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Publication numberUS3797065 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 19, 1974
Filing dateOct 29, 1971
Priority dateOct 29, 1971
Publication numberUS 3797065 A, US 3797065A, US-A-3797065, US3797065 A, US3797065A
InventorsHughes R
Original AssigneeChem Specialties Mfg Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Integrated foam extracting and rotary scrubbing machine
US 3797065 A
Abstract
A rotary scrubber of the type including a tubular frame member supported from the body of the scrubber and extending about and closely embracing a major portion of the lower periphery of the scrubbing member with the tubular frame member provided with underside air inlet openings and supported from the body of the rotary scrubber for floating gimbaled movement. The body of the rotary scrubber includes an upwardly projecting drive motor upon whose top or upper end a wet vacuum assembly is supported and the suction inlet for the wet vacuum is communicated with the interior of the tubular member in order that suds generated during a scrubbing action may be substantially immediately vacuumed from the surface of the article being scrubbed as the scrubber is orbited over that surface.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Hughes Mar. 19, 1974 INTEGRATED FOAM EXTRACTING AND ROTARY SCRUBBING MACHINE Robert R. Hughes, Lutherville, Md.

Chemical Specialties Manufacturing Corp., Baltimore, Md.

Filed: Oct. 29, 1971 Appl. No: 193,788

Inventor:

Assignee:

US. Cl. 15/353, 15/385 Int. Cl A47l 9/18 Field of Search 15/320, 353, 385

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3/1939 Longshore et 211...... 15/320 8/1972 Hughes et al. 15/320 X Primary ExaminerHarvey O. Hornsby Assistant Examiner-C. K. Moore Attorney, Agent, or FirmClarence A. OBrien; Harvey B. Jacobson [57] ABSTRACT A rotary scrubber of the type including a tubular frame member supported from the body of the scrubber and extending about and closely embracing a major portion of the lower periphery of the scrubbing member with the tubular frame member provided with underside air inlet openings and supported from the body of the rotary scrubber for floating gimbaled movement. The body of the rotary scrubber includes an upwardly projecting drive motor upon whose top or upper end a wet vacuum assembly is supported and the suction inlet for the wet vacuum is communicated with the interior of the tubular member in order that suds generated during a scrubbing action may be substantially immediately vacuumed from the surface of the article being scrubbed as the scrubber is orbited over that surface.

11 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures INTEGRATED FOAM EXTRACTING AND ROTARY SCRUBBING MACHINE The scrubbing machine of the instant invention comprises an improvement over the rotary scrubber disclosed in co-pending US. application Ser. No. 63,579, now US. Pat. No. 3,686,707, in that the integrated wet vacuum supported therefrom enables the operator of a machine to simultaneously shampoo and scrub a carpet while also vacuuming the suds generated as a result of the scrubbing operation without being encumbered by vacuum hoses leading from the scrubber to a separate wet vacuum unit. Accordingly, there is no need for the operator of the machine of the instant invention to step over or move about vacuum hoses leading to a separate wet vacuum machine nor is there a need for a second workman to move a separate wet vacuum along with the scrubbing machine as it is moved from one area of a carpet to another during the process of scrubbing the carpet.

Althouth there are presently being manufactured reasonably compact wet vacuums which may be utilized to vacuum the suds generated during a carpet scrubbing operation, because of the quantity of the nap of the carpet loosened during a scrubbing operation (approximately the same amount that is loosened during a conventional vacuuming operation by an upright vacuum cleaner), these compact wet vacuums tend to clog with those portions of the carpet nap picked up by the vacuum. Accordingly, most carpet cleaning establishments utilizing wet vacuums to vacuum the suds from the carpet when it is scrubbed utilize reasonably large wet vacuums with large filter areas. However, the mounting of a large wet vacuum atop a carpet scrubber renders the scrubber cumbersome to manage and thus the wet vacuum portion of the instant invention comprises a relatively compact wet vacuum which has been modified so as to be capable of handling relatively large quantities of carpet nap without clogging.

The main object of this invention is to provide a carpet scrubber with an integrated wet vacuum whereby a single workman may shampoo and scrub a carpet while simultaneously picking up the suds generated as a result of the scrubbing operation.

Another object of this invention is to provide a relatively compact wet vacuum with modifications thereto enabling it to handle relatively large quantities of carpet nap without becoming clogged.

A final object of this invention to be specifically enumerated herein is to provide an integrated foam extracting and rotary scrubbing machine in accordance with the preceding objects and which will conform to conventional forms of manufacture, be of simple construction and easy to use so as to provide a device that will be economically feasible, longlasting and relatively trouble-free in operation.

These together with other objects .and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which: v

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the integrated foam extracting and rotary scrubbing machine of the instant invention:

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional view taken substantially upon a plane passing through the collection canister of the wet vacuum portion of the invention;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary horizontal sectional view taken substantially upon a plane indicated by the section line 33 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view taken substantially upon a plane indicated by the section line 4-4 of FIG. 3; and

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view similar to FIG. 2 but illustrating a modified form of wet vacuum.

Referring now more specifically to the drawings the numeral 10 generally designates a conventional form of rotary scrubber including a body 12 from which an electric motor 14 is supported. The electric motor 14 includes a rotary output shaft (not shown) upon which a rotary brush 16 is mounted for rotation therewith. The brush 16 is of conventional design and is removably secured to the aforementioned motor output shaft whereby it may be readily removed and replaced by another brush, if desired.

The scrubber 10 is of substantially the same construction as the scrubber disclosed in the above referred to US. Pat. No. 3,686,707 in that it includes an upwardly and outwardly inclined handle 18 having a shampoo solution tank 20 supported therefrom including a gravity discharge line 22 provided .with a suitable control valve 24 actuatable by a control 26 adjacent to the upper end of the handle 18. Further, the rotary scrubber 10 is provided with a foam extractor attachment referred to in general by the reference numeral 28 supported from the body 12 for floating gimbaled movement, as disclosed in US. Pat. No. 3,686,707, the attachment 28 comprising a tubular member 30, also disclosed in US. Pat. No. 3,686,707 slotted along its underside and provided with opposite end upturned outlet ends 32 over which one pair of corresponding ends of a pair of transparent vacuum tubes 34 are telescoped.

Thus, the rotary scrubber 10, when the other pair of ends of the vacuum tubes 34 are communicated with a suitable source of vacuum, is operable in substantially the same manner.

However, rather than having to be utilized in conjunction with a separate wet vacuum and connected thereto by means ofa relatively long flexible vacuum line whereas the rotary scrubber 10 of the instant invention supports its own wet vacuum referred to in genera] by the reference numeral 38 on top of the motor 14.

The wet vacuum 38 includes an upwardly opening cylindrical housing 40 having a bottom wall 42. The upper marginal edge portion of the housing side wall 44 is rolled outwardly as at 46 to provide a reinforced bead about the top of the housing 40 and the vacuum 38 includes a closure cover referred to in general by the reference numeral 48.

In order to support the wet vacuum 38 from the top of the motor 14 a circular mounting plate 50 including an upturned peripheralretaining flange 52 is secured to the upper end of the motor 14 by means of suitable tubular spacers 54 and fasteners 56 secured through mounting plate 50, the tubular spacers 54 and the upper end of the motor 14.

A resilient pad 56 is placed over the upper surface of the mounting plate 50 within-the confines of the retaining flange 52 and is abutted by the lower end of the housing 40, the latter including circumferentially spaced overcenter toggle clamps 58 for releasably securing the housing 40 to the plate 50.

A vacuum unit referred to in general by the reference numeral 60 is provided and includes an electric motor 62 driving a blower (not shown). The blower includes an outlet 64 and an inlet cup 66. The vacuum unit 60 is secured through an opening 68 formed in a top wall 70 of the housing 40 with the motor 62 disposed above the top wall 70 and the inlet cup 66 disposed below the top wall 70, the motor 62 and cup 66 being secured to the upper and lower sides of the top wall 70 by means of fasteners 72.

The inlet cup 66 includes a central lower inlet opening 74 to which the upper end of the short leg 76 of a J-shaped inlet neck referred to in general by the reference numeral 78 is secured. The upstanding long leg 80 of the inlet neck 78 tapers upwardly toward an upwardly opening upper end 82 which is generally oval in cross-sectional shape, see FIG. 3.

A generally cylindrical separator partition referred to in general by the reference numeral 86 is provided and disposed within the housing 40 in upstanding position. The partition 86 includes a perforated lower section 88 which rests upon a bottom wall 42 and a cylindrical imperforate upper section 90 whose lower end is telescoped into and secured to the upper end of the lower section 88. The upper end of the upper section 90 is flared horizontally outwardly as at 92 in order to define upper end of the section 90. I

An annular seal 96 is carried by the underside of the abutment flange 94 while a second annular seal 98 is carried by the undersurfaceof the outer periphery of the top wall 70. Accordingly, with the wet vacuum 38 assembled as illustrated in FIG. 2 of the drawings, the seal 96 is disposed between the outwardly rolled upper lip of the housing 40 and the underside ofthe abutment flange 94 while the annular seal 98 is disposed. between the upper surface of the abutment flange 94 and the undersurface of the outer periphery of the top wall 70. The upper peripheral portion of the housing 40 includes peripherally spaced overcenter toggle assemblies 100 similar to the assemblies 58 and which are utilized to clampingly secure the top wall 70 to the upper end of the housing 40 in fluid type sealed engagement therewith. i

it will be noted that while the cylindrical partition 86 is substantially cylindrical, it includes a pair of circumferentially spaced upstanding and outwardly opening semicylindrical recesses 102. in addition, the outer surface of the upper section 90 of the partition 86 includes four circumferentially spaced spacing blocks 104 whereby when the partition 86 is disposed within the housing 40 it will be at least substantially concentric therewith.

From FIG. 2 of the drawings it may be seen that the tapered upper end 82 of the long leg 80 of the inlet neck 78 is snuggly received between the adjacent outer surface portion of the inlet cup 66 and the adjacent inner surface portion of the upper section 90 of the cylindrical partition 86. Further, it will be noted that a pair of vacuum air inlet fittings 106 are secured through the housing side wall 44 in registry with the rean abutment flange 94 extending peripherally about the cesses 102 and that the pair of ends of the vacuum tubes 34 remote from the tubular member 30 are telescoped over the outer ends of the fittings 106.

The upper end of the handle 18 not only includes controls for actuating the motor 14 but also a control 1 10 for actuating the motor 52 of the vacuum unit 60.

With attention invited more specifically to FIGS. 4 and 5 of the drawings, there may be seen a modified form of cylindrical partition 86' which is substantially identical to the partition 86 except that the lower section 88' thereof does not extend all the way down to the bottom wall 42 but instead terminates a spaced distance above the bottom wall 42 and includes a perforated bottom wall 89. Otherwise, the cylindrical portion 86' is identical to the cylindrical partition 86.

in operation, the rotary scrubber 10 is operative in substantially the same manner as the rotary scrubber disclosed in US. Pat. No. 3,686,707, except that the lightweight compact wet vacuum 38 associated with the rotary scrubber 10 is mounted atop the motor 14 of the scrubber in lieu of being detached from the latter and supported from the same surface over which the rotary scrubber is moving and connected to the latter by means of a long flexible vacuum tube.

As herein before set forth, rotary scrubbers utilized for shampooing carpets are usually accompanied by a separate relatively large capacity wet vacuum. To mount such a bulky vacuum atop the motor 14 would render the scrubber 10 excessively top heavy. Further, commercially available powerful but compact wet vacuums do not have sufficient fittering capacity for separating carpet nap from the air passing through the vacuum. Accordingly, heretofor it has been impossible to mount a compact butpowerful Wet vacuum atop the motor of a rotary scrubber.

The imperforate upper portions of the recesses 102 are disposed in registry with the outlet ends of the inlet fittings 106 and wet carpet nap picked up by the wet vacuum and being discharged into the housing 40 through the fittings 106 strikes the upper imperforate walls of the upper section and clings thereto so as to subsequently slide downwardly therealong. However, there is ample clearance between the adjacent outer surface portions of the upper section 90 and the inner ends of the fittings 106 to enable the free passage of vacuum air into the entire annular area between the housing side wall 44 and the outer surface of the lower section 88. Therefore, there is substantially no tendency of the perforated lower filter section 88 to become clogged with carpet nap.

Even should there be a large amount of carpet nap discharged into the housing 40 and impinged upon the surfaces of the upper section 90 defining the upper ends of the recesses 102, the accumulation of wet carpet nap will soon slide down the upper portions of the recesses I02 and into the lower portions of the recesses I02 defined by the lower section 88. While this will cause some of the apertures of perforations in the lower section 88 to become clogged, these apertures subject to clogging represent only a small fraction of the total number of apertures formed in the lower section 88 and therefore efficient operation of the wet vacuum 38 will not be impaired.

Inasmuch as the wet vacuum 38 is extremely compact and of low vertical height, the J-shaped inlet neck 78 is provided to further ensure that no water and wet carpet nap will be drawn into the inlet end 82 of the inlet neck 78. If the inlet neck 78 was not providedand air was drawn directly into theopening 74 formed in the bottom wall of the inlet cup 66, considerable quantities of water as well as wet carpet nap would be drawn into the opening 74. For this reason the .l-shaped inlet neck 78 is provided and in order to reduce the overall diameter of the wet vacuum 38 the diameter of the housing 40 and cylindrical partition 86 is maintained at a minimum with the upper inlet end 82 of the long leg 80 of the .I-shaped inlet neck 78 being flattened so as to be received within the narrow annular area defined between the inlet cup 66 and the opposing inner surface portions of the upper section 90 of the cylindrical partition 86. Accordingly, the total size and weight of the wet vacuum 38 has been maintained at a minimum without sacrificing the filtering ability thereof and the wet vacuum 38 may therefore operate at full efficiency and be mounted atop the motor 14 of the scrubber without rendering the scrubber 10 excessively top heavy. By mounting the vacuum atop the motor 14, an extremely compact carpet scrubbing and foam extracting machine is provided and the operator of the scrubber 10 need only operate the latter Without interference from a long flexible vacuum tube extending to a remote wet vacuum and the foam generated by the scrubbing action of the scrubber 10 may be immediately extracted from the carpet as the scrubber 10 is orbited back and forth across the carpet.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. A rotary scrubber including a body, horizontal, downwardly facing rotary scrubbing means underlying the body and journalled therefrom for rotation about a vertical axis extending generally centrally through said body, motor means supported from the upper side of said body and generally centered about said axis, said motor means projecting upwardly from said body and drivingly connected to said rotary scrubbing means, a handle supported from said body and including an elevated portion disposed outwardly of one marginal portion of said body, vacuum chamber means extending partially about the area beneath said body in which said rotary scrubbing means is disposed for extracting foam generated on a carpet, by the scrubbing means, a vertically compact wet vacuum unit supported atop said motor in generally centered position about said axis and including a vacuum air inlet and an air outlet, means communicating said vacuum air inlet with said vacuum chamber means, said wet vacuum unit including an upwardly opening housing secured atop said motor and including an upstanding continuous peripheral side wall, a removable top wall closing the upper end of said housing, an upstanding tubular partition disposed within said housing and including a wall spaced inwardly of the inner surface of said housing side wall, some portions of said partition wall being perforated and other portions of said partition wall being imperforate, said vacuum unit inlet being disposed within the confines of the upper portion of said tubular partition, said means communicating said vacuum air inlet with said vacuum chamber means comprising an air conduit opening into said vacuum chamber at one end and gen- .erally horizontally through an upper portion of said housing upstanding side wall into the area defined between said housing side wall and said tubular partition, at the other end thereof, an imperforate portion of said tubular partition being disposed in registry with said other end of said air conduit, whereby carpet nap or fragments entrained in air entering the last mentioned area from said other end of said conduit will impinge upon said imperforate portion of said partition, and will move downwardly therealong so as not to be drawn through the perforations of said partition.

2. The combination of claim 1 wherein the last mentioned imperforate wall portion defines an upstanding partial cylindrical recess opening outwardly toward said other end of said air conduit.

3. The combination of claim 2 wherein the lower end of said tubular partition is at least substantially closed by the bottom wall of said housing.

4. The combination of claim 2 wherein the lower end of said tubular partition rests upon the bottom wall of said housing.

5. The combination of claim 1 wherein said partition includes a perforated lower end wall.

6. The combination of claim 1 wherein said vacuum air inlet is generally essentially disposed within the confines of said tubular partition a spaced distance below the upper end of said tubular partition, and a J-shaped inlet neck for said vacuum air inlet extending downwardly from the latter, outwardly toward one peripheral portion of said tubular partition and then upwardly along the inner surface of said peripheral portion of said body, an elongated generally horizontal tubular said tubular partition to a point spaced slightly below the top wall of said housing.

7. in combination, a rotary scrubber including a gen erally horizontal body having opposite side and front and rear marginal portions, a single, horizontal, downwardly facing rotary scrubbing means underlying said body and journalled therefrom for rotation about a generally centrally disposed vertical axis, motor means supported from the upper side of said body and generally centered coaxially with said axis, said motor means projecting upwardly from said body and drivingly connected to said rotary scrubbing means, a handle supported from said body and including an elevated portion disposed outwardly over one marginal portion of member closely embracing and extending at least partially about the horizontal area in which said scrubbing means is disposed, said tubular member and said body including coacting means supporting said tubular member from said body for limited vertical shifting and free inclination in any direction relative to said axis, said coacting means also including means operative to yield ingly urge said tubular member toward a lower limit position relative to said body, a vertically compact wet vacuum unit supported atop said motor in generally centered position about said axis, said vacuum unit including an upwardly opening tubular housing provided with a removal top wall, a motorized vacuum blower assembly secured through a central portion of said top wall, and including a centrally disposed first vacuum air inlet spaced below said top wall, and a vacuum air outlet, a tubular partition mounted within said housing defining an annular inlet chamber between the inner surface of said housing and the outer surface of said tubul ar partition, said tubular partition being sealed relative to said top wall, said housing including a second vacuum air inlet opening generally horizontally through the side wall of said housing into said annular chamber, and vacuum air conduit means communicating said second vacuum air inlet with the interior of said tubular member, the lower surface of said tubular member having at least one inlet opening formed therethrough.

8 The combination of claim 7 wherein at least some lower portions of said tubular partition have apertures formed therethrough, the portion of said partition registered with said second vacuum air inlet being imperforate.

9. The combination of claim 8 wherein said portion of said tubular partition registered with said second vacuum'air inlet define an upstanding outwardly opening semi-cylindrical recess.

10. The combination of claim 9 wherein said housing includes a further vacuum air inlet spaced circumferentially about said housing from said second vacuum air inlet said tubular partition including a pair of imperforate portions thereof defining upstanding outwardly opening partial cylindrical recesses registered with said housing second and further vacuum air inlets.

11. The combination of claim 10 wherein said housing second and further vacuum air inlets are disposed on one side of said'housing and the blower assembly vacuum air inlet opens upwardly into the interior of said tubular partition adjacent to the top wall of said housing and the side of said tubular partition remote from the side of said housing through which said housing second and further vacuum air inlets open.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2149453 *Oct 8, 1936Mar 7, 1939Reconstruction Finance CorpVacuum scrubber
US3686707 *Aug 13, 1970Aug 29, 1972Chem Specialties Mfg CorpFoam extractor for rotary scrubber
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4133072 *Mar 1, 1977Jan 9, 1979Face Jr Samuel ADevice for removing water from large floor surfaces
US5522114 *Apr 3, 1995Jun 4, 1996Allison; Robert M.Carpet cleaning apparatus
US5706549 *Jun 25, 1996Jan 13, 1998Advance Machine CompanyRotary disc floor cleaning apparatus
US5761763 *Mar 11, 1996Jun 9, 1998The Hoover CompanyUpright carpet extractor
US6073300 *Jan 8, 1999Jun 13, 2000Royal Appliance Mfg. Co.Valve assembly for carpet extractor
US6138322 *Feb 24, 1997Oct 31, 2000The Hoover CompanyUpright carpet and upholstery extractor
US6145159 *Jan 8, 1999Nov 14, 2000Royal Appliance Mfg. Co.Combination dirty fluid tank and nozzle for a carpet extractor
US6325864Aug 7, 2000Dec 4, 2001Royal Appliance Mfg. Co.Combination dirty fluid tank and nozzle for a carpet extractor
US6792648 *Mar 26, 2001Sep 21, 2004Samsung Kwangju Electronics Co., Ltd.Floor cloth for use in vacuum cleaner and apparatus of vacuum cleaner for rotatably driving the floor cloth
US7767030Sep 24, 2008Aug 3, 2010Chemical Specialties Manufacturing Corp.Cleaning device
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/353, 15/385
International ClassificationA47L11/29, A47L11/30
Cooperative ClassificationA47L11/4044, A47L11/4016, A47L11/30
European ClassificationA47L11/40F6, A47L11/40D2, A47L11/30