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Publication numberUS3795400 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 5, 1974
Filing dateDec 27, 1971
Priority dateDec 27, 1971
Also published asDE2262146A1
Publication numberUS 3795400 A, US 3795400A, US-A-3795400, US3795400 A, US3795400A
InventorsDunn K, Glass M
Original AssigneeMarvin Glass & Associates
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game device
US 3795400 A
Abstract
A game wherein the participants seek to avoid destroying an object such as a rupturable or puncturable balloon. The game includes a plurality of playing pieces, a rupturable object such as a balloon, a balloon retainer, a pan to be disposed on top of the balloon for carrying the playing pieces therein, the pan having an elongated member extending downwardly from the bottom of the pan and a chance device for determining the number of playing pieces to be deposited in the pan. The pan is held spaced from the balloon by a helical spring surrounding the elongated member. As weight is added to the pan the elongated member is forced against the balloon against the bias of the spring and eventually the balloon bursts.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

nited States Patent [1 1' Glass et al.

[451 Mar. 5, 1974 GAME DEVICE Inventors: Marvin 1. Glass; Kathy A. Dunn,

both of Chicago, Ill.

[73] Assignee: Marvin Glass & Associates,

Chicago, Ill.

[22] Filed: Dec. 27, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 212,025

[52] US. Cl. 273/1 R, 46/88 [51] Int. Cl. A63f 9/00 [58] Field of Search 273/1 R,,l E, l M, 138 R; 46/194, 88

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,685,825 8/1972 Dorazio..... 273/1 R I 3,589,723 6/1971 Glass et al..... 273/] R 3,589,724 6/1971 Barlow et al.. 273/1 R 3,460,83l 8/1969 Glass et al..... 273/] R 3,387,846 6/1968 Glass et al 273/1 R X Primary Examiner-Richard C. Pinkham Assistant'Examiner-Paul E. Shapiro Attorney, Agent, or FirmCoffee & Sweeney [5 7 ABSTRACT A game wherein the participants seek to avoid destroying an object such as a rupturable or puncturable balloon. The game includes a plurality of playing pieces, a rupturable object such as a balloon, a balloon retainer, a pan to be disposed on top of the balloon for carrying the playing pieces therein, the pan having an elongated member extending downwardly from the bottom of the pan and a chance device for determining the number of playing pieces to be deposited in the pan. The pan is held spaced from the balloon by a helical spring surrounding the elongated member. As weight is added to the pan the elongated member is forced against the balloon against the bias of the'spring and eventually the balloon bursts.

11 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures iii In I GAME DEVICE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to games and amusement devices.

2. Brief Description of the Prior Art Games requiring that playing pieces or the like be cumulatively placed by a player onto another object which is unstable is well known in the art. The object of this kind of game is to prevent the temporarily stable object from becoming unstable. Instability may be manifested by the loss of part of the object or the physical displacement of the entire object. This kind of game requires skill in placement of the playing pieces and, at the same time, has an element of chance when predicting when the unstable condition will occur.

None of these games described above has as its object the prevention of the destruction of the'object. That is, none of the games utilize the destructible nature of an object as a chance element in the game.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The principal object of this invention is to provide a new and entertaining cumulative playing piece deposit type of game wherein the object is to place a number of weighted playing pieces on a destructible object without destroying the same. More particularly, the object of this invention is to utilize the destructible nature of an object as a chance element in a game.

The best mode currently contemplated for carrying out this invention includes a plurality of weighted playing pieces, a destructible object, a gravity actuated force applicator mounted on top of the destructible object for applying the weight of playing pieces thereagainst, and a chance device for indicating the amount 2--2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken generally along the 7 line 33 of FIG. 2; and

of weight in the form of the number-of playing pieces to be applied by the force applicator. The force applicator has a receiving portion for carryingplaying pieces therein and a contact portion for contacting and deforming the destructible object. The force applicator moves against the destructible object in response to the weight of the playing pieces carried in the receiving portion thereby deforming the destructible object. The destructible object is destroyed whenever the number of playing pieces in the receiving portion is of a sufficient weight to cause deformation of the destructible I object beyond its deformation limit.

In the preferred embodiment the destructible object is a rupturable or puncturable object. The contact portion is an elongated member attached to the receiving portion and is directed toward the rupturable object by means of a guide. The force applicator includes means for spacing the elongated member away from the rupturable object whenever the receiving portion is empty. The spacing means also offers resistance to the weight of the playing pieces when they are deposited in the receiving portion. The resistant effect of the spacing means must first be overcome by the weight of the playing pieces deposited in the receiving portion before the elongated member comes in contact with the rupturable object.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. I is a perspective view ofthe game of this invention;

FIG. 4 is a plan view of the chance device used in association with the game of this invention.

While this invention is susceptible of embodiment in many different forms, there is shown in the drawings and will herein be described in detail a specific embodiment therefor, with the understanding that the present disclosure is to be considered as an exemplification of the principles of the invention and is not intended to limit the invention to the embodiment illustrated.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Turning to FIGS. 1 and 2, the game of this invention, generally designated 10, is seen to include a destructible object, preferably in the form of a rupturable balloon 12 which is intended to be inlfated and held by a balloon holder 14. The balloon holder 14 is a vertical open-ended hollow cylinder made out of plastic or cardboard in the form of a simulated face. A vertical slot 16 is cut out in the front of the holder 14 to receive the neck 18 of the balloon 12. Thus, the balloon I2 is captured in the slot 16 between the mouth 20 of the balloon l2 and the rest of the body of the balloon. The balloon is force-fit into the cylindrical holder 14 so that the balloon will be relatively stable and not subject to any significant movement.

A generally cylindrical guide 22 in the form ofa simulated hat and having an open end 24 rests on the top surface 26 of the balloon 12. A gravity actuated force applicator, generally designated 28, is mounted for vertical movement within the guide 22 and is utilized for applying weight against the balloon 12.

The force applicator 28 includes a receiving portion or means, in the form of a circular pan 30 having an upwardly facing concave surface 32 adapted to receive a plurality ofspherical playing pieces 34 therein. The underside of the pan 30 has a contact portion or means here shown in the form of an elongated member 36 secured to its underside. The elongated member 36 has an abrasive cap 38 secured to its free end which is intended to contact the top surface 26 of the balloon 12.

Spacing means in the form ofa spiral or helical spring 40 is also secured to the underside of the pan 30 concentric with the elongated member 36. The spring 40 rests upon the top surface 26 of the balloon 12 allowing a space between the abrasive cap 38 and the top surface 26 whenever there is relatively little weight in the pan 30 as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. The spring 40 also offers a resisting'force to the weight of any playing pieces 34 in the pan 30.

When no playing pieces 34 are in the pan 30, the force applicator 28 is in the starting position whereby the level of the pan is approximately equal withthe top of the cylindrical guide 22 and the abrasive cap 38 is spaced from the top surface 26 of the balloon 12. As more weight is added, the spring 40 is compressed and the elongated member is moved closer to the top surface 26 until the abrasive cap 38 engages the balloon defining the "contact position." The addition of more weight to the pan 30 after the force applicator 28 reaches the contact position will cause the elongated member 36, and specifically the abrasive cap 38,

to deform the balloon 12 at the top surface 26 until a sufficient amount of weight causes rupturing of the balloon.

The outside diameter of the pan 30 is slightly less than the inside diameter of the cylindrical guide 22. Notches 42 are provided around the periphery of the pan 30 so that as the pan is moved downwardly in the cylindrical guide 22 toward the balloon due to the weight of the playing pieces 34, the air which is compressed by such action is allowed to escape through the top of the cylindrical guide 22.

A chance device 44, shown in FIG. 4, is used in association with this game to determine the number of playing pieces and. therefore, the amount of weight that is to be placed in the pan 30. The chance device 44 used in this embodiment is a spinner which points at different numbers placed around the spinner. Each number is representative ofa quantum of weight as represented by the playing pieces 34. The chance area designated pass is representative of no weight at all.

The playing pieces 34 as used in the game described herein, are marbles of substantially equal weight. Therefore. each number on the chance device 44 would be representative of the number of marbles or playing pieces 34 which are to be deposited in the pan. It is intended that it would take the weight of much more than two playing pieces to cause puncturing of the balloon 12. If the playing pieces were of different weights the numbers on the chance device 44 could then be representative of the amount of weight rather than the number of units.

The play of the game is very simple and may be enjoyed by as many players as is desired. The game commences when the force applicator 28 is at the starting position. Each player takes a turn at the chance device and places the number of playing pieces or marbles 34 in the pan 30 as dictated by the chance device 44. As the game continues a greater amount of weight is placed in the pan 30 which, in turn, causes a greater amount of weight to be exerted against the spring 40 and, subsequently, the balloon 12. When a sufficient amount of weight is received in the pan 30, the balloon l2 will burst. The player who placed the playing piece which resulted in destruction of the balloon 12 is eliminated from the game. if more than one player is participating, the game is repeated as above described until everyone is eliminated but one player who is declared the winner.

Not only is this game exciting in that there is an element of mystery in waiting for the balloon to burst, but also there is a slight degree of skill involved. The manner in which the playing pieces 34 are placed in the pan 30 may have a bearing on whether or not the balloon will burst at that particular time. If the balloon 12 is greatly deformed. and a player drops his playing pieces in the pan 30 there is a greater chance that the balloon will burst than if he were to gently place them in the pan 30.

The foregoing detailed description has been given for clearness of understanding only and no unnecessary limitations should be understood therefrom as some modifications will be obvious to those skilled in the art.

We claim:

I. A game device comprising:

a plurality of playing pieces each having substantially the same weight;

a rupturable object made of deformable material capable of being ruptured whenever an excessive weight is brought to bear on a relatively small area thereof;

an upwardly facing concave circular pan on top of the rupturable object for carrying the playing pieces;

an elongated member attached to the bottom of said pan and extending downwardly therefrom for exerting the weight of the playing pieces in said pan against a relatively small area of the rupturable object, said pan and elongated member being associated with the rupturable object for movement thereagainst in response to the weight of the playing pieces carried in the pan whereby the rupturable object is deformed;

guiding means to direct the elongated member towards the rupturable object;

a resilient helical spring mounted between the bottom of the pan and the rupturable object and surrounding the elongated member, said spring spacing the elongated member away from the rupturable object when the elongated member is in a starting position wherein the pan is empty and resisting the effect of the weight of the playing pieces when deposited in said pan before deformation of the rupturable object occurs; and

a chance device for indicating the number of playing pieces which are to be deposited in the pan by a player, whereby the rupturable object is ruptured by the elongated member whenever the number of playing pieces in the pan is sufficient to cause deformation of the rupturable object beyond its rupture limit.

2. The game device of claim 1 wherein said playing pieces are marbles.

3. The game device of claim 1 wherein said guiding means includes an open ended cylinder mounted on top of the rupturable object for receiving the circular pan, elongated member and spring therein, the diameter of the cylinder being slightly greater than the diameter of the pan, whereby the relative motion of the pan in the cylinder resembles that of a piston.

4. The game device of claim 1 wherein the rupturable object is an inflated balloon.

5. The game device of claim 4 including means to support the balloon.

6. A game device comprising:

a plurality of playing pieces, each having a quantum of weight associated therewith;

a rupturable object made of deformable material capable of being ruptured whenever an excessive weight is exerted thereon;

an open ended hollow cylindrical housing mounted on top of the rupturable object;

a gravity actuated piston-like force applicator in the form of an upwardly facing concave circular pan mounted in said housing for reciprocal up and down movement for receiving and carrying playing pieces with an elongated member extending downwardly from the bottom of the pan for contacting and deforming the rupturable object, said pan being movable against the rupturabl object in response to the weight of playing pieces carried in the receiving portion whereby the rupturable object may be deformed;

a resilient helical spring mounted between the bottom of the pan and the rupturable object and surrounding the elongated member for resisting the downward movement of the pan caused by the weight of playing pieces deposited in the pan. whereby the pan moves from a non-contacting starting position spaced from the rupturable object to a contact position therewith in response to the weight of the playing pieces carried in the receiving portion before deformation of the rupturable object occurs; and

a chance device for indicating the amount of weight in the form of playing pieces which is to be deposited in the pan by a player, whereby the rupturable object is ruptured by the weight applied by the force applicator whenever the weight of the playing pieces in the pan is sufficient to cause deformation of the rupturable object beyond its deformation limit.

7. A game device comprising, in combination:

a base structure for receiving and holding a balloon type rupturable member;

a rupturable balloon type member positionable on said base structure;

a support member positioned on top of said balloon member when the latter is positioned on said base structure;

a rupturing member movably mounted on and guided by said support member for movement toward and away from the balloon member for rupturing the balloon member when in contact therewith with sufficient force; and

means to resist relative movement between said rupturing member and said support member so as to require a progressively increasing force on the rup turing member toward the balloon member to move the rupturing member into contact with the balloon member when the support member is positioned on top of the balloon member, said means being mountedbelow the top of and within the support member.

8. The game device of claim 7 wherein said support member comprises the piston portion and said rupturing member comprises the. cylinder portion of a piston and cylinder device.

9. The game device of claim 8 wherein said cylinder portion is open ended with one open end forming an aperture for positioning of the device on top of the balloon member and with the other open end forming re ceptacle means through which objects may be inserted into position on top of said piston to increase the weight on the piston for moving the same toward the balloon member.

10. The game device of claim 9 including, in combination, a plurality of marble-like objects for positioning on top of said piston through said other open end of said cylinder.

11. The game device of claim 8 including an elongated rupturing element protruding from the underside of said piston.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3387846 *Feb 28, 1966Jun 11, 1968Marvin Glass & AssociatesWheeled toy and target rings
US3460831 *Feb 9, 1967Aug 12, 1969Marvin Glass & AssociatesAssembling and balancing skill game
US3589723 *Dec 3, 1968Jun 29, 1971Marvin Glass & AssociatesDevice with depending tray
US3589724 *Dec 5, 1968Jun 29, 1971Marvin Glass & AssociatesGame with tower and crane
US3685825 *Apr 1, 1971Aug 22, 1972John D Del PontiBalloon bursting game apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4036493 *Oct 23, 1975Jul 19, 1977Marvin Glass & AssociatesGame apparatus
US4043554 *Oct 27, 1976Aug 23, 1977Tobin WolfWeight game
US4169593 *May 12, 1978Oct 2, 1979Wood Arthur RBalloon bursting game
US4171806 *Jan 16, 1978Oct 23, 1979Benkoe ErwinPlay apparatus
US4201387 *Aug 18, 1978May 6, 1980Mike RevermannBalloon buster game
US4826161 *Jul 31, 1987May 2, 1989Tom Franklin FikkertBalloon game
US4881733 *Mar 14, 1988Nov 21, 1989C&S Distributing Co.Balloon popping mechanism
US4890838 *Jan 23, 1989Jan 2, 1990Elliot RudellTimed water release toy
US4900020 *Mar 16, 1988Feb 13, 1990C&S Distributing Co.Balloon popping mechanism
US4991847 *Nov 13, 1989Feb 12, 1991Elliot RudellTimed water release toy
US5984788 *Jun 9, 1997Nov 16, 1999Toymax Inc.Interactive toy shooting game having a target with a feelable output
US6261180Feb 6, 1998Jul 17, 2001Toymax Inc.Computer programmable interactive toy for a shooting game
US6302796Jan 29, 1998Oct 16, 2001Toymax Inc.Player programmable, interactive toy for a shooting game
US6402582 *Sep 18, 2000Jun 11, 2002Ronald B. ShererMechanical balloon bursting systems
US6699097Feb 9, 2001Mar 2, 2004Elliot RudellToys with timer-activated controllable operation time
US7487972 *Nov 14, 2007Feb 10, 2009Benchmark Entertainment L.C.Balloon amusement game
US8257134 *Jan 19, 2010Sep 4, 2012Steve ZuloffGame device and method thereof
US20110177749 *Jan 19, 2010Jul 21, 2011Steve ZuloffGame device and method thereof
WO1990007961A1 *Dec 18, 1989Jul 26, 1990Elliot RudellGame and ball with water-releasing device
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/458, 273/450, 446/220
International ClassificationA63F9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F9/0079, A63F2009/0084
European ClassificationA63F9/00N