12. The outer framing of the window is omitted. The tilt cords and the lift-cord means are omitted also.

FIG. 15 (Sheet 4) is a view similar to FIG. 14 showing a blind of the present invention incorporated in a different window that has aluminum framing also. The blind is the blind of FIGS. 15 and 7, the cordoperating unit being the unit of FIG. 7. The outer framing of the window is omitted. The tilt cords and the liftcord means are omitted also.

FIGS. 16-19 (Sheet 3) taken collectively shown, among other things, a cord-guide unit 256 which may be substituted for the cord-guide unit 156 that is shown in FIGS. 1, 2, 4, 5 and 7.

FIG. 16 is a fragmentary top plan view showing the cord-guide unit 256 incorporated in the Venetian blind of FIGS. 1-5 and 7. FIG. 16 corresponds to the righthand portion of FIG. 1 and, as in FIG. 1, the means for manipulating the tilt and lift cords are omitted.

FIG. 17 is a view, to a larger scale than FIG. 16, taken generally on the line 17-17 of FIG. 16. The full-line showing in FIG. 17 corresponds with the right-hand portion of FIG. 2 and, as in FIG. 2, the means for manipulating the tilt and lift cords are omitted. In FIG. 17 window-framing structure is indicated in phantom lines.

FIG. 18 is a vertical section showing the head channel, the cord-guide unit 256, and the tilt and lift cords, all at line 1818 of FIG. 17.

FIG. 19 is a view similar to FIG.--17. In FIG. 19 the full-line showing is lookingfrom the bottom of FIG. 16. Windowframing structure is indicated in phantom lines, this window-framing structure being different from the window-framing structure indicated in FIG. 17.

FIG. 20 is a largely diagrammatic top plan View, with portions broken away, of another Venetian blind in accordance with the invention. Various parts are in exploded relation and relevant relationships are indicated by broken lines. Omitted are certain lift and tilt cord connections between the head of the blind and the remotely located cord-operating unit; for these see FIG. 21.

FIG. 21 is a largely diagrammatic view, with portions broken away, taken generally on the line 2121 of FIG. 20, parts being in exploded relation similarly to FIG. 20.

FIG. 22 is a front view, looking out the window, of a Venetian blind installation embodying the present invention. The blind is the blind of FIGS. 20 and 21, a single quick connector being incorporated in the tilt cord and for which see FIG. 24. To reduce FIG. 22 to manageable size there are both vertical and horizontal breaks; other portions are broken away also. The ladder and slat assembly is in the window opening of the inner framing of a double glazed window, such inner framing being shown. The inner glazing, which is mounted in the inner framing, is shown also. The left half of the view is in elevation. The right half is taken generally on the line 2222 of FIG. 23.

FIG. 23 is a horizontal view of the Venetian blind installation of FIG. 22, taken generally on the line 23-23 of FIG. 22. The outer framing and' the outer glazing are indicated fragmentarily in phantom lines, such framing and glazing being omitted in FIGS. 22 and 24. The inner framing is hinged to the outer framing, and the outer framing is nested into and fills the opening in the building wall.

FIG. 24 is a sectional elevation, with parts broken away, taken generally on the line 24-24 of FIG. 23. Lessof of the vertical extent of the structure is broken out than in FIG. 22 and, therefore, the overall height of FIG. 24 is greater than the overall height of FIG. 22.

DESCRIPTION OF THE EMBODIMENTS THAT ARE PRESENTLY PREFERRED The presently preferred embodiments of the invention, taken collectively, afford all of the features and aspects set forth in the summary of the invention and additional features and aspects that will be apparent from the disclosure. Except may be otherwise indicated, the description hereinafter that is prior to the claims refers to one or more of the particular forms of the invention that are shown in the drawings; it does not necessarily refer to any other form or forms in which the invention may be embodied. The claims, however, do embrace other forms in which the invention may be embodied. The best modes thus far contemplated of carrying out the invention are disclosed. Nevertheless the disclosure is by way of illustration and example, since other specific modes are possible and it any feature or aspect that is not needed for his purpose.

Reference will now be had to FIGS. 1-9, which deal with the first Venetian blind that is disclosed. A ladderand-slat assembly is designated as a whole by and includes sheet-metal slats 141 which are supported by two string ladders each of which is designated as a whole by 142. The ladder-and-slat assembly is suspended beneath a horizontally-extending support or head that is designated as a whole by 144. The head that is shown may be considered as consisting of the sheet-steel channel and the thereto-attached units and elements which guide the tilt and lift cords.

Above the ladders 142 the head 144 has duplicate cord-guide units, each designated as a whole by 146. Space on the drawing being limited, the reference characters for the units 146 are divided between the two units to some extent. Each cord-guide unit 146 has a U-shaped sheetsteel body 147 that is nested as shown within the head channel 145, the bottom 147a of the cord-guide-unit body being against the bottom 1450 of the head channel and the sides 147/) and I47c of the cord-guide-unit body being against the sides 14512 and 1456' of the head channel. Thebottom 14711 of the body of each of the guide units 146 is attached to the bottom 145a of the head channel by three conventional metal eyelets 48, 49 and 50. These eyelets, which may be considered as part of the cord-guide unit 146, pass through the bottom 147a of the cord-guide body and also through the bottom 145a of the head channel. The eyelets 48, 49 and 50 also do cord guiding, as will be explained. A sleevelike cylindrical roller 51 is on a shaft which extends between the sides l47b and 1470 of the U-shaped cord-guide-unit body 147. To facilitate free turning of the roller 151 two annular beads 147d are pressed out from the sides l47b and 147C and loosely confront the adjacent ends of the rollers.

At its right-hand end in FIGS. 1 and 2 the head 144 has a cord-guide unit which is designated as a whole by 156; see also FIGS. 4 and 5. As viewed in FIG. 2 the cord-guide unit 156 includes a formation which is T- shaped but turned on its right side, this formation being composed of a horizontal flange 156a and a vertical flange l56b. The cord-guide unit .156 also includes a cylindrical boss 1566 which projects to the right from the vertical flange 156b as viewed in FIGS. 1, 2 and 5. The flanges 156a and 15612 and the boss 156c may be fabricated from sheet metal, may be die-cast in one piece of metal, or may be molded in one piece of suitable plastic. The cord-guide unit 156 also includes one or more eyelets or tubular rivets 156d (one shown) by which it is attached to he right-hand end of the head channel 145, the flange 1560 being beneath the head channel and the attaching eyelets or rivets passing through the flanges 156a and the bottom wall 145a of the head channel. g I

The vertical flange 15617 extends upwardly and downwardly from the horizontal flange 156a, closing the end of the head channel and also depending beneath the head channel. The cord-guide unit 156 is formed with guideway passages for the passage of cords through the vertical flange Gb and thence longitudinally through the boss 156e, so that the cords can extend outwardly and downwardly from the free end of the boss. In FIG. 4 these guideway passages are seen endwise, looking down the length of the head channel toward the'vertical flange 156)); in FIG. 7 these guideway passages are seen endwise, looking in the opposite direction. Close to.the bottom of the head channel there are two guideway passages 156e and 156]". At a somewhat higher level there is a, guideway passage 156g. As these three .guideway passages proceed toward the free end of the boss 156e, their bottom surfaces curve downwardly to provide smooth downward-and-outward exits for the cords coming from the head channel and extending through the guideway passages. g

Below the head channel the cord-guide fitting 156 is provided with a horizontal bore 156k which leads from the free end of the boss 156a and extends longitudinally I through the boss and thence through the vertical flange 1561). The bore 156h is counterbored at 1 561', the counterbore extending through the vertical flange 15612 and for a distance into the boss 156C.

The tilt cord is designated as a whole by the reference character 168 which is in the lower-right corner of FIG. 2. The tilt cord 168 is a composite, which is composed of two tilt-cord elements that are connected together end-to-end. One of the tilt-cord elements is shown separately in FIG. 3 andis designated as a whole by 168'. The other tilt-cord element is the loop that is hanging down at the right edge of FIG. 2 and is designated as a whole by 168". The tilt-cord element 168 is formed ofa single length of cord that is doubled and looped as shown in FIG. 3. The two ends of the single length of cord are fastened together in any suitable manner as by being passed through a tubular sheet-metal fastener 87 that is crimped about the overlapped end portions of the cord. When installed in the head 144 the tilt-cord element 168 makes a 180 turn round pulley 169 and has front and rear horizontal runs in the head channel, the front horizontal run being designated by 16812 and the rear horizontal run being designated by 1680. By virtue of the tilt-cord element 168 the tilt cord 168, in the front and rear horizontal runs 1681) and 1680, is a double cord with side-by-side cord-branches.

The eyelets 71 and 72, at which the upper ends of the ladder sidepieces 142a and 142 are connected to the horizontal runs of the tilt cord, are crimped about the side-by-side cord-branches of the double cord in the front and rear horizontal runs 16811 and 168C. The eyelets 71 and 72 are all alike and they are affixed in suitable manner, e.g., as explained in original application Ser. No. 6,395, now U.S. Pat. No. 3,703,920.

The cord-guide pulley 169 is slidably mounted on the head channel 145 so that the pulley can be shifted between the full-line position and the phantom-line position shown in FIG. 1. This affords slackening and tightening of the tilt cord during installation of the blind in' a window frame as explained in original application Ser. No. 6,395, now U.S. Pat. No. 3,703,920. The pulley 169 is captive on a vertically-disposed headed-shaft,

169a that is movable along the longitudinal slot l45fin the bottom of the head channel. Suitable clamping means, which is operable from beneath the headchannel, serves to clamp the shaft 1690 in adjusted position alongthe slot l45f. The clamping means shown includes a clamping screw 16912 which passes through the slot l45fand is threaded into an axial bore in the'shaft 169a. Upon being tightened, the screw 16% pulls the lower end of the shaft 169a tight against the bottom of the head channel, thereby clamping the shaft in adjusted position along the slot l45f. The screw 169!) may be kept centered with respect to the width of the slot l45fby means of an interposed washer 169611121115 pro vided with a rectangular protuberance 169d which fits into the slot 145fand has a height that is somewhat less than the thickness of the bottom wall 145a of the head channel.

From the pulley 169 the front and rear horizontal runs 168!) and 1680 of the tilt cord extend lengthwise of the head 144, passing under the rollers 151 of the cord-guide unit 146. At the right-hand end of the head, as viewed in FIGS. 1 and 2, the front horizontal run 168!) extends through the guideway passage l56f (FIGS. 4 and 7) and hangs downfrom the free end of the cylindrical boss 156C for a short distance as-shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 7. The rear horizontal run 1680 of the tilt cord extends similarly to the right-hand end of the head, where it extends through the guideway passage 156e (FIGS. 4 and 7) and hangs down from the free end of the cylindrical boss 1560 for a short distance as shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 7. The two ends of the tilt-cord.

element 168 are connected to thc two ends of the double tilt-cord element 168' in any suitable manner, e.g., in the manner shown in FIG. 7 with the aid of tubular sheet-metal fasteners 87.

The Venetian blind of FIGS. land 2 has lift-cord means including two lift cords 178 which are shiftable lengthwise of themselves to raise and lower the slats. The two lift cords 178 extend from the bottom bar 141a of the ladder-and-slat assembly upwardly through the slats 141, through the eyelets 49 into the head 144, over one or both of the rollers 51, through the guideway passage 156g (FIGS. 4 and 7) in the boss 156C, and then hang down from the boss. The two lift cords 178 are provided by a continuous length of cord having two branches extending from a bight 178a (see also FIGS. 5 and 6). With the ladder-and-slat assembly of the blind fully lowered before the blind is installed, the two lift cords 178 are pulled slack free and the bight 178a formed at the point along the length of cord which provides equalization of the two lift cords 178 for horizontal suspension of the bottom bar of the ladder-and-slat assembly.

A pulley 88 (FIGS. 2, 5 and 7) is rotatably mounted in a frame 88a which is vertically movable beneath the boss 156C. Either before or after the bight 1780 is formed, the two lift cords 178 are passed under the pulley 88 as shown; then the bight 178a is passed backwardly through the boss 1560, being inserted through bore 156h (FIGS. 7 and 4) and thence through the counterbore 156i. A two-legged equalizer 89 is passed between the two lift cords 178 and placed astride of the bight 178a as indicated in FIG. 6. Then the two lift cords 178 are pulled through the bore 156h, whereupon the equalizer 89 nests in the counterbore 156i and the bight-adjacent ends of the two lift cords 178a are anchored to the head-bar-attached fitting 156. A cord 178b, which is part of the lift-cord means, is attached as shown to the pulley frame 88a and extends downwardly therefrom. When the cord 178 is pulled downwardly the bottom bar of the blind is raised in 2:1 ratio, i.e., the bottom bar is raised two inches for each inch that the cord 17811 is pulled down.

FIGS. 9 and 368'omit the means for manipulating the tilt and lift cords. The tilt and lift cords are manipulated by a cord-operating unit which is located at a distance from the horizontal runs of these cords in the head 144 of the blind. Such cord-operating unit is attached to framing of the window with which the Venetian blind is combined; see FIG. 7 where the cord-operating unit, designated as a whole by 90, is attached to such framing. The cord-operating unit 90 is also dealt with in FIGS. 8 and 9; it is further dealt with in FIG. 11 and the portion of FIG. which lies to the right of the line MM. about the The Venetian blind of FIGS. 1 and 2 is adapted to be combined with existing single and double-glazed windows including single and double-glazed windows in which fabricated metal framing lines the opening in the building wall, with or without metal framing interposed between the glazings and the framing which lines the opening in the building wall. Many of the fabricated metal framings are made of aluminum; and many have a lintel and have jamb channels which extend vertically downward from the ends of the lintel, the bottom walls ofthe channel formations of the twojamb channels facing toward each other. The Venetian blind of FIGS. 1 and 2 is particularly well-suited for combining with such a window; the framing of the window need not be disturbed except for making in it two round holes of reasonable size for receiving parts of the blind plus three small holes for receiving attaching screws. 1

In FIG. 7 the blind of FIGS. 1 and 2 is combined with a window having fabricated metal framing which provides a horizontal lintel at 130 and vertical jamb channels 131 (one shown) which extend downwardly from the ends of the lintel. The head channel 145 of the head 144 (FIGS. 1 and 2) extends along the length of the lintel 130, being closely adjacent to the bottom face of the lintel. The ladder-and-slat assembly 140 hangs beneath the head channel 145. The bottom wall 131a of the channel formation of each jamb channel 131 is toward the edge of the space which receives the ladder-andslat assembly, while the front and rear side-walls l31b and 131C of the channel formation of each jamb channel have their widths extending away from the space which receives the ladder-and-slat assembly. Close to the upper end of the jamb channel 131 shown in FIG. 7 a hole 131d has been provided through the bottom wall of the channel formation of the jamb channel. The boss 156C which projects from one end of the head channel 145, the right-hand end in FIGS. 1 and 2, makes a sliding fit with the hole 131d and is telescoped therein, whereby the end of the head channel is supported. The opposite end of the head channel 145 is supported by an attaching screw (not shown) which is inserted through the hole 145d (FIG. 1, left-hand end) and threaded into the lintel 130.

The cord-operating unit is considered to be part of the Venetan blind; it has a tilt-cord spool-member 91 which is individual to the tilt cord 168, and a lift-cord spool-member 92 which is individual to the lift cords 178. These two spool members, which are cylindrical, are rotatable with a cylindrical shaft 93; however there is slippage between the shaft 93 and the tilt-cord spoolmember 91 while the ladderand-slat assembly of the blind is being raised or lowered. The tilt-cord spoolmember 91 is a separate member which is mounted on the shaft 93. The lift-cord spool-member 92 is part of the shaft itself. Spool member 91 spans the space between the discs 94 and 95, which have confronting planar faces. Spool member 92 spans the space between discs 95 and 96 which have confronting planar faces also. The discs 94, 95 and 96 rotate with the shaft 93, each disc being in nonslip relation to the shaft.

The tilt cord 168 includes the double-cord portion 168' (see also FIG. 3) and the single-cord portion 168 (seealso FIG. 2, lower right-hand corner). The doublecord portion 168 is connected to the tilt-cord spoolmember 91 by the length of cord which constitutes the single-cord portion 168". The spool member 91 has parallel chordal slots 91a and 91!; with which the cord 168" makes a tight fit (FIGS. 8 and 9). Before the tiltcord spool-member 91 is mounted on the shaft 93, an intermediate portion of the cord 168" is connected to the spool member 91 by forcing short lengths of the cord 168" sidewise into the slots and placing the intervening length of the cord against the cylindrical surface of the spool member 91 (FIGS. 8 and 9). From the upper end of the slot 91a as the slot stands in FIG. 9 the cord 168" is wound one or two convolutions about the spool member 91, proceeding clockwise indicated by the arrow 910. From the upper end of slot 9112 the cord is wound one or two convolutions about the spool member 91, proceeding counterclockwise indicated by the arrow 91d. When the slats of the blind are untilted the tilt-cord spool-member 91 is in the rotative position of FIG. 7 and approximately equal amounts of cord 168" are wound, in opposite directions, on the tilt-cord spool-member 91.

In FIG. 10 the part of the operating unit which lies to the right of the lines MM conforms to the corresponding part of the cord-operating unit 90 of FIG. 7; and FIG. 10 (also FIG. 11) will now be referred to by way of further explaining the cord-operating unit 90 of FIG. 7.

The portion of the cord-operating-unit shaft which lies to the right of disc 95 is composed of a cylindrical portion s, a flat-sided portion t and a threaded stem 14. The tilt-cord spool-member 91, with the cord 168" connected to it and wound around it as has been explained, is telescoped onto the cylindrical shaft-portion s and placed against the disc 95. The disc 94 has a flatsided central-opening 94a which fits the flat-sided shaft-portion t. The disc 94 is telescoped onto the shaftportion t and brought against the spool member 91 as is perhaps best seen in FIG. 10. The disc 94 is resilient, and a nut n on the threaded stem 14 biases the disc 94 against the end face 91e of the spool member 91. As shown in FIG. 10, the over-all axial dimension of the spool member 91 is somewhat greater than the axial length of the shaft portion s, which insures that the spool member will be frictionally engaged by the disc 94. The end faces 91c and 91fof the spool member 91 are concave as is seen in FIGS. 8 and 10. Thus thecontact between the spool member 91 and the planarfaced discs 94 and 95 is localized adjacentto the periphery of the spool member.

The disc 94, which functions in conjunction with the disc 95, is a friction drive which is operati'vely interposed between the tilt-cord-spool-member 91 and the shaft 93 and its crank 110 (FIG. 7). Upon rotation of the crank 110 in either direction thetilt-cord spoolmember 91 is driven through the friction drive (disc 94) and the tilt cord 168 is shifted longitudinally of itself and tilts the slats of the blind. The slats having been fully tilted in either direction, the movement of the tilt cord 168 and tilt-cord spool-member 91 are brought to a halt. Any continued movement of the tilt cord 168 will be brief; it'will raise the ladder-and-slat assembly until the top slat 141, now fully tilt'edthough shown un- 'tilted in FIG. 2, will strike the bottom of the head channel 145 and prevent any further movement of the tilt cord 168 and tilt-cord spool-member 91.

In addition to serving as a friction drive, the disc 94 serves as a brake also. The slats having been tilted to any desired position and the crank 110 released, fortu itous rotation of the crank 110 and shaft 93 is obviated by a brake disc 97 as will'be explained. The disc 94 now serves as a brake; it prevents fortuitous'rotation of the tilt-cord spool-member 91 on the portion s of the shaft 93, thereby preventing fortuitous tilting movement of the slats.

. To raise or lower the slats of the blind, the cord 178b is reeled in or payed out by the lift-cord spool-member 92 which is part of the shaft 93. Full tilting of the slats is effected by a relatively small amount of rotative movement of the tilt-cord spool-membr 91, and thereupon the rotation of the tilt-cord spool-member 91 is automatically brought to a halt as has been explained. During such full tilting of the slats the lift-cord spoolmember 92 effects only insignificant raising or lowering of the slats as a result of the rotation of the crank 110 and shaft 93 to tilt the slats..Sufficient continued rotation of the crank 110 and shaft 93 effects the reeling in or paying out of the cord l78b which is needed for whatever-raising or lowering of the slats is desired. The

crank 110 is a common operator for rotating the tiltcord and lift-cord spool-members 91 and 92, and the crank is in continuous torque-imparting relationship to both of these spool members. The tilt and lift cord spool-members are in nonslip relation to the tilt and lift cords. I

At the opposite ends of the lift-cord spool-member 92 there are cheek surfaces 95a and 96a that are provided by the discs .95 and 96. Adjacent to the cheek surface 95a the spool member 92 has a diametrical hole 92a (FIG. 10) which has counterbores 92b and 920 leading from its opposite ends. The lift-cord means of the blind is connected to the lift-cord spool-member 92 by passing the lower end of the cord 1781; through the hole 92a and then providing the cord with an end knot 178d (FIG. 7). In attaching the cord 178b to the spool member 92 it may be passed in either direction through the hole 92a (FIG. 10 Uponthe cord being knotted and then retracted the knot 178d will enter one or the other of the counterbores 92b and 920 (FIGv 10). Withdrawal of the cord from the hole 92a is prevented by the knot 178d engaging the bottom of the counterbore 92b or 92c (see FIG. 7).

As the cord 178b is wound on the spool member 92 it can be expected to move closely adjacent to the cheek surface 95a at some times and closely adjacent to the cheek surface 96a at other times. These cheek surfaces are provided with hemispherical projections 95b and 96b which, when the cord 178b is closely adjacent to the cheek surface, strike the cord and push it away and thereby inhibit the cord from piling up against the cheek surface. In FIG. 10 this section is indicated in connection with projection 95b; note the phantom showing of the cord 178b and the two arrows that are associated therewith.

The shaft 93 of the cord-operating unit (FIG. 7) extends from in front of the vertical jamb-channel 131, through the front wall l31b of the'jamb channel, and to the spool members 91 and 92 the crank 110 being attached to the portion of the shaft which is in front of the jamb channel 131. In extending from the crank 110 to the jamb channel 131 the shaft 93 passes through a bearing block in which itis journalled. The bearing block 100 has a cylindrical boss 100a which projects through a circular hole 131g that has been provided previously through the front wall 131]: of the jamb channel 131. The bearing block 100 is attached to the front wall l31b of the jamb channel by screws 101 and 102.

The disc 96 is integral with the shaft 93, as is the disc 95. The outward face of the disc 96 is flat and it confronts the flat end-face of the bearing block boss 100a, being separated therefrom by a friction disc or washer 97 that is on the shaft 93 and is shown diagrammah ically. A flat-faced clamping nut 103 is threaded onto the outer end of the shaft 93 and confronts the flat outer face of the bearing block 100, being separated therefrom by a friction disc or washer 98 which s on the shaft 93 and is shown diagrammatically. The friction discs or washers 97 and 98 are braking means which impose a drag upon rotation of the crank 110. When the crank is released after raising the blind, i.e., raising the slats thereof, the drag imposed-by the friction discs or washers 97 and 98 prevents reverse rotation of the crank and thereby obviates fortuitous lowering of the slats due to their weight.

The friction discs or washers 97 and 98 are of suitable type and are made of suitable materials. At least one of these washers, e.g., the washer 98, is of a type which affords resilient yielding in an axial direction to a marked extent when the washer is axially loaded. By

tightening the clamping nut 103 the discs or washers 97 and 98 are axially loaded to the extent needed to cause the drag which they exert to be sufficient to obviate fortuitous lowering of the heaviest ladder-and-slat assembly, when fully raised, with which the cord-operating unit 90 is to be used. With the nut 103 thus tightened, and then held with a wrench against rotation, the hub llb of the crank is forcibly tightened against the nut 103 after the manner of a jamming lock nut. Thereby both the crank 1 and the nut 103 are made fast to the shaft 93. If desired, set screws 103a and 110a may be provided to further lock the nut 103 and the crank 110 against movement relative to the shaft 93.

For further disclosure pertaining to the cordoperating unit 90, and also for procedure which may be used to install the cord-operating unit 90 in the jamb channel 131, see original application Ser. No. 6,395, now U.S. Pat. No. 3,703,920.

The bearing block 100 of the cord-operating unit 90 has a relatively large axial dimension outside of the jamb channel (see FIG. 7). This is undesirable when the blind is to be combined with some of the existing windows. A further limitation of the cord-operating unit 90 is that an inattentive or dull person might possibly continue to rotate the crank 110, forcibily, after the slats had been fully raised; this could break the cord 17812 of the lift-cord means. These limitations are overcome in the cord-operating unit 590 that is shown in FIG. 10.

Reference will now be had to FIG. 10 and certain comparisons will be made with FIG. 7. The bearing block 500 has substantially the same over-all axiallength as the bearing block 100. However, the cylindrical bearing-block-boss 5000 is much longer than the boss 100a (FIG. 7); and the boss 500a occupies most of the over-all axial-length of the bearing block 500. The rest of the bearing block 500 is reduced to a flange 500!) that is secured against the front face of the jamb channel by screws inserted through holes 5000 and 500d; cf. screws 101 and 102 in FIG. 7. A thick-wall cylindrical-sleeve 504 is interposed between the shaft 593 and the bearing block 500. The right-hand end of the sleeve 504 is planar and is flush with the planar end of the boss 500a. The confronting face of the disc 96 is planar, and a friction disc or washer 597 is interposed between the face of disc 96 and the end faces of sleeve 504 and boss 500a. Against the front face of the bearing block 500 there is a friction washer 598 which is shown diagrammatically. The washer 598 is of a type which affords resilient yielding in anaxial direction to a marked extent when the washer is axially loaded.

Threaded onto the left-hand end of the shaft 593 there is a nut S12 and ajamming nut 513. When the nut 512 is tightened the inner portion of the friction washer 597 is axially loaded; the disc 96 applies pressure to one side of the washer 597 and the confronting end of sleeve 504 applies pressure to the opposite side of the washer 597. The inner portion of the friction washer 597, which functions in conjunction with the end of sleeve 504 and the confronting face of disc 96, consti tutes a friction drive; and the driving torque for shaft 593 is transmitted by this friction drive when the sleeve 504 is rotated by the crank 510. It will be seen that this drive is operatively interposed between the crank 510 and both the lift-cord spool-member 92 and the tiltcord spool-member 91. The purpose of this friction drive is to afford slippage between the crank 510 and the lift-cord spool-member 92 when the slats of the blind have been fully raised. This protects the cord 178)) against breakage if rotation of the crank 510 is continued, forcibly, after the slats of the blind have been fully raised. By tightening the nut 512 the drive at the washer 597 is given a slipping torque which is sub stantially higher than the slipping torque of the drive at 94 and sufficiently high to insure that the slats of the blind can be fully raised without slippage of the friction drive that is at the washer 597. Then jamming nut 513 is tightened against nut 512 to maintain the adjustment.

When nut 503 is tightened it axially loads washer 598 and the outer portion of washer 597, the outer portion of washer 597 being squeezed between disc 96 and the end of boss 500a. The washer 598'and the outer portion of washer 597 constitute braking means which imposes a drag upon the rotation of the crank 510. Nut 503 is tightened sufficiently to cause this braking means to impose a drag which is high enough to prevent counterrotation of the crank 510 and lowering of the slats under their own weight when the crank is released after the slats have been fully raised. The nut 503 may be held in adjusted position by a set screw 503a. The hub 510!) of the crank 510 is screwed onto the end of the sleeve 504 and tightened against the nut 503. The hub may be further held by a set screw 510a.

In FIGS. 12, 13, and 14 the blind of FIGS. 1 and 2, using the cord-operating unit of FIG. 10, is combined with a commercial window. The window is Hopes" window shown on page 7 of Hope's Windows, lncs., insert at 19a/Ho in Sweets Architectural Catalog File for l968. In FIGS. 12, 13 and 14 the window is taken from Hopes illustrations in Sweets Architectural Catalog File.

Hopes window is double-glazed and has fabricated aluminum framing. It has inner glazing 600 and outer glazing 601. Outer framing 602 is provided to line the opening in the building wall. Sash framing 603 is interposed between the outer framing 602 and the glazings 600 and 601. The sash framing 603 may be pivotally connected to the outer framing 602 on either a vertical or a horizontal axis, a vertical axis 604-604 being indicated in FIG. 12. Sealing strips 605 and 606 seal the sash framing 603 to the outer framing 602. The space between the glazings 600 and 601 is accessible by swinging the glazing 601 and its individual frame away from the remainder of the sash framing; the joint at the plane of separation is scaled by a sealing strip 607.

The sash framing 603 has a lintel 630 (FIG. 13). Jamb channels extend downwardly from the ends of the lintel, along the vertical edges of the space between the glazings. The right-hand jamb'channel is shown in cross section in FIG. 14 where it is designated as a whole by 631. The channel formation of the channel 631 has a bottom wall 631a which is toward the space between the glazings, and has front and rear walls 631!) and 63lc which have their widths extending away from the space between the glazings, the walls 631!) and 6310 being generally parallel to the glazings 600 and 601.

The blind is combined with the window in the manner that has been referred to and is more fully described in original application Ser. No. 6,395, now U.S. Pat. No. 3,703,920. The blind is shown diagrammatically in FIG. 13, where the head channel is shown against the lintel 630. The right-hand end of the head channel 145 (FIG. 14) is supported by the boss 1562 extending through the upper level hole 131din the bottom wall 631a of the channel formation of the jamb channel. The opposite end of the head channel is supported by one or more screws inserted into the lintel through holes in the bottom of the head channel; see hole 145d in FIG. 1. The tilt and lift cords are as in FIGS. 1, 2, and 7, extending downwardly within the jamb channel 631 and being connected to the tilt-cord spool-member 91 and the lift-cord spool-member 92 as has been explained.

In FIG. 15 the outer glazing and its individual frame are omitted, being the same as in FIG. 14. The inner glazing is designated by 700 and the individual framing therefore differs from FIG. 14. In FIG. 15 there is a recess at 740 and the front-to-rear space within the jamb channel 731 is less than in FIG. 14. With the jamb channel of FIG. 15 the cord-operating unit 90 of FIG. 7 is used. The major portion of the axial length of the bearing block 100 is outside of the jamb channel 731, and less front-to-rear' space is needed within the channel 731.

FIGS. 16-19 illustrate what may be considered to be the second Venetial blind that is disclosed; it is the blind of FIGS. 1-7 modified by different cord-guide unit at the right-hand end of the head and a different arrangement for anchoring the two lift cords to the cord-guide unit. In the Venetian blind illustrated in FIGS. 1-7 the head is designated as a whole by 144, the cord-guide unit at the right-hand end of the head is designated as a whole by 156, and each of the two lift cords isdesignated by 178. In the Venetian blind illustrated in FIGS. l6-19'the head is designated as a whole by 244, the cord-guide unit at the right-hand end of the head is designated as a whole by 256, and each of the two lift cords is designated by 278.

In both the Venetian blind of FIGS. 1-7 and the Ve-' netian blind of FIGS. 167-19 the same parts are designated by the same reference characters, viz: The head channel is designated as a whole by 145; it has a bottom wall that is designated by 145a, a front wall that is designated by 1451) and a rear wall that is designated by 1452. The tilt cord is designated as a whole by 168 and it is a composite, which is composed of two tilt-cord elements that are connected together end-to-end. One of the tilt-cord elements is designated as a whole by 168 and is formed from a single length of cord that is doubled and looped as shown in FIG. 3. The other tilt-cord element is designated as a whole by 168 and is the loop that depends from the right-hand end of the head (see FIGS. 2, 7 and 19). The lift-cord means includes the pulley that is designated by 88 the pulley frame that is designated by 88a, and the cord that is designated by 178 (see FIGS. 2, 5, 7, 17 and 19).

The cord-guide unit 256 fits into and is nested within the head channel 145 as is best seen in FIG. 18. The body of the cord-guide unit is designated as a whole by 256 and is a U-shaped sheet-steel stamping having a bottom wall 256a, a front wall 256b, and a rear wall 2560. The bottom wall 256a of the cordguide unit is against the bottom Wall 1450 of the head channel and is secured thereto by an eyelet 256d. At its right-hand end the bottom wall 256a of the cord-guide unit (FIGS. 16 and 17) terminates in the vertical plane of the righthand end of the head channel 145. Before it terminates, however, it is formed to provide a convex semicylindrical cord-guiding surface SC that spans the space be- 14 tween the front and rear walls 256!) and 2566 of the cord-guide unit.

The cord-guide unit 256 has a stamped sheet-steel cover-member 2562 which is horizontally disposed at a level that is adjacent to the upper edges of the front and rear walls 256b and 2562. This cover member is mounted and secured as shown in FIG. 18, rivetlike posts 256f and 256g pass through the cover plate 2562 and the bottom wall 256a, and these posts have annular shoulders against the cover member 2562 and the bottom wall 256a. The ends of theposts 256fand 256g are swaged into holding engagement wtih the cover plate 2562 and the bottom wall 256a. The bottom wall 256a is dimpled upwardly where the posts 256f and 256g pass through it, so that the swaged lower ends of the posts will not prevent the cord-guide unit from nesting fully into the head channel 145. To obviate chafing of the two lift cords 278 by the left-hand and right-hand edges of the cover member 2562, the edge portions of the cover member are bent upwardly somewhat as seen at 256j and 256k, the bent-up portions spanning the space between the front and rear walls 256b and 2560 of the cord-guide unit. A central hole 256m in the cover member 2562 permits the insertion of an eyelet setting tool when setting the eyelet 256d to secure the cord-guide unit to the head channel.

Longitudinally of the head channel 145, the front and rear walls 256b and 256c of'the cord-guide unit extend well beyond the end of the head channel; see FIGS. 16, 17 and 19. Spanning the space between the front and rear walls 256]) and 256C and positioned beyond the end of the head channel 145, there is an axle 256n. The

' ends of the axle are affixed to the walls 256 and 2560.

Rotatably mounted on the axle there are cylindrical sleeves 256p and 256r and an intervening washer 256s.

The two lift cords 278 extend under the cover member 2562 between the posts 256f and 256g; they-then pass over the rotatable sleeve 256r, downwardly to the pulley 88, about half way around the pulley, and then back upwardly toward the cord-guide fitting 256 all as best seen in FIG. 33. The two liftcords 278 are equalized, i.e., adjusted to suspend the bottom bar of the blind horizontally as is well understood. The ends of the equalized lift cords 278 coming up from the pulley 88 are then anchored to the head 244 in any suitablemanner, e.g., similarly to the anchoring of the lift cords 178 in FIG. 2. Alternatively, one of the lift cords 278 ascending from the pulley 88 may be extended and passed reversely over the rotatable sleeve 256p and then the ends of the two lift cords be fastened together by a metal fastener 278. As the cord 178b is pulled downwardly or allowed to move upwardly, the two lift cords 278 are pulled in or payed out and have double the movement of cord 178b, the same as with the two lift cords 178 in FIGS. 5 and 7.

The front horizontal run 168!) of the tilt cord passes between the front wall 25612 of the cord-guide unit and the post 256f(see FIG. 18), after which it passes over the cord-pulling surface SC and extends downwardly as seen in FIG. 17. Simlarly the rear horizontal run 168C of the tilt cord passes between the rear wall 256C of the cord-guide unit and the post 256g, thence over the cord-guiding surface SC, and downwardly as seen in FIG. 17 and 19.

As has been explained previously, FIGS. 12-14 show the Venetian blind of FIGS. 1 and 2 combined with one ofHopes commercial windows. FIG. 19 illustrates the second Venetian blind substituted for the Venetian blind of FlGS. 1 and 2. In FIG. 19 the upper right-hand corner-p0rti0n of the Hopes sash forming 603 of FIGS. 12l4 is indicated diagrammatically in phantom lines, including the lintel 630 and the right-hand jambchannel 631. In lieu of the upper level circular hole 131d (FIGS. 14 and 7) which receives the circular boss l56c (FIGS. 1, 2, 4, 5,7 and 14), the bottom wall 63111 of the channel formation of the jamb channel 631 is provided with an upper level rectangular hole 131d (FIG. 19) which receives the right-hand end of the head channel and supports it closely adjacent to the lintel 630 as is shown in FIG. 19. If desired a vertical attaching screw can also be used at the right-hand end of the head 244, being inserted through the eyelet 256d and threaded into the lintel 630.

FIG. 17 shows the second Venetian blind combined with a window which is a slight modification of the Hopes" commercial window of FIGS. 12-14. The window is the same as in FIGS. 12-14 except that it has modified sash framing which is indicated diagrammatically in phantom lines in FIG. 17 and is desginated as a whole by 603. This sash framing has the same righthand jamb-channel 631. However, the horizontal channel across the top has only a top wall and front and rear walls; there is no bottom wall toward the space between the glazings. As shown in FIG. 17, the head 244 of the blind is nested within the horizontal framing channel at the top of the sash; the top wall of this channel becomes the lintel, which is designated by 630. The cord-guide fitting 256 projects into vertical alignment with the interior of the jamb channel 631, and the tilt cords and the lift-cord means pass downwardly within the jamb channel and are operatively connected to the spool members 91 and 92 of the cord-operating unit 590. that is shown in FIGS. 14 and 10. The right-hand end of the head channel 145 is secured to the lintel 630' by a vertical screw S which is inserted through the eyelet 256d and threaded into the lintel 630'. The left-hand end of the head channel 145 is similarly secured to the lintel by a screw inserted through the hole 145:! (FIG. I), as has been explained.

FIGS. 20 and 2] hereof deal with the third Venetian blind that is disclosed. The ladder-and-slat assembly of the blind is designated as a whole by 340 and is positioned beneath a horizontally-extending support or head that is designated as a whole by 344. The ladderand-slat assembly includes a series of upwardlycrowned sheet-metal slats 341 and a bottom bar 341a that are supported and articulated together in known manner by two or more string" ladders, each of which is designated as a whole by 342. The ladder-and-slat assembly 340 may conform to the ladder-and-slat assembly that is disclosed in Lorentzen et al US. Pat. No.

3,425,479 dated Feb. 4, I969, with the bottom bar 341a and its fittings and arrangement conforming to the bottom bar and its fittings and arrangement that are disclosed in Lorentzen et al U.S.Pat. No. 3,485,286 dated Dec. 23, 1969. The head 344 that is shown may be considered as consisting of. the upwardly-opening U-shaped sheet-steel channel 345 and the thereto attaehed units which guide the tilt cord, guide the lift cords, and guide the head-entering portions of the sidepieces of the ladders 342.

Above the ladders 342 the head 344 has two cordguide units that are each designated as a whole by 346.

The cord-guide units 346 are duplicates, though the left-hand unit 346 is integrally connected to a pulley unit 346. Each cord-guide unit 346 has a U-shaped sheet-steel body 347 that is nested as shown within the head channel 345, the bottom 347a of the cord-guide unit body being against the bottom 345a of the head channel and the sides 347b and 3476 of the cord-guideunit body being against the sides 345b and and 3450 of the head channel. The bottom 347a of the body of each guide unit 346 is attached to the bottom 345a of the head channel by three conventional metal eyelets 348, 349 and 350. These eyelets, which may be considered as part of the cord-guide unit 346, pass through the bottom 347a of the cord-gide-unit body and also through the bottom 345a of the head channel. The eyelets 348, 349 and 350 also do cord guiding as will be explained. A rivet-like shaft 351 extends between the sides 34717 and 347C of the U-shaped cord-guide-unit body 347. The shaft 351 has a smooth cylindrical surface for cord guiding; and the shaft constitutes a cord guide, as will be explained. Each end of the rivet-like shaft 351 is suitably prevented from retraetive movement through the side 347b or 347C, for example, by upset or enlarged ends that are nested in outwardly-facing annular grooves that are impressed at 347d from the metal of the sides 347b and 3470. The shaft 351 may make a tight fit with the sides 347b and 347e, and thereby be nonrotatable. Alternatively, the shaft 351 may make a loose fit with the sides 347b and 3470, and thereby be rotatable.

At its right-hand end in FIGS. 20 and 21 the head 344 has a cord-guide unit which is designated as a whole by 356. The cord-guide unit 356 has a U-shaped sheetsteel body 357 that is nested as shown within the head channel 345, the bottom 357a of the eord-guide-unit body being against the bottom 345a of the head channel and the sides 357!) and 357cof the cord-guide-unit body 357 being against the sides 345 and 3450 of the head channel. The bottom 357a of the body of the cord-guide unit 357 is attached to the bottom 345a of the head channel by two conventional metal eyelets 358 and 359. These eyelets, which may be considered as part of the cord-guide unit 356, pass through the bottom 357a of the cord-guide-unit body and also through the bottom 3450 of the head channel. As its right-hand end in FIGS. 20 and 21 the bottom wall 357a of the eord-guide-unit body is formed into a convex semicylindrical cord-guiding surface SC that spans the space between the front and rear walls of the eord-guide-unit body 357. Through the bottom 357a of the cord-guide unit 356 there is a screw hole 345e which registers with a like hole (not shown) through the bottom wall 345a of the head channel; a screw (not shown) is inserted upwardly through these registering holes to attach the right-hand end of the head 344 to the soffit of a window frame or window opening.

Longitudinally of the head channel 345, the front and rear walls 357!) and 357c of the cord-guide-unit body 357 extend well beyond the right-hand end of the head channel 345 (FIGS. 20 and 21 ).-Spanning the space between the front and rear walls 357b and 357C, and positioned beyond the right-hand end of the head channel 345, there is a rivet-like shaft 361 which constitutes a cord guide and which has a smooth cylindrical surface for guiding the cord. The shaft 361 is the same and is mounted the same as the shaft 351 of each cordguiding unit 346. The description and comments in connection with shaft 351 apply in connection with shaft 361.

The pulley unit 346' is integral with the cord-guide unit 346 and, in FIGS. 20 and 21, extends to the left therefrom. The body 347' of the pulley unit is a sheetsteel channel that is nested in the head channel 345 and is a continuation of the channel 347 which constitutes the body of the adjacent cord-guide unit 346. A stub shaft 364 is affixed to and projects vertically upward from the bottom wall of the pulley unit 346. Captive on the shaft 364 there is a freely rotatable plastic or metal pulley 369. The pulley 369 has a peripheral groove369a which receives the tilt cord of the blind. Through the bottom of the pulley unit there is a screw A hole 345d which registers witha like hole (not shown) through the bottom wall 345a of the head channel; a screw (not shown) is inserted upwardly through these registering holes to attach the left-hand end of the head 344 to the soffit or lintel of a window opening.

The tilt cord of the third Venetian blind is designated as a whole by the reference character 368, which is in the lower-right corner of FIG. 21. The tilt cord 368 is a composite that is composed of an eyelet-carrying portion 368 (shown separately in FIG. 23 of Ser. No. 269372) and connecting portions and connectors by which the eyelet-carrying portion is connected to a cord-operating unit that is located at a distance from the eyelet-carryingportion. V

The tilt cord 368,'and more especially the eyelet; carrying portion 368; thereof, has front and rear horizontal runs 3 68b ad 368c within the head channel 345. Between the front and rear horizontal runs 368b and 368c the tilt cord is guided through a 180 turn by the pulley 369, whereby the front and rear horizontal runs move in opposite directions when the tilt cord is shifted longitudinally of itself.

Connected to the front horizontal run 3681; of the tilt cord there are sheet-metal eyelets, one for each ladder 342, which are spaced apart by a distance that is at least approximately equal (and preferably is equal)-to the spacing of the ladders. Like eyelets are connected I to the rear horizontal run 3680, being designated by 372 and being correspondingly positioned and spaced as is perhaps best seen in FIG. 23. The manner of connecting the eyelets 371 and 372 to the tilt-cord runs 368b and 368C is explained and illustrated in my application Ser. No. 269,372 filed July 6,1972.

, Each ladder 342 has cordlike sidepieces, the front sidepiece being designated 342a (FIGS. 20 and 21 and the rear sidepiece b'eingdesigna ted 34212 (FIG. 20) The slats 341 rest on the crosspieces or rungs of the ladders 342, as is well known and has been mentioned in connection with FIG. 3. Each front sidepiece 342a extends upwardly into the head 344 through an eyelet 350 and is guided by the eyelet through a turn of approximately 90', after which it extends'generally horizontally to the nearby eyelet 371. Similarly the rear sidepiece 3421) of the ladder extends upwardly into the head 344 through an eyelet 348 and is guided by t h e yelet ihr ough a turn or appr cKimateIy 90, after which it extends generally horizontally to the nearby eyelet 372. The upper end of each ladder sidepiece is provided with a sheet-metal barb 374 which is the same as the bard 74 in FIGS. 1,2, 9, and 10. The barbs 374 are inserted through the eyelets 371 and 372-connecting the front and rear sidepieces of the ladders 342 to the front and rear horizontal runs of the tilt cord 368, the same as the corresponding connections in FIGS. 1 and 2. v

The Venetian blind of FIGS. and 21 has lift-cord means which includes two lift cords that are shiftable lengthwise of themselves to raise and lower the slats. The two lift cords 378 extend from the bottom bar 341a, upwardly through conventional rout holes (not shown) in the slats 341, into the head 344 through eye'- lets 349 that guide the lift cords through 90 turns, after which the lift cords extend horizontally to the righthand end of the head (FIG. 20), over the cord-guiding surface SC, under the pulley 388, and back upwardly to a bight 370 (FIG. 21) which embraces the transverse shaft 361. The two lift cords 378 are provided by a continuous length of cord having two branches which unite at the bight 378a. The two branches which constitute the two lift cords 378 are installed by threading them through the blind from the bight 378a.

' movable beneath the shaft 361. A cord 3781), which is part of the lift-cord means, is attached as shown to the pulley frame 388a and extends downwardly therefrom. When the cord 378b is pulled downwardly the blind is raised in 2:1 ratio, i.e., the bottom bar 341a is raised I two inches for each inch that the cord 378b is pulled downwardly.

The an and lift cords a manipulated by the cordoperating unit 390 (FIGS. 20 and 2 1) which corresponds to the cord-operating unit in FIG. 7 and which is located at a distance from the horizontal runs of these cords in the head 344 of the blind. In FIGS. 20 and 21 the cord-operating unit 390 and elements and structure associated therewith are shown in exploded relation to a vertical plane adjacent to the right-hand end of thehead-344, and dotted lines are used to indicate diagrammatically the relevant continuations.

The blind of FIGS. 20 and 21 is adapted to be combined with a window by securing the head 344 to the soffit or lintel, the expanse of the ladder-and-slat assembly 340 confronting the glazing in the case ofa sin gle-glazed window, and the ladder-and-slat assembly being between the glazings in the case of a double glazed window. In FIGS. 20 and 21 the framing and glazings of a double-glazed window with which the blind may be combined are indicated diagrammatically in dot-dash lines, the framing being-fabricated metal framing. The lintel of the framing is achannel 381 having its open side facing downwardly, and the jambs of the framing are channels 382 and 383 having their open sides facing toward one another. The head 344 of the blind is nested in the lintel-.channel 381, being attached to the lintel by screws through the holes 345:! and 345e has been explained. The window has inside and outside glazings which are indicated diagrammatically, the inside glazing being designated by 385 and the ou'tsideglazing being designated by 386.

The blind of FIGS. 20 and 21 is adapted to be combined with a window having the fabricated metal framing that is shown in FIG. 7 being substituted for the blind that is shown in FIG. 7. The head 344 is attached by screws, as hereinbefore mentioned, to lintel of FIG. 7. Preparatory to attaching the head 344 to the lintel 130, the cord guide 361 and at least a portion of the cord guide SC (FIGS. 20 and 21) are inserted through a suitable opening that has been provided through the bottom wall 131a (FIG. 7) of the channel formation of the jamb channel adjacent to the top of the jamb, the opening corresponding to the hole 131d in FIG. 7. The cord-operating unit 390 (FIGS. 20 and 21) is substituted for the cord-operating unit 90 of FIG. 7, the unit 390 being attached to the front wall 131b of the jamb channel by screws that correspond with screws 101 and 102 in FIG. 7 and one of which is indicated at 301 in FIG. 20.

The Venetian blind of FIGS. 20 and 21 hereof may also be combined with windows having other specific metal framings, e.g., the fabricated metal framings that have been referred to and have been discussed in connection with FIGS. 12-15, 17 and 19 in which figures the same are illustratedthe blind of FIGS. 20 and 21 hereof being substituted for the blinds there disclosed.

The cord-operating unit 390 is considered to be part of the Venetian blind. The unit 390 has a tilt-cord spool-member 391 which is individual to the tilt cord 368, and it has a lift-cord spool-member which is individual to the lift cords 378. These two spool members, which are cylindrical, are portions of a one-piece metal shaft 393. There is slippage between the tilt-cord spoolmember 391 and the tilt cord 368 while the ladder-andslat assembly of the blind is being raised Or lowered,as will be explained. Integral cheeks 394, 395 and 396, having circular inner and outer peripheries, complete the two spools.

The spools Shaft 393 is journalled in a bearing block 400 that has a cylindrical boss 4000 which projects through a circular hole. that has'been provided previously in the front wall of the jamb channel 383. Screws (one indicated at 301). attach the bearing block to the jamb channel. The disc-like cheek 396, which is integral with the shaft 393, has a flat face which confronts the inner end-face of the bearing block. The shaft 393 extends through and beyond the bearing block 400. In front of the bearing block the shaft carries a resilient friction-washer 398,.a crank 410, and nuts 303, 304, 305 and 306 all of which are threaded onto the shaft.

The nut 303 adjustably clamps the axially-resilient washer 398 against the flat outer face of the bearing block 400. The nut 304 is a lock nut for the nut 303. The crank 410 includes a radial arm 4100 which is pierced adjacent to its inner end by the shaft 393. The arm 410a is essentially a flat strip of flexible but relatively hard nylon. The nut 305 adjustably clamps the nylon arm 410a against the nut 304. The nut 306 is a lock nut for the nut 305. Those faces of the nuts 304 and 305 which confront the crank arm 410a are made flat and smooth or, alternatively, metal washers that are flat and smooth are interposed between those faces and the crank arm 410a. The crank-arm hole 410!) which receives the shaft 393 is preferably lined with a metal bushing (not shown) that has an axial length which is somewhat less than the thickness of the crank arm.

For reasons which will be explained, one or two quick connectors 321 or 322 are included in the tilt cord 368. The connectors 321 and 322 are alternatives, and one of each is shown in FIG. 21 merely by way of illustrating each one. Each of these connectors is a shallow channel that is stamped in one piece from sheet steel, the channel formation of the two connectors being the same (see also Ser. No. 269,372). The connectors 321 and 322 are each symmetrical about a central cross-sectional plane. Adjacent to each end of each of the connectors 321 and 322 there is a hole h the diameter of which is only a little larger than the diameter of the cord that is to be connected. At its center point the connector 321 is drilled and tapped to receive a round-head machine-screw 321a. THe head of the screw is adapted to enter the channel formation of the connector, with the periphery of the head extending close to the side walls of the channel as shown in FIG. 21. The connector 322 is provided with upper and lower pairs of edge notches, upper and lower re ferring to the various dispositions as they are seen in the drawing. One notch of each pair is designated by n and the other by n. As the notches are traversed from their open ends to their closed ends they incline toward their companion holes h. THe connectors 321 and 322 suitably connect the confronting upper and lower cords, variations in the specific manner of connection being feasible.

Referring to the connector 321 as shown, the upper and lower cords are threaded from the back through the upper and lower holes h. The upper cord end is then knotted at k to prevent withdrawal. The lower cord is drawn through the lower hole h as desired by way of reducing the effective length of cord, and then the lower cord is looped around the stem of screw 321a. The screw is then tightened down to secure the lower cord by clamping the cord within the channel formation of the connector 321.

Referring to the connector 322 as shown in FIG. 21, the upper and lower cords are threaded from the front through the upper and lower holes 11. The upper cord end is then knotted at k to prevent withdrawal. The lower cord is drawn through the lower hole h as desired by way of reducing the length of cord and then the lower cord is secured by being wound as follows: from the back of lower hole h, around the lower end of the connector 322 at a point that is to the left of hole h, upwardly on the front of the connector to the lower notch n, through the lower notch n adjacent to the closed end thereof, downwardly on the back ofthe connector and around the lower end of the connector at a point that is to the right of the hole h, and upwardly on the front of the connector and thence through the lower notch n adjacent to the closed end thereof. The notches n and n' are of decreasing width as traversed from their open ends to their closed ends, the cord freely entering the notches at their open ends but being grippingly held by the sides of the notches when the cord is forced sidewise to a position adjacent to the closed ends of the notches.

Sheet steel 0.050 inch thick has been used for connector 321, which has a tapped hole for screw 321a. Sheet steel 0.050 inch thick has been used for connector 322 also, but thinner sheet steel is contemplated.

The head 344 of the blind is attached to the soffit or lintel of the window framing, and the cord-operating unit 390 is ordinarily installed in a jamb channel at a distance from the head. The connection of the lift cords 378 to the lift-cord spool-member 392 can be such as to leave a little slack in the lift cords when the bottom bar 341a rests on the window sill. The lower end of the cord 3785 (FIG. 21) is threaded through a diametrica] hole 392a at the inner end of the lift-cord spoolmember 392 and then the lower end of the cord is knotted at 378d to prevent withdrawal. The knot is drawn into an appropriate counterbore at the end of hole 392a. The upper end of the cord 378b is fished upwardly and is suitably attached to the pulley frame 388a, undue slack being eliminated and excess length of the cord 378b being cut off. Rotation of the crank 410 winds the cord 37812 on the lift-cord spool-member 392, taking up any slack and then raising the blind.

Tl-le eyelet-carrying portion 3368' of the tilt cord has terminal eyelets E and E, each of which is lined with a smaller eyelet e to prevent possible cutting of cord that is tied to the eyelets E and E. In the particular arrangement shown in the drawing the tilt cord 368 includes (a) the eyelet-carrying portion 368, (b) portions 368d and 368e which are tied to the eyelets E and E and extend to the connectors 321 and 322, (c) the connectors 321 and 322, and (d) a portion 368" which extends from the connectors 321 and 322 and which is wrapped a plurality of turns bout the tilt-cord spoolmember 391. In FIG. the cord portion 368" is shown as being wrapped approximately six turns about the tilt-cord spool-member 391. The tilt-cord spoolmember 391 constitutes a friction drive to th tilt cord portion 368; and hence a friction drive to the entire tilt cord 368 to tilt the slats of the blind. Therefore the tilt cord 368 of the installed blind needs to be taut.

The tilt cord portions 368d and 368e are made of such length that the connectors 321 and 322 will be in an accessible location when the head 344 of the blind has been attached to the soffit or lintel of the window framing. The mid portion of the tilt cord portion 368" is wrapped the desired number of turns about the tiltcord spool-member 391 and, in connection with the installation of the cord-operating unit 390 in the jamb channel, the two branches of the tilt cord portion 368 are fished upwardly for attachment to the connectors- 321 and 322. The branch of cord portion 368" which confronts the cord portion 368d is secured to the con-' nector 321 in the manner that has been explained. Then the cord portion 3682 and theconfronting branch of cord portion 368" are drawn toward each other to pull the tilt cord 368 taut, whereupon the confronting branch of the cord portion 368" is secured to the connector 322 in the manner that has been explained. It

will be seen that the attachment of the branches of tilt cord portion 368" to the.connectors 321 and 322 are of such characters that the connectors afford quick release of the confronting cord portions for readjustment and quick reconnection of the confronting cord portions in readjusted relation.

With some installations there is Sufficient accessibility to make it feasible to use buta single quick connector in the tilt cord 368. In such case the cord portion 368" is omitted. The depending end of tilt cord portion 368d is attached to the top ofa connector, a connector per connector 322. being presently preferred over a connector per connector 32] regardless of whether one or two connectors is being used. The tilt cord portion 368e is continued to and wrapped the desired number of turns around the tilt-cord spool'member 391, being then continued back up and into confronting relation to the cord portion 368d. The confronting runs of the cord portions'368d and 368e are then drawn toward each other to pull the entire tilt cord 368 taut, whereupon the confronting run of cord portion 3680 is secured to the lower part of the connector in the manner that has been explained.

The tilt-cord spool-member 39l with the tilt cord portion 368" wrapped around it is a friction drive which is operatively interposed between the tilt cord 368 and the shaft 393 and its crank 410. With the slats 341 untilted, and upon rotation of the crank 410 in either direction, this friction drive shifts the tilt cord 368 longitudinally of itself and tilts-the slats 341 by pulling up the ladder side-pieces 342a or 342b that are at one face of the blind and paying out the ladder sidepie ces 34219 or 342a that are at the other face of the blind. The slats having been fully tilted in either direction, movement of the tilt cord 368 will be brought to a halt. Any continued movement of the tilt cord 368 will be brief; it will raise the ladder-and-slat assembly 340 until the top slat 341, now fully tilted though shown untilted in FIG. 21, will strike the bottom 345a of the head channel and prevent further movement of the tilt cord 368. Slippage between the tilt-cord spool-member 391 and the convolutions of tilt cord portion 368" will'permit continued rotation of the crank 410 to raise (or lower) the blind if that be desired.

The friction drive provided by the tilt-cord spoolmember 391 serves as a brake also. The slats 341 having been tilted to any desired extent or left untilted, and the crank 410 released, fortuitous rotation of the crank 410 and shaft 393 is obviated by a brake which will be explained. The friction drive provided by the tilt-cord spool-member 391 now serves as a brake; it prevents fortuitous longitudinal movement of the tilt cord 368, thereby preventing fortuitous tilting movement of the slats 341. k

To raise or lower the blind the cord 378 is reeled in or payed out by the lift-cord spool-member 392 which is part of the shaft 393. Full tilting of the slats 341 is effected by a relatively small amount of rotative movement of the tilt-cord spool-member 391, and thereupon further tilting movement of the tilt cord 368 is brought to a halt as has been explained. During such full tilting of the slats 341 the lift-cord spool-member 392 effects only insignificant raising or lowering of the slats as a result of rotation of the crank 410 and shaft 393 to tilt the slats. Sufficient continued rotation of the crank 410 and shaft 393 effects the reeling in or paying out of cord 37817 which is needed for whatever raising or low-' ering of the blind that is desired. The crank 410 is a common operator for rotating the tilt-cord and lift-cord spool-members 391 and 392, and the crank is in continuous torque-imparting relation to both of these spool members. The tilt and lift cord spool-members 391 are in continuous cord-operating relation to the tilt and lift cords and afford movement of these cords so long as they are free to move.

As the tilt cord portion 368" is driven by the spool member 391 an end convolution of the cordportion 368" may move against the cheek 394 or 395. Moving against the cheek 394 or substantially against it, the end convolution drops into peripherial groove 391a (FIG. 20); this inhibits the next-to-the-end convolution from moving under the end convolution, which could start the convolutions piling up against the cheek 394. Similarly if the convolution at the opposite end moves substantially against the cheek 395; that end convolution then drops into the peripherial groove 39112.

As the cord 37812 is reeled in by the spool member 392 it can be expected to move closely adjacent'to cheek 395 at times and closely adjacent to cheek 396 at other times. These cheeks are provided with hemispherical projections 395b and 396 which, when the cord 37817 moves closely adjacent to the cheeks, strikes the eord and pushes it away to thereby inhibit the cord from piling up against the cheek.

The bearing block 400 may be made of suitable metal or plastic, hard nylon being presently preferred. The spool cheek 396 confronts the inner flat face of the bearing block, being separated therefrom by a friction disc or washer 397. A flat-faced clamping nut 303 is threaded onto the shaft 393 from the outer end of the shaft and confronts the flat outer face of the bearing block 400, being separated therefrom by a friction disc or washer 398. The friction discs or washers 397 and 3.98 are brake means which impose a drag upon the rotation of the crank 410 and the shaft 393. When the crank is released after partially or fully raising the blind, the drag imposed by the friction discs 397 and 398 prevents reverse rotation of the shaft 393 and crank 410 and thereby obviates fortuitous lowering of the blind, i.e., the ladder-and-slat assembly thereof, due to its weight.

The friction discs or washers 397 and 398 are each of suitable type and made of suitable material. At least one of these washers, for example the washer 398, is of a type which affords resilient yielding in an axial direction to a marked extent when the washer is axially loaded. By sufficiently tightening the clamping nut 303 and locking it with the nut 304 thedises or washers 397 and 398 are axially loaded and held loaded to the extent needed to cause the drag which they exert to be sufficient to obviate fortuitous lowering of the blind, even when the blind isfully raised.

The nut 305 is tightened against the outer face of nylon crank arm 410a and locked by nut 306. Sufficient clamping pressure is applied by nut 305 to obviate slippage between the crank arm 410a and the shaft 393 while the blind is being fully raised. However, this clamping pressure is set low enough to enable the crank to slip in the event that rotation of the crank 410 be forcibly continued after the blind has been fully raised. Thus the clamped inner end of the crank arm 410a constitutes a friction drive which protects the lift cords of the blind against breakage in the event of forcible continued rotation of the crank after the blind has been fully raised.

As cord for the tilt cords and the lift-cord means of the blinds herein disclosed, use may be made of suitable non-metallic commercial cord of small diameter and high breaking strength. In this category braided cord such as is sometimes used for fishing lines, having a diameter of approximately 0.050 inch and which is scarcely stretchable, is presently preferred. However, the slats of the blind may fail to maintain parallelism if the tilt cord undergoes slight stretch in the eyeletcarrying portion thereof, to which the ladders are attached; and objectionable stretch in the eyelet-carrying portion of the tilt cord is likely to occur in the case of a blind which is tall and heavy and/or has long slats requiring more than two ladders, for example four or more ladders. As protection against objectionable stretch in the eyelet-carrying portion of the tilt cord, it is preferred that this portion of the tilt cord be made of metal; finely stranded stainless steel is preferred at present for the eyelet-carrying portion 368'. Alternatively the eyelet-carrying portion 368' of the tilt cord may be partly non-metallic, having core strands or other strands which are of metal.

With a blind which has a very heavy ladder-and-slat assembly it is likely that there will be heavy upward pull at times on the lift cord spool. To better support the shaft 393 in case of heavy upward pull, an end bearing 393a (FIG. 20) may be provided for the shaft. The bearing 393a is mounted in any suitable manner on the rear wall of the jamb channel 383.

FIGS. 2224 show an additional installation in which the Venetian blind, i.e., the ladder-and-slat assembly thereof, is between glazings. Vertical and horizontal breaks are used to keep these figures to manageable size. The outer framing and its glazings are indicated, fragmentarily, in phantom lines in FIG. 23 and are omitted in FIGS. 22 and 24. The blind is shown sketchily, being the blind of FIGS. 20 and 21 with the cord connector 321 omitted. Various reference characters have been carried over from FIGS. 20 and 21 and most of the same will be referred to. The window framing is fabricated aluminum framing having an inner glazing 800 that is mounted in and suitably sealed to inner framing 803, and having an outer glazing 801 that is mounted in and suitably sealed to outer framing 802. The outer framing 802 lines the opening in the building wall (not shown). The window frame may be opened, the inner framing 803 being so hinged at 804 to the outer framing 802 that the inner framing may be swung inwardly for access to the space between the glazings. The head 344 of the blind is attached to the lintel 830 of the inner framing and, therefore, the blind swings inwardly with the inner framing when the window frame is opened. When the window frame is closed the inner framing 803 is sealedto the outer framing 802 by a gasket 805 which is similar to the gasket on a refrigerator door and which extends entirely around the inner face of the framing, close to the outer edge thereof.

The window opening is designated by 829 in FIGS. 22 and 23. The lintel 830 of the inner framing 803 ex tends horizontally adjacent to the top of the window opening. Jamb channels 831, 831 (FIG. 23) extend vertically downward from the opposite ends of the lintel 830, these jamb channels being part of the fabricated structure of the inner framing 803. The two jamb channels are alike except for being of opposite hand; and their cross sectional configuration will be best under' stood from the left-hand jamb channel in FIG. 23, that jamb channelbeing empty. Each of the jamb channels affords a vertical passageway at 831a that is separated from the window opening 829 by a jamb wall 83lb.

Screws pass vertically upward through the head channel 345 of the blind and are threaded into the lintel 830, thereby securing the head of the blind to the lintel. One screw 835 is shown adjacent to the lefthand end of the head channel in FIG. 22, and another screw 835 is shown adjacent to the opposite end of the head channel in FIG. 24. However any appropriate number of screws may be used, adjacent to the ends of the head channel and also in intervening positions along its length. At a level corresponding to the level of the head 344 of the blind there is a rectangular entrance 8310 (FIGS. 22 and 24) through the jamb wall 83lb that is on the right-hand side of the window opening in FIG. 22. The cord-guide unit 356 (see FIG. 22) projects through the entrance 831s and guides the tilt and lift cords 368 and 378 (FIG. 22) between horizontal runs lengthwise of the head 344 and vertical runs in the vertical passageway 831a (FIG. 23) afforded by the right-hand jamb channel 831. The cord-operating means 390 is mounted on the right-hand jamb channel 831 and extends into the associated vertical passage- 25 way 831a at a lower level, the tilt and lift cords being connected thereto and operated thereby as explained in connection with FIGS. and 21.

In the installation of FIGS. 22-24 a single length of cord is used for the tilt cord connection from eyelets E and E (FIG. 20) to the cord-operating unit 390. This single length of cord provides the confronting end portions at 368d and 368e in FIG. 24, which are pulled toward each other to draw the tilt cord taut and are then united by the connector 322 in the manner that has already been explained.

Each blind herein disclosed is thin, and is well suited for combination with a doubleglazed window. The slats may be 1 inch wide and the head channel may be 1 inch wide and three-eighth's inch high. Suitable known materials are used throughout. Rolled aluminum slats are presently preferred for the ladder-andslat assembly of the blind. Rolled sheet steel is presently preferred for the head channel and bottom bar.

Stamped sheet steel is presently preferred for the bodies of the cordguide units that are affixed to the head channel. Standard components are used where applicable. I I

See my application Ser. No. 269,372 filed July 6, 1972 for additional disclosure concerning the Venetian blind of FIGS. 20 and 21','the cord connectors 321 and protection of the tilt cord against breakage.

I claim:

1. A Venetian blind installation in which (a) a window opening has a lintel along its top and jambs along its vertical edges, (b) at least one of the jambs affords a vertical passageway that is separated from the window opening by a jamb wall, (c) a ladder-and-slat assembly is within the window opening, being suspended from a head which extends lengthwise of the lintel, and (d) the ladders are connected to horizontal runs ofa tilt cord, which runs extend lengthwise of the head-- wherein the improvement comprises:

an entrance leading into or in alignment with said vertical passageway, at a level corresponding to the level of the head, cord-operating means which is jamb mounted and extends into said vertical passageway at a lower level,

cord-guide means which is part of said head and which projects through said entrance,

said cord-guide means guiding the tilt cord between the horizontal runs lengthwisev of the head and vertical runs in said vertical passageway,

and a driving connection between the cord-operating means and the tilt cord to shift the tilt cord lengthwise of itself and tilt the slats of the blind in response to operation of the cord-operating means.

2. A Venetian blind installation as in claim 1 in which the head includes a head channel that is mounted contiguous to the lintel and embraces the horizontal runs 26 of the tilt cord-wherein the improvement additionally comprises:

a cord-guide unit is affixed to said head channel and projects beyond the end thereof, and such cordguide unit provides said cord-guide means that guides the tilt cord between the horizontal runs lengthwise of the head and vertical runs in said vertical passageway.

3. A Venetian blind installation as in claim 1 wherein the improvement additionally comprises:

slippage is provided at the cord-operating means upon full tilting of the slats being reached.

4. A Venetian blind installation as in claim 1 wherein the improvement additionally comprises:

cord means, which functions as part of the tilt cord, operatively connects the horizontal runs of the tilt cord with the cord-operating means,

said cord means including (a) confronting cord portions which can be pulled toward each other to draw the tilt cord taut, and (b) a quick connector for functionally uniting the eonfronting cord porf tions after the tilt cord has been drawn taut.

5. A Venetian blind installation as in claim 4 wherein the improvement additionally comprises:

the quick connector affords quick release of the confronting cord portions for re-adju'str'n'ent and quick reconnection of the confronting cord portions in re-adjusted relation.

6. A Venetian blind installation as in claim 1 wherein the improvement additionally comprises:

the cord-operating means and the tilt cord driving connection, considered jointly, include a friction drive to the tilt cord.

7. A Venetian blind installation as in claim 6 wherein the improvement additionally comprises:

the friction drive is a spool member about which cord is .wra'pped a plurality of convolutions.

8. A Venetian blind installation as in claim 7 wherein the improvement additionally comprises:

in each direction axially from the convolutions of the cord, the spool member is provided with a peripherial' groove into which the end convolution drops when the end convolution shifts axially thereto.

9. A Venetian blind having a ladder-and-slat assembl'y suspended beneath a support, and having the ladders connected to a tilt cord which extends horizontally adjacent to the support and is shiftable lengthwise of itself to tilt the slats, the shifting of the tilt cord being in response to rotation of a tilt-cord spool-member to which the tilt cord is operatively connectedwherein the'improvement comprises:

the tilt cord is wound a plurality of convolutions about the spool member and is in slip relation to the spool member, whereby, once full tilting of the slats has been effected, continued rotation of the tilt-cord spool-member is afforded without further movement of the tilt cord and with consequent protcction of the tilt cord against breakage.

10. A Venetian blind as in claim 9 in which there are cheeks at the opposite ends of the tilt-cord spoolmemberwherein the improvement additionally comprises: two peripherial grooves on the spool member, each groove being companion to one of the cheeks and contiguous thereto whereby, when an end convolution of the tilt cord moves closely adjacent to a cheek, the end convolution drops into the companion peripherial

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3443624 *Aug 10, 1967May 13, 1969Anchor Enterprises CorpVenetian blind window
US3703920 *Jan 28, 1970Nov 28, 1972Levolor Lorentzen IncVenetian blind and installation
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4865108 *Jul 7, 1988Sep 12, 1989Hunter Douglas International N.V.Frame for a retractable blind
US5379825 *Aug 26, 1993Jan 10, 1995Verosol Usa Inc.Window blind between two panes of glass
US5611381 *Nov 8, 1995Mar 18, 1997Verosol Usa Inc.Window having a blind between two panes of glass
US5839492 *Apr 14, 1997Nov 24, 1998Young; Hai TeeWindow apparatus with built in shading device
US5996668 *Aug 14, 1998Dec 7, 1999Odl, IncorporatedAdjustable blind assembly
US6006813 *Mar 7, 1997Dec 28, 1999Oem Shades, Inc.Window having a blind between two panes of glass
US6070638 *Jun 23, 1999Jun 6, 2000Oem Shades, Inc.Window having a blind between two panes of glass
US6328090 *Oct 13, 2000Dec 11, 2001Hunter Douglas Inc.Framed covering for architectural opening
US6601633Oct 4, 2001Aug 5, 2003Odl, IncorporatedInsulated glass blind assembly
US6644373Nov 8, 2001Nov 11, 2003Newell Window Furnishings, Inc.Cordless blind
US6644374 *Jun 14, 2002Nov 11, 2003Nien Made Enterprise Co., Ltd.Venetian blind that keeps lift cords concealed
US6782937 *Oct 3, 2001Aug 31, 2004Hunter Douglas Inc.Framed covering for architectural opening
US6802356 *Jan 31, 2003Oct 12, 2004Shih-Ming LinWindow blind having a restrainable bottom rail
US6817401Oct 10, 2002Nov 16, 2004Odl, IncorporatedRetrofit doorlight blind assembly
US6932139Aug 6, 2003Aug 23, 2005Odl, IncorporatedInsulated glass window blind
US6957680Oct 16, 2002Oct 25, 2005Hunter Douglas Inc.Framed covering for architectural opening
US7082982Jun 28, 2004Aug 1, 2006Odl, IncorporatedRetrofit doorlight blind assembly
US8376019 *Jan 6, 2006Feb 19, 2013Pella CorporationWindow assembly with movable interior sash
US8540006Jan 10, 2013Sep 24, 2013SAFE-T-SHADE, Inc.Apparatuses, systems and methods for locking lift cords used to lift architectural opening coverings
US8763671Dec 22, 2010Jul 1, 2014Safe-T-ShadeCordless covering for architectural opening
US8881456 *Feb 27, 2012Nov 11, 2014Peng XuShading devices
US8950463Apr 26, 2011Feb 10, 2015Safe-T-ShadeCordless coverings for architectural opening having cord enclosures with a swivel feature and methods of assembling such cord enclosures
US8967226Dec 22, 2010Mar 3, 2015Safe-T-ShadeArchitectural cover operating assembly
US9149143Sep 9, 2013Oct 6, 2015Safe-T-ShadeApparatuses, systems and methods for locking lift cords used to lift architectural opening coverings
US9151110Apr 26, 2011Oct 6, 2015Safe-T-ShadeCordless blind systems having cord enclosures with a swivel feature and methods of assembling such cord enclosures
US9187952Feb 25, 2011Nov 17, 2015Safe-T-ShadeCordless blind system and retro-fit method
US20040149398 *Jan 31, 2003Aug 5, 2004Shih-Ming LinWindow blind having a restrainable bottom rail
US20040221966 *Jun 17, 2004Nov 11, 2004Hunter Douglas Inc.Framed covering for architectural opening
US20040238131 *Jun 28, 2004Dec 2, 2004Eveland Mike S.Retrofit doorlight blind assembly
US20050028944 *Aug 6, 2003Feb 10, 2005Early Keith P.Insulated glass window blind
US20050081463 *Oct 17, 2003Apr 21, 2005Richard AllenRetractable screen system providing a positioning force for a movable sash
US20060150561 *Jan 6, 2006Jul 13, 2006Pella CorporationWindow assembly with movable interior sash
US20110146429 *Dec 22, 2010Jun 23, 2011Safe-T-ShadeArchitectural cover operating assembly
US20110146918 *Dec 22, 2010Jun 23, 2011Safe-T-ShadeCordless covering for architectural opening
US20120216964 *Feb 27, 2012Aug 30, 2012Peng XuShading devices
US20150211292 *Jan 23, 2015Jul 30, 2015Nien Made Enterprise Co., Ltd.Window blind
US20160060955 *Aug 25, 2015Mar 3, 2016Yin-An HsiehRetractable light-diffusing module and light-diffusing structure thereof
EP0228477A1 *Dec 27, 1985Jul 15, 1987Hunter Douglas Industries B.V.Contractible protection device
EP0984131A1 *Aug 30, 1999Mar 8, 2000Glas Schuler GmbH & Co. KGDarkening and light-deflecting system
WO2012149015A1 *Apr 25, 2012Nov 1, 2012Safe-T-ShadeCordless blind systems having cord enclosures with a swivel feature and methods of assembling such cord enclosures
Classifications
U.S. Classification160/168.10R, 160/107
International ClassificationE06B9/28, E06B9/322, E06B9/326, E06B9/26, E06B9/264, E06B9/303
Cooperative ClassificationE06B9/303, E06B9/326, E06B9/264, E06B9/322
European ClassificationE06B9/322, E06B9/326, E06B9/303, E06B9/264