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Publication numberUS3797181 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 19, 1974
Filing dateOct 10, 1966
Priority dateOct 10, 1966
Publication numberUS 3797181 A, US 3797181A, US-A-3797181, US3797181 A, US3797181A
InventorsNievelt F
Original AssigneeZelda Nievelt
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Roof vent pipe shield
US 3797181 A
Abstract
A shield for protecting a roof vent pipe has an outer cylindrical sheath extending downwardly for a substantial distance with a substantially uniform outer diameter and terminating at the bottom in a flaring portion adapted to contact with the sealing base of the vent pipe. The upper end is inturned to form an inner cylinder extending downwardly for a distance substantially greater than the outer diameter of the outer cylinder. The vent pipe is thereby enclosed between the outer and inner portions of the shield. The shield is preferably molded from a non-metallic material such as polypropylene plastic.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Nievelt [111 3,797,181 [451 Mar. 19, 1974 Related US. Application Data Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 490.382, Sept. 27, 1965, abandoned.

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3/1930 Blanchard 52/244 X 9/1940 Prince 4/1897 Weeden 52/58 X 1.202.687 10/1916 Elkerton i. 285/43 X 1,923,220 8/1933 Lightbown 3,163,101 12/1964 Caparrelli 285/44 X Primary ExaminerPrice C. Faw, Jr. Attg n y, gjgent, or Firr'nWhittemore, Hulbert & Belknap [5 7] ABSTRACT A shield for protecting a roof vent pipe has an outer cylindrical sheath extending downwardly for a substantial distance with a substantially uniform outer diameter and terminating at the bottom in a flaring portion adapted to contact with the sealing base of the vent pipe. The upper end is inturned to form an inner cylinder extending downwardly for a distance substantially greater than the outer diameter of the outer cylinder. The vent pipe is thereby enclosed between the outer and inner portions of the shield. The shield is preferably molded from a non-metallic material such as polypropylene plastic.

10 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PATENTEU NARIQ l974 INVENTOR FRANK J. NIEVELT ATTORNEYS ROOF VENT PIPE SHIELD This application is a continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 490,382 filed Sept. 27, 1965 now abandoned.

The invention relates to a new and improved roof vent pipe shield.

Under the building and plumbing codes of various cities it is always required that for each plumbing fixture trap, a vent pipe be connected thereto which extends through the roof. The structures which are commercially available to builders for complying with the codes have been standardized to a considerable extent but in general they consist of a sheet metal base secured to the roof in a manner which is considered leakproof. There is an upstanding collar on the base of a sufficiently large inner diameter to permit the vent pipe to extend upwardly therethrough for whatever is prescribed by the code. The usual practice is to provide caulking between the collar and the vent pipe to make it leakproof. However, it is quite well known that these standard constructions, while usually leakproof when first installed, often later develop flaws which result in leakage of rain water. There have been many proposals for suppyling a shield for theyent pipe and the constructions heretofore available have met with various degrees of success. The present invention'is an improvement in shields for roof vent pipes.

In the drawing:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view showing a standard construction of roof vent pipe with the improved shield in position to be applied thereto.

FIG. 2 is a vertical section through the vent pipe and shield.

FIG. 3 is a cross section on the line 3-3 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a cross section on the line 4--4 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 5 is an elevation showing the lower portion of the vent pipe shield.

FIG. 6 is a longitudinal section through a modified construction of shield.

As shown in FIG. 1, the numeral 10 shows, in perspective, theexterior of the shield of the invention in position to be inserted over a roof vent pipe 11 which extends upwardly from the roof 12. The vent pipe 11 is normally manufactured in standard sizes designated by the inside diameter thereof, the usual standards being designated as 3-inch and 4-inch. It is of course necessary that the shield of the present invention be constructed of a size to fit the particular size of standard vent pipe. In accordance with standard practice the vent pipe projects through the collar 13 of the sheet metal base 14 which in turn is mounted beneath the shingles 15 of the roof in such a manner as to insure a leakproof construction. The inner diameter 16 of the collar 13 is sufficiently larger in diameter than the outside of the pipe 1 1 so as to permit substantial variations in tolerances in the mounting of the base in the roof. Between the vent pipe and the inside diameter of the collar it is conventional to provide caulking 17. The base 14 has a flat rectangular portion which contacts with the roof. Within the margins of the rectangular base there is a connecting dome-shaped portion 34 which curves upwardly until it intersects with the collar 13 thereby providing a curved convex surface 18. The dome has a somewhat different curvature in the front portion 19 below the collar, than it has in the rear portion 20, and the two opposite side portions 21. The

construction as thus far described is standard practice in the art and the present invention relates to a shield which is adapted to be used in connection with said standard roof vent pipe construction.

The shield 10 is preferably made of a nonmetallic material which can be readily molded into the ultimate configuration. The outside of the shield has a cylindrical portion 22 extending for the greater part of the total length with a flaring skirt portion 23 at the base. The inner cylinder 24 extends downwardly from the top end 25 for a distance substantially greater than the outer diameter of the outer cylinder 22 and the lower end 26 is at a distance substantially above the line 27 forming the intersection between the flare 23 and the outer cylinder 22. The annular space between the inner and outer tubes of the shield is sufficient to receive the standard vent pipe 11 with which the shield is designed to cooperate. The plastic parts 29 which are shown in FIG. 4 as being spaced circumferentially on the inside of the flaring portion of the shield are included for facilitating the manufacture of the device. These parts 29 are used during the molding process as abutments facilitating the ejection of the molded article from the die.

As shown in FIG. 5, the lower end of the shield is arranged at an angle with the longitudinal axis and the edge 30 has an angle corresponding to a standard pitch of a roof. In order that the shield may be adapted for roofs of different pitches a series of score lines are formed on the outer surface of the skirt 23, these lines being designated by the numerals 31., 32 and 33 respectively. The angle of the base shown at 30 is that which most nearly accords with the pitch of a modern roof. The line 31 corresponds to a roof angle of 20 to 29. The line 32 corresponds to a pitch angle between 30 and 40, while the line 33 corresponds to an angle which would be considered a steep roof.

It will be observed that when the shield is placed over the vent pipe the lower edge 30 of the skirt portion of the shield is designed to contact with the curved connecting portion 34 of the sheet metal base 14. Since the curved connecting portion 34 of the sheet metal base is somewhat irregular in curvature the fit of the shield is obtained by reason of the flexibility of the skirt. This is obtained because of the nature of the material used for the shield and because the walls of the skirt portion are thin enough to permit flexing so that the skirt will conform precisely with whatever irregularities there may be in the curved portion 34 of the base.

Although the invention is not necessarily limited to any specific material, the shield of this invention is preferably manufactured from a plastic material which lends itself to injection molding. A suitable material is a polypropylene plastic such as a polypropylene copolymer. This material forms an all weather crackproof semi-flexible structure which can be readily trimmed if necessary to fit roofs of various pitches. Desirably the polypropylene plastic contains a material for imparting a gold coloration.

Although the invention is not limited to particular sizes and dimensions it should be noted that a 3-inch roof vent pipe is normally provided with a sheet metal basein which the fiat portion has a width of about 1 1 inches and a length of about 12 inches. The inside diameter of the collar 13 is about 3% inches, while the collar extends upwardly above the flat portion for about 2% inches at the vertical axis. The distance from the front intersection line 35 to the collar is about 3 inches, while the distance from the collar to the sides and upper line of intersection is about 1 inch. The above figures represent a standard type of sheet metal base for a 3-inch vent pipe. When larger sizes of vent pipes are used the dimensions of the base are somewhat larger.

The shield of the present invention when manufactured to fit a standard 3-inch vent pipe structure is desirably about 14 inches in length and the cylindrical portion is 3% inches in outer diameter and2 /2 inches in inner diameter. The wall thickness throughout is approximately 1/16 inch and the upper edge 25 is /1 inch in thickness.

As previously stated, the inner cylinder 24 extends downwardly from the top end 25 for a distance substantially greater than the outer diameter of the outer cylinder 22. This is clearly illustrated in FIG. 2.

The shield as herein above described can be used with vent pipes which extend beyond the flashing and the collar for a distance from 2 inches to 13 inches. The shield of this invention when used with a vent pipe larger than 3 inches is made correspondingly larger. The vent pipe shield of the present invention has many advantages over the constructions which have heretofore been used to protect vent pipes. Amongst the advantages are the following: This device can be manufactured at low cost by mass production methods. The material is flexible to fit irregular vent pipes. The inside sleeve 24 readily slides within the vent pipe while the outside portion extends down onto the metal flashing and protects against rusting of said metal flashing. The present construction is easy to install and because of the coloring incorporated in the plastic, it beautifies the roof and does not need periodic painting although the material is adapted to receive paint if so desired. Because of the nature of the material the shield forms a lightning insulator, and the entire object is rustproof and resistant to all weather conditions. It protects the vent pipe construction from leakage and always prevents rain water from entering into any defect in the caulking or other weather seals inherent in standard vent pipe construction.

The gold coloration is obtained by incorporating gold flakes into the polypropylene plastic and this material deflects ultra violet rays. It should be particularly noted that the manufacture of the device of a material and of a size to produce ready flexibility causes the shield to fit regularly on vent pipe constructions which are irregular on the exterior and are out of round or eccentric because of different wall thicknesses. As hereinbefore mentioned the flaring portion of the shield has lines scored thereon at different angles to facilitate trimming the lower edge to an angle corresponding with the roof angle. The trimming can readily be effected with a knife.

In FIG. 6 there is shown a modified construction which is particularly useful in states where the code requires a very long vent pipe. Therefore in this modification the shield is constructed of two separate parts, an upper part 10a and a lower part 10b. The lower part is of identical construction with that shown in FIG. 2 except that the outer cylindrical portion 22 extends upwardly from the flaring skirt portion 23 for a short distance only and terminates in an edge 22b. The upper part 10a has its outer cylindrical portion 220 of slightly larger diameter than the lower cylinder 22 terminating in a lower edge 22c. The upper part 10a telescopically engages the lower part 10b as illustrated. This construction is adapted to fit various lengths of vent pipe by the sliding fit of the two parts. In this modification the upper part 10a is provided with the inner cylinder 24 integrally connected by the top end 25.

What I claim as my invention is:

1. A shield for protecting a roof vent pipe comprising an outer cylindrical sheath having its upper end inturned to form an integral inner cylinder, said inner cylinder extending lengthwise of said outer sheath and spaced therefrom to provide an annular space for receiving a roof vent pipe, said outer sheath extending for a substantial lengthwise distance downwardly from said upper end with substantially uniform outer diameter and substantially uniform thin wall thickness, said inner cylinder extending downwardly from said upper end for a distance substantially greater than said outer diameter of said outer cylinder, said inner cylindrical sheath also having substantially uniform thin wall thickness and substantially uniform inner diameter, a flaring portion extending downwardly from and integral with said sheath, said flaring portion being annular in cross section with sides which are straight in longitudinal section extending at a constant angle for the entire flaring length, said flaring portion terminating in a lower edge lying in a plane extending at an angle with the longitudinal axis corresponding to the angle of roof with which said vent pipe is associated.

2. A shield for protecting a roof vent pipe according to claim 1 in which said roof vent pipe projects through a metal base having a flat portion engaging a roof, a collar surrounding said pipe, and a dome-shaped connection between said flat portion and said collar, said lower edge of the flaring portion of said shield being flexible and snugly engaging said dome in a line contact above the flat portion of said base.

3. A shield according to claim 2 in which said flaring portion is provided with a series of circumferential lines respectively lying in a series of different planes at different angles with respect to the longitudinal axis of said shield thereby providing indicia for trimming said flaring portion to obtain a lower edge of desired angularity to fit a predetermined roof.

4. A shield for protecting a roof vent pipe according to claim 2 in which the entire structure is composed of a molded polypropylene plastic thereby providing a rust-free lightning insulator, said plastic having incorporated therein gold flakes, in which said flaring portion is provided with a series of circumferential lines respectively lying in a series of different planes at different angles with respect to the longitudinal axis of said shield thereby providing indicia for trimming said flaring portion to obtain a lower edge of desired angularity to fit a predetermined roof.

5. A shield according to claim 1 in which the entire structure is composed of a molded polypropylene plastic thereby providing a rust-free lightning insulator.

6. A shield according to claim 1 in which said entire structure is composed of a molded polypropylene plastic.

7. A shield for protecting a roof vent pipe according to claim 6 in which said roof vent pipe projects through a metal base having a flat portion engaging a roof, a collar surrounding said pipe, and a dome-shaped connection between said flat portion and said collar, said lower edge of the flaring portion and said shield being flexible and snugly engaging said dome in a line contact above the flat portion of said base and in which said flaring portion is provided with a series of circumferential lines respectively lying in a series of different planes at different angles with respect to the longitudinal axis of said shield thereby providing indicia for trimming said flaring portion to obtain a lower edge of desired angularity to correspond with the pitch of a predetermined roof. v

8. A shield according to claim 1 in which said flaring portion is provided with a series of circumferential lines respectively lying in a series of differentplanes at different angles with respect to the longitudinal axis of said shield thereby providing indicia for trimming said flaring portion to obtain a lower edge of desired angularity to fit a predetermined roof.

9. A shield according to claim 1 in which the intersection of said sheath with the depending flaring portion is provided on the interior surface thereof with a series of protuberances forming abutments to facilitate integral with said inner cylinder.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US580515 *Jul 28, 1896Apr 13, 1897 Roof-flange
US1202687 *Nov 24, 1913Oct 24, 1916George H ElkertonVent-pipe flashing.
US1751026 *Jul 2, 1929Mar 18, 1930Henri CrepeauChimney
US1923220 *Jun 8, 1932Aug 22, 1933Lightbown Edward NVent pipe joint guard
US2215251 *Feb 7, 1938Sep 17, 1940R C HallEnd protector for threadless pipe
US3163101 *Mar 26, 1963Dec 29, 1964Caparrelli Anthony AVent flashing cap
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3977137 *Jun 30, 1975Aug 31, 1976Johns-Manville CorporationRoof vent support arrangement
US4010578 *Nov 11, 1974Mar 8, 1977Logsdon Duane DRoof flashing structure
US4115961 *Jul 28, 1977Sep 26, 1978West County Supply & Mfg. Co., Inc.Vent cover
US4120129 *Sep 1, 1976Oct 17, 1978The Pate CompanyPipe flashing unit
US4484424 *Aug 17, 1982Nov 27, 1984Logsdon Duane DRoof vent
US4593504 *Feb 14, 1985Jun 10, 1986Jimco ProductsPressure equalizing roof vent
US4890427 *Jun 29, 1984Jan 2, 1990Rayburn Lee WMobile home roof apparatus
US4897974 *Jan 4, 1989Feb 6, 1990Lane Byron DVent pipe roof mount
US5245804 *Aug 11, 1992Sep 21, 1993Mid-America Building Products CorporationVent pipe shield
US5493820 *Jul 6, 1993Feb 27, 1996Joseph; Michael A.Fire preventing duct system
US5536048 *Nov 28, 1994Jul 16, 1996Orr; Mark G.For diverting rain away from a cone flashing of a furnace
US5694724 *Feb 16, 1996Dec 9, 1997Santiago; JacintoVent pipe cover
US5778611 *Dec 20, 1996Jul 14, 1998Michel; DanielVent extension flashing assembly
US6185885 *Jan 8, 1999Feb 13, 2001Ken ThalerRoof flashing assembly
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US7143557 *Dec 23, 2002Dec 5, 2006Ayers Jr W HowardStructural vent assembly for a roof perimeter
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US7735267Aug 1, 2007Jun 15, 2010Ayers Jr W HowardStructural vented roof deck enclosure system
US7775005 *Oct 24, 2007Aug 17, 2010Johnston Lorne GVent pipe covering system
US7882670Jul 23, 2008Feb 8, 2011West G LeonardRoof vent base plate and installation methods
US8024894May 12, 2010Sep 27, 2011Ayers Jr W HowardStructural vented roof deck enclosure system
US8272186Mar 15, 2010Sep 25, 2012Mark Stephen ManningRoof vent pipe shield
US8397438 *Oct 12, 2006Mar 19, 2013Heartland Metals, Inc.Flashing boots for roof penetrations
US8413687Mar 23, 2011Apr 9, 2013David W. WoodringInsulated sewer vent cover
US8453389 *Aug 4, 2011Jun 4, 2013Bruce A. SelkeRoof boot
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US20120031024 *Aug 4, 2011Feb 9, 2012Selke Bruce ARoof boot
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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/105, 285/43, 52/219, 52/199
International ClassificationE04D13/14, E04D13/147, E04F17/04, E04F17/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04D13/1476, E04F17/04
European ClassificationE04D13/147D2, E04F17/04