Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3795830 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 5, 1974
Filing dateAug 17, 1972
Priority dateAug 17, 1972
Publication numberUS 3795830 A, US 3795830A, US-A-3795830, US3795830 A, US3795830A
InventorsJ Richardson
Original AssigneeShelton J, Garrett J, Johnson R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Led slidebase switchboard lamp
US 3795830 A
Abstract
A light-emitting diode slidebase switchboard lamp having an LED at one end of an elongated sheath and a rigid, non-conducting base at the other. A resistor and a rectifier positioned in the sheath in axial alignment, each connected to the LED and to terminals positioned along the outside of the sheath. The terminals are cemented to the sheath and have end portions embedded in the base.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 I Richardson 1 LED SLIDEBASE SWITCHBOARD LAMP [75] Inventor: John L. Richardson, Cern'tos, Calif.

[73] Assignees: Jim C. Garrett, Long Beach; Robert H. Johnson, Marine Del Ray; Jack Shelton, Long Beach, all of, Calif. part interest to each [22] Filed: Aug. 17, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 281,402

[51] Int. Cl. H03k 3/42 [58] Field of Search 313/108 D,.312, 324; 315/129, 315/130, 135; 324/133; 307/311 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,534,354 10/1970 3,430,054 2/1969 3,609,475 9/1971 3,696.263 10/1972 Wacher 313/108 D [451 Mar. 5, 1974 3,659,159 4/1972 Nagata 307/311 X 2,956,229 10/1960 Hener 3,697,802 10/1972 Demas 315/135 X OTHER PUBLICATIONS Sunners, Mount for Light Omitting Diode, IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, December 1965, p. 1015 Primary Examiner-Herman Karl Saalbach Assistant Examinen-James B. Mullins Attorney, Agent, or FirmAlbert L. Gabriel [57] ABSTRACT A light-emitting diode slidebase switchboard lamp having an LED at one end of an elongated sheath and a rigid, non-conducting base at the other. A resistor and a rectifier positioned in the sheath in axial alignment, each connected to the LED and to terminals positioned along the outside of the sheath. The terminals are cemented to the sheath and have end portions embedded in the base.

10 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PATENTEDHAR 5W 3.795.830

Dl/HL CHIP LED.

LED SLIDEBASE SWITCHBOARD LAMP BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION .subscriber complains to the operator that his phone is not being connected on outgoing calls or if the operator cannot determine whose line is buzzing."

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is an object of the instant invention to provide a slidebase lamp utilizing a light-emitting diode in appropriate circuitry and encapsilated in a compact, nonbreakable assembly.

Another object is to provide a device with an extremely long life which is compatible with existing switchboard panel units without any modifications thereto.

Still a further object is to provide slidebase lamps wherein the necessary resistances, polarity diodes and light elements are all housed in the area allocated to the lamp alone in prior art devices.

The lamp of the instant invention includes a slidebase portion with a pair of terminals molded therein. The terminals are secured to a sheath in which is houseda resistor and a diode or full wave rectifier. The resistor and diode are each connected to the terminals and to a light-emitting diode (LED) which is encapsilated in an appropriately colored lens material.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The foregoing and other objects, features and advantages of the invention will become more apparent from the following detailed description and accompanying drawing wherein:

FIG. I is a side elevational view of the slidebase switchboard lamp of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged longitudinal sectional view through the slidebase lamp of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a transverse sectional view taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a circuit diagram of the slidebase switchboard lamp in accordance with FIGS. 1-3;

FIG. 5 is a circuit diagram of a modified circuit for the slidebase switchboard lamp; and

FIG. 6 is a circuit diagram of another modified circuit utilizing a dual chip LED.

- in accordance with the invention includes a rigid conventional plastic slidebase 1 formed by injection molding and having a central recess 2 therein. The structure i of a pointed end 2 and symmetrical sides is consistent with the existing receptables, and the unit is adapted to cooperate in existing lamp receptacles and lamp jack panels. At the opposite end of the device is a semiconductor light-emitting diode (LED) 5 surrounded by a colored glass or plastic material forming a lens of a selected color. The LED has a base 7 and a pair of conductors 9 and 11. Such diodes are commercially available, and two types of colored dome LEDs are shown in U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,596,136 and 3,609,475.

The base of the LED 7 is bonded to an end of a cylindrical plastic sheath or housing 13. Attached to the sheath 13 are a pair of contact terminals 15 and 17. The terminals have wing-shaped extension members 15' and 17' respectively and are secured by appropriate cement or adhesive material to the outside of the cylindrical sheath. The terminals 15 and 17 also have centrally extending end portions 19 and 21 respectively molded in the base 1. A load resistance 23 has one conductor 25 soldered to LED 9 and another conductor 27 soldered to portion 19. A diode 29 has a conductor 31 soldered to conductor 11 of the LED and a conductor 33 soldered to portion 21.

The resistance 23 is preferably in the order of a 1,200 ohm, 3-watt resistor. Alternatively, it can be two resistors to provide better heat dissipation. Also, it is possible that a resistance in the form of a substrate semiconductor or the like can be used to provide the proper voltage drop and heat distribution. A combination of any of the above can also be used.

It will be appreciated that the diode 29 and resistor 23 are positioned axially relative to one another so that the diode is not adversely affected by the heat from the resistor. Also, with the resistor 23 positioned adjacent terminal 15 and in view of its proximity to terminal 17, a certain amount of heat dissipation will be achieved. It is also possible to achieve the greatest utilization of space by axially positioning the diode and resistor within the sheath 13 in the manner illustrated in FIG.

, FIG. 4 illustrates the circuit of the structure seen in FIG. 2.

FIG. 5 illustrates another preferred embodiment using a full wave rectifier 35 in place of the single diode 29. Rectifier 35 will provide a non-polar type of device which can be used in place of the current glass. vacuum lamp. The rectifier with its diode elements, either individually or in integrated circuit form, are positioned in the sheath in place of diode 29.

It has been found that the instant slidebase lamp can have a projected useful life of 25 to 50 years; whereas the prior art glass vacuum variety has a useful life of only about 1,000 hours. The value of this vast time differential will be appreciated when one considers the cost of locating a glass vacuum lamp failure in a switchboard. With the instant type of device, the LED lamp may well outlast the switchboard in which it is used.

In operation, the end portions 19 and 21 of terminals 15 and 17 are molded into the base 1, and the LED conductors 9 and 11 are soldered to the conductors 25 and 31 of resistor 23 and diode 29, respectively. The sheath 13 is then slipped over the resistor and diode and bonded to the base 7 of LED 5. The sheath is inserted between the terminals 15 and 17, and conductors 27 and 33 are soldered to end portions 19 and 21 respectively. The entire device can then be inserted in the female receptacle of a switchboard indicator assembly in place of the currently used vacuum type light.

FIG. 6 illustrates an embodiment utilizing a dual chip LED 5 having pair of diode chips therein arranged parallel and in opposite polarity. Therefore, the device becomes nonpolar and can be used with either DC or AC. As is know in the art, the normal conducting mode for such devices involves a 1 /2 volt maximum voltage drop, whereby each chip in its conducting mode protects the other chip in its nonconducting mode. It will be appreciated that the two chips can both be of the same color or they may be of different colors to indicate polarity.

While one embodiment of the invention has been described, it will be understood that it is capable of many further modifications and this application is intended to cover any variations, uses or adaptions of the invention following in generahthe principles of the invention and including such departures from the present disclosure as come within knowledge or customary practice in the art to which the invention pertains, and as may be applied to the essential features hereinbefore set forth and fall within the scope of the invention or the limits of the appended claims.

What is claimed is: V

l. A slidebase lamp comprising;

a. an elongated housing;

b. a light-emitting semiconductor element on one end of said housing, c. a pair of elongated terminals outside of and substantially coaxial with said housing;

d. a resistor in said housing,

e. a rectifier in said housing,

f. said resistor, said rectifier, said element and said terminals being connected in series, and

g. said resistor and said rectifier being positioned substantially axially relative to each other in said housmg.

2. A slidebase lamp as defined in claim 1 wherein said rectifier is a single diode.

3. A slidebase lamp as defined in claim 1 wherein said rectifier is a full-wave rectifier.

4. A slidebase lamp as defined in claim 1 wherein said element is a light-emitting diode.

5. A slidebase lamp as defined in claim 1 including a rigid base positioned at one end of said housing and said element being positioned at the other end of said housing.

6. A slidebase lamp as defined in claim 5 wherein said terminals are connected to said base.

7. A slidebase lamp as defined in claim] wherein said housing is an elongated sheath.

8. A slidebase lamp as defined in claim 1 including a base positioned at one end of said sheath, and said element in the form of a light-emitting diode positioned at the other end thereof.

9. A slidebase lamp asdefined in claim 1 wherein said resistor is positioned closely adjacent at least one of said terminals.

10. A slidebase lamp as defined in claim 1 wherein said light-emitting element is encapsulated in a colored nonconducting material.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2956229 *Apr 27, 1959Oct 11, 1960Henel James LVoltage and polarity tester
US3430054 *Oct 22, 1965Feb 25, 1969Siemens AgApparatus for modulating direct voltages and currents
US3534354 *Jul 1, 1966Oct 13, 1970Gen ElectricDischarge indicator for rechargeable batteries
US3609475 *May 4, 1970Sep 28, 1971Hewlett Packard CoLight-emitting diode package with dual-colored plastic encapsulation
US3659159 *Oct 14, 1970Apr 25, 1972Minoru NagataOptoelectronic display panel
US3696263 *May 25, 1970Oct 3, 1972Gen Telephone & ElectSolid state light source with optical filter containing metal derivatives of tetraphenylporphin
US3697802 *Oct 12, 1970Oct 10, 1972Wagner Electric CorpTwo-terminal, two-color indicator lamp assembly
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *Sunners, Mount for Light Omitting Diode , IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, December 1965, p. 1015
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4035630 *Jun 26, 1975Jul 12, 1977Burke John GArticle of jewelry
US4054814 *Jun 14, 1976Oct 18, 1977Western Electric Company, Inc.Electroluminescent display and method of making
US4211955 *Mar 2, 1978Jul 8, 1980Ray Stephen WSolid state lamp
US4346329 *Sep 26, 1980Aug 24, 1982Schmidt Robert C HAiming post light
US4386818 *Apr 27, 1981Jun 7, 1983Amp IncorporatedPolarity indicating connector for battery jumper cables
US4514724 *Sep 28, 1982Apr 30, 1985Paul W. GarboElectrical warning system for malfunctions in refrigeration
US4939426 *Dec 11, 1989Jul 3, 1990United States Of AmericaLight emitting diode array
US5150510 *Dec 27, 1990Sep 29, 1992Mpc Containment Systems, Ltd.Method of manufacturing large scale membranes for covering extremely large areas
US5463280 *Mar 3, 1994Oct 31, 1995National Service Industries, Inc.Light emitting diode retrofit lamp
US5575459 *Apr 27, 1995Nov 19, 1996Uniglo Canada Inc.Light emitting diode lamp
US5726535 *Apr 10, 1996Mar 10, 1998Yan; EllisLED retrolift lamp for exit signs
US5897194 *May 14, 1996Apr 27, 1999Ham; Byung IlSign with remote power source tester
US6580228Aug 22, 2000Jun 17, 2003Light Sciences CorporationFlexible substrate mounted solid-state light sources for use in line current lamp sockets
US6709126Nov 22, 2002Mar 23, 2004Monte A. LeenLED nightlight
US6828728 *Dec 9, 2002Dec 7, 2004Samsung Sdi Co., Ltd.Device package with hermetically sealed cap
US7296913Jul 16, 2004Nov 20, 2007Technology Assessment GroupLight emitting diode replacement lamp
US7300173Dec 31, 2004Nov 27, 2007Technology Assessment Group, Inc.Replacement illumination device for a miniature flashlight bulb
US7318661Apr 8, 2004Jan 15, 2008Anthony CatalanoUniversal light emitting illumination device and method
US7448770Jul 31, 2007Nov 11, 2008Technology Assessment Group, Inc.Replacement illumination device for a miniature flashlight bulb
US7481570 *Jul 1, 2003Jan 27, 2009Leviton Manufacturing Co., Inc.Nightlight, LED power supply circuit, and combination thereof
US7597456Oct 5, 2007Oct 6, 2009Technology Assessment GroupLight emitting diode replacement lamp
US7699494Oct 2, 2008Apr 20, 2010Terralux, Inc.Replacement illumination device for a miniature flashlight bulb
US7777430Oct 30, 2007Aug 17, 2010Terralux, Inc.Light emitting diode replacement lamp
US7946730Aug 24, 2009May 24, 2011Terralux, Inc.Light emitting diode replacement lamp
US8033682Mar 3, 2010Oct 11, 2011Terralux, Inc.Replacement illumination device for an incandescent lamp
US8240873Sep 6, 2011Aug 14, 2012Terralux, Inc.Universal light emitting diode illumination device and method
US8297796Jul 31, 2009Oct 30, 2012Terralux, Inc.Adjustable beam portable light
US8328385Sep 6, 2011Dec 11, 2012Terralux, Inc.Universal light emitting diode illumination device and method
US8328386Sep 6, 2011Dec 11, 2012Terralux, Inc.Universal light emitting diode illumination device and method
US8400081Jul 12, 2010Mar 19, 2013Terralux, Inc.Light emitting diode replacement lamp
US8529088Jul 10, 2012Sep 10, 2013Terralux, Inc.Universal light emitting diode illumination device and method
US8632215Apr 25, 2011Jan 21, 2014Terralux, Inc.Light emitting diode replacement lamp
US8702275Dec 14, 2011Apr 22, 2014Terralux, Inc.Light-emitting diode replacement lamp
US8746930Dec 14, 2011Jun 10, 2014Terralux, Inc.Methods of forming direct and decorative illumination
US8823290Feb 13, 2013Sep 2, 2014Terralux, Inc.Light emitting diode replacement lamp
DE2613647A1 *Mar 31, 1976Oct 6, 1977Licentia GmbhSchaltungsanordnung
DE2648979A1 *Oct 28, 1976May 12, 1977Western Electric CoLichtemittierende wiedergabevorrichtung
WO1985005432A1 *May 13, 1985Dec 5, 1985Commw Of AustraliaA low-light miniature flash light
WO1986006191A1 *Apr 11, 1985Oct 23, 1986Walter J ValentineElectrical warning system for malfunctions in refrigeration
Classifications
U.S. Classification327/514, 313/324, 313/312, 315/135, 313/499, 313/512, 362/800
International ClassificationG08B5/36, F21S8/00
Cooperative ClassificationF21W2111/00, G08B5/36, Y10S362/80
European ClassificationG08B5/36
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 7, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: CMC TELECOM CORPORATION, LOS ANGELES, CA., A CORP.
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:COMMUNICATION MFG. COMPANY, A CORP. OF CA.;REEL/FRAME:004528/0480
Effective date: 19860205