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Publication numberUS3798054 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 19, 1974
Filing dateSep 24, 1971
Priority dateSep 25, 1970
Also published asCA968708A, CA968708A1, DE2146859A1, DE2146859B2, DE2146859C3
Publication numberUS 3798054 A, US 3798054A, US-A-3798054, US3798054 A, US3798054A
InventorsT Ohmura, K Yano, H Sugiura, N Takada, R Kawata, H Kawada
Original AssigneeH Kawada, R Kawata, N Takada, H Sugiura, K Yano, T Ohmura
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of sugar coating tablets
US 3798054 A
Abstract
A sugar-coated tablet characterized by high stability is prepared by a simple and commercially feasible procedure. The tablet is prepared by applying to the tablet core an aqueous sugar solution containing calcium lactate.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Kawata et a1.

[451 Mar. 19, 1974 METHOD OF SUGAR COATWG TABLETS [76] Inventors: Ryuichi Kawata, 16-12, Sendagi 3-chome, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo; Hiroitsu Kawada, 30-29-22, Hasune Z-chome, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo; Tadayoshi Ohmura, 11-12, Honcho l-chome, Kurumcmachi, Kitatamagun, Tokyo; Katsuhiko Yano, 16-1 Hasune 3-chome, ltabashi-ku, Tokyo; l-liroshi Sugiura, 16-1 Hasune 3-chome, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo; Nobuo Takada, 16-1 Hasune 3-chome, ltabushi-ku, Tokyo, all of Japan [22] Filed: Sept. 24, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 183,635

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Sept. 25, 1970 Japan 45-83917 [52] US. Cl 117/100 A, 117/165, 424/35 [51] Int. Cl B32b 1/00 [58] Field of Search 117/165, 100 A; 99/141; 424/35 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,384,493 5/1968 Ferrel 1 99/83 1,829,947 ll/l93l Schneller... 99/141 R 2,693,437 ll/l954 Spradling.... 424/35 2,693,436 1l/l954 Spradling 424/35 OTHER PUBLICATIONS Chem. Abstracts Vol. 58 C01. 4717A (1960).

Primary Examiner-Murray Katz Assistant Examiner-Dennis C. Konopacki [57] ABSTRACT A sugar-coated tablet characterized by high stability is prepared by a simple and commercially feasible procedure. The tablet is prepared by applying to the tablet core an aqueous sugar solution containing calcium lactate.

4 Claims, No Drawings METHOD OF SUGAR COATING TLETS DETAILED EXPLANATION OF THE INVENTION:

The present invention relates to a method of coating tablets, or the like, by applying thereto a sugar coating composition comprising an aqueous sugar solution containing calcium lactate.

Sugar-coated tablets are widely used owing to the remarkable excellency in taste, odor and appearance as compared with tablet cores and such tablets have the effect of preventing medicaments, and the like, which are present in the tablets from being decomposed by air or moisture. On the other hand, such tablets are characterized by the following shortcomings:

a. Because the various steps such as sealing, subcoating, rounding, smoothing, coloring, finishing etc., for preparing the sugar-coated tablets must be performed generally, manually, such an involved procedure requires an extended period of time, i.e., about 1 week to produce such sugar-coated tablets. Further, it is extremely difficult to produce such tablets automatically.

b. In order to obtain sugar-coated tablets of high strength, it is necessary to form a coating layer having sufficient thickness so that its weight is almost equal to that of the tablet core and in order to form such a coating layer, the number of the coating operations must be increased thereby prolonging the time required to produce the coating. Furthermore, by using such a procedure, it is difficult to obtain sugar-coated tablets characterized by uniform weight.

c. Conventional sugar-coated tablets are not readily disintegrated in digestive organs and in particular, the disintegration time increases with the passage of time.

d. The sugar-coated tablets tend to crack during storage.

e. The color of the sugar-coated tablets tends to fade by exposure to temperature, humidity, light, etc. and

f. Sugar-coated tablets are subject to damage by impact.

Various attempts have been made to overcome the aforesaid difficulties and objectionable features characterizing sugar-coated tablets obtained by prior art procedures. For example, one method has been described for adding calcium sulfate in a sub-coating procedure and this is described in Japanese Patent Publication No. 17,537/1964. Another method involves adding fine crystals of cellulose to a sucrose-containing aqueous solution and this is described in Japanese Patent Publication No. 26,918/1965. However, while these methods did increase the strength of the sugarcoated tablets and prevented the formation of cracks to some extent, the disintegration time of the resulting tablets was unduly prolonged.

Moreover, there is also known a high-speed sugar coating method in which the period of time required for coating is reduced and this procedure involves the use of a mono-liquid type coating composition prepared by adding a high molecular weight compound such as polyethylene glycol to a sucrose solution. This method is described in US. Pat. No. 3,331,696 but this procedure is also objectionable in that the appearance of the resulting tablet is objectionable and also the tablets prepared by this method are subject to cracks and are easily damaged.

There is a known method for avoiding the production, manually, of sugar-coated tablets, thereby overcoming the objection set forth in paragraph (a) supra, formed by spraying onto tablet cores, a coating composition of a single component at pressure of 800 1,500 pounds per square inch thereby avoiding a pretreatment which calls for specific skill and manual handling (see, e.g., US. Pat. No. 3,361,631). This method may achieve the purpose of saving labor but is still objectionable in that the sugar-coated tablets prepared by this method are not sufficient in strength and therefore are liable to be damaged. Furthermore, when the medicaments or other active materials, and the like, present in the tablets are sensitive to moisture, such a method cannot overcome the problems that are encountered when the sugar-coated tablets are stored for a long period of time under a high-humidity condition as the medicaments or other active material, and the like, which are present in the tablets are liable to transude (resulting in the loss of its commercial value) and also, the tablets are liable to decompose.

Other methods are known to produce sugar-coated tablets but they are also undesirable because while some of the objectionable features referred to above may be eliminated, other objectionable features must still be dealt with.

The main point of this invention is to make it possible to substantially reduce the production time and thereby reduce labor costs involved in the production of sugarcoated tablets by using a coating solution having a single component without forming sugar coatings involving the successive use of several kinds of coating solutions, each of such solutions having a different composition.

Another object of this invention is to provide sugarcoated tablets characterized by l an acceptable disintegration time, (2) freedom from cracks, and substantially stable on prolonged storage that is, resistant to surrounding or environment conditions such as temperature, moisture, and light, the aforesaid characteristics being far superior to conventional sugar-coated tablets.

A further object of this invention is to make it possible to apply directly, a sugar coating composition, to tablet cores, without requiring such pre-treatments as sealing, and the like, to the tablet cores, prior to the application of sugar coating to the tablet cores.

Following considerable investigation, it has been discovered, quite surprisingly and unexpectedly, that when a coating solution containing sugar and calcium lactate is used for the preparation of sugar-coated tablets, not only is the objectionable feature described in paragraph (a) supra, is avoided but also the objectionable features described in paragraphs (b) (f) supra, are also obviated.

The present invention is based on the novel and highly surprising and unexpected discovery that when a sugar syrup containing calcium lactate is allowed to stand, fine crystals of sugar are precipitated and the whole syrup is uniformly solidified.

It is known that when calcium lactate is added to an aqueous sugar solution, the viscosity of the solution increases or the solution becomes jelly-like (see, Kirk- Othmer, Encyclopedia of Chem. Tech.; 12, 2nd Ed., edited by A. Standen et al., lnterscience Publishers lnc., NY. (1967), page l83; Chemical Abstracts; 58, 4714a 1963). However, it has never been known until the present discovery, that when calcium lactate is added to a concentrated aqueous sugar solution (sugar syrup), the syrup is solidified. In addition, the uniformly solidified product obtained in this case is different from the solidified material obtained by drying or heating a sucrose syrup containing no calcium lactate in that the particles of sugar in the former case are very fine.

The present invention has many merits and among them some remarkable advantages as will be described hereinafter.

The sugar-coated tablets prepared according to the method of this invention are superior in impact resistance and humidity resistance to present sugar-coated tablets. Also, the disintegration rate of the sugar-coated tablet immediately after the production thereof is remarkably faster than those produced by conventional procedures and even when the sugar-coated tablets which are obtained by the process of this invention are stored under severe or unusual conditions, the disintegration time is substantially unaffected as said disintegration time is comparable to that noted with respect to sugar-coated tablets tested shortly after they were produced.

Following the new and improved method of this invention, the coating step is conducted by using a single coating composition and it is unnecessary to utilize the conventional manual steps described supra as the composition and the amount of each coating solution is in order to effect each of the conventional manual steps including the undercoating and intermediate coating operations such as sealing, subcoating, rounding and smoothing and the coloring operation. Accordingly, by the method of this invention, the coating operation is simplified and the coating operation is completely automatized at a high speed. Moreover, by the method of this invention, the thickness of the sugar coating layer is sufficient even if it is only about one-half of the thickness of the tablet obtained by conventional procedures is reduced as well as the period of time necessary for forming the sugar coating which is usually shorter than 12 hours. Still further, the sugar-coated tablets obtained show less deviation in weight that is, they are of more uniform weight and are uniform in size. Further, the rate of rejection or percent rejection of the sugarcoated tablets at heat sealing package is low, making the present process most suitable and desirable for commercial production. In addition, calcium lactate is a compound which is acceptable as an additive for foods and provides no physiological difficulties.

Comparative experiments of the sugar-coated tablets prepared by the method of this invention with composite vitamin-containing tablets having sugar coatings formed by the steps of undercoating, intermediate coating and finishing coating using a convention procedure are set out below.

4 TABLE 1;

When the tablets were rotated in a friability tester at 3,600 rotations, the number of damaged tablets per tablets are shown in the following table, by percent:

lD amaged percent Tablets Obtaincd by the process of the invention 0 Control tablets TABLE 2:

The amount of loss of surface luster of tablets when they are stored at 37C and at a relative humidity of 83 percent:

Faded state of tablets when, after applying sugar coating using tartrazine, they were preserved at 37 C and at a relative humidity of 83 percent 15 day 30 day storage storage Tablets obtained by the scarcely slightly process of the invention changed faded Control tablets almost half almost all were faded were faded TABLE 4:

Faded state of tablets when, after applying sugar coating using a mixture of tartrazine and new coccine as coloring agent, they were allowed to stand outdoors.

l5 day 30 day storage storage Tablets obtained by the scarcely slightly process of the invention changed faded Control tablets almost half almost all were faded were faded TABLE 5:

Period of time required for disintegration by the disintegration test of U.S.P. Xll after preserving the tablets for 30 days under various temperature and humidity. conditions.

Preservation condition Directly at C at 56C 40C & After 74% rela- Production tive humidity Tablets Obtained by the process of the invention 4'28" 4'38" 6'56" 4'54" Control tablets l2'06" 2l I 20' (Note): The period of time requiredd or the disinte gration of tablet cores before sugar coating was 2'20".

TABLE 6:

Deviation degree (mg.) of the weight of 100 sugarcoated tablets produced.

The tablet cores or similar materials to be applied with sugar coating by the method of this invention may be produced in any desired size and shape such as in disc form, doughnut form, spindle form, granular form, etc.

In the practice of the method of this invention, sugars such as sucrose, mannitol, sorbitol, etc. may be used and an aqueous solution of sucrose of about'40 to 70 percent is usually used. The amount of calcium lactate added to the aqueous sucrose solution is less than about 40 percent. In particular, favorable results can be obtained when a coating solution prepared by adding about 3 to 20 percent calcium lactate to about a 60 to 70 percent aqueous sucrose solution is used. Also, if necessary, a tasting agent, a flavoring agent, a colorant, an opaquing agent, a thickening agent, etc., may be desirably added to the coating solution. For applying the coating solution to tablet cores, the coating solution heated ordinarily to about 60C was sprayed onto the tablet cores in a coating pan in rotation so that the coating solution was uniformly applied and the tablet cores were dried by applying warm blasts of air while rotating the coating pan. In the present procedure, a so-called pausing operation of rotating a coating pan without applying a warm blast of air after applying a coating solution over the tablet cores, which is always employed in a conventional sugar coating step, is unnecessary.

EXAMPLE 1 Sucrose 630g Calcium lactate lOOg Distilled Water 270g Tartrazine lg cor es bya warm blast, about 30g of the coating solution prepared above was applied onto the tablet cores while rotating the coating pan and after uniformly coating the tablet cores with the coating solution, the coating pan was further rotated while sending a warm blast of about 60C. By repeating the same procedure, sugar-coated tablets, each having a weight of 200mgs, were obtained over a period of about 3 hours.

EXAMPLE 2:

Sucrose 620g Calcium lactate 40g Gelatin 5g Tartrazine lg New Coccine l g Distilled Water 305g Distilled water was heated to a temperature of higher than C and while stirring the water, gelatin, sucrose, calcium lactate, tartarzine, and New Coccine were successively added to the distilled water to provide a homogeneous coating solution.

Following the same procedure as in Example 1 and using the coating solution thus prepared, sugar-coated tablets, each having a weight of 230 mgs, were obtained (U: Particlc sizc l-S microns.

Distilled water was heated to a temperature of higher than 80C and while stirring, gelatin, sucrose, calcium lactate, and tartrazine were successively added to the distilled water. Thereafter, the fine particles of polytetrafluoroethylene and talc were uniformly dispersed in the aqueous solution to provide a coating composition. 0 Following the same procedure as in Example 1 and using the coating composition, sugar-coated tablets, each having a weight of 260mgs were obtained, over a period of about 10 hours.

EXAMPLE 4 W Sucrose 58 lg Sucrose distearate* 20g Calcium lactate g Talc 50g Tartrazine 2g Distilled water 250g I (")c Nitto Ester 5-770 (trade name. made by Dai Nippon Scito K,K.)

Distilled water was heated to a temperature of higher than 80C and while stirring the distilled water, sucrose, sucrose distearate, calcium lactate, and tartrato percent sugar and 3 to 20% calcium lactate.

2. A tablet according to claim 1 wherein the coating contains about 60 to 70 percent sugar.

3. A tablet according to claim 1 wherein the sugar is sucrose.

4, A tablet according to claim 1 wherein sugar coating syrup colorants, opaquing agents, flavoring agents, thickening agents and mixtures thereof are added.

4 omits Cam 1" F meow Patent No. '3, 798, 054- Dsted March 19 1974 gnventofls) svRyuiohi Kawata, et a1 It is certified that error appears in the above-identifies patent and that said Letters Patent see hereby correcse as shown below The name of the Assignee Company has been omitted. from the first page of the Patent and should read as follows:

'-- Assignee: Yamanouehi Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd.

Signed and sealed this 11th day of February 1975.

(SEAL) Attest:

' C. SHALL DANN RUTH C. MASON Commissioner of Patents Attesting Officer and Trademarks DRM PC4050 (10-69) USCOMM-DC 60376-969 u s eovumuzm alumna OIIICI nu o-us-su

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Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *Chem. Abstracts Vol. 58 Col. 4717A (1960).
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4258179 *Dec 20, 1978Mar 24, 1981Yamanouchi Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.Coating agents for solid medicaments
US4459280 *Jul 23, 1982Jul 10, 1984G. D. Searle & Co.Psyllium hydrophilic mucilloid composition
US4511553 *Apr 27, 1984Apr 16, 1985Meggle Milchindustrie Gmbh & Co. KgCoating process and agent for carrying out the process
US4548806 *Jul 5, 1983Oct 22, 1985G. D. Searle & Co.Psyllium hydrophilic mucilloid composition
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US5126150 *Oct 1, 1990Jun 30, 1992The Procter & Gamble CompanyCompositions containing psyllium
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US7207330Jun 5, 2000Apr 24, 2007Innovata Biomed LimitedDelivery system
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US7464704Nov 22, 2002Dec 16, 2008Innovata Biomed LimitedMedicament delivery assembly
US7571723Mar 1, 2007Aug 11, 2009Innovata Biomed LimitedDelivery device
US7571724Mar 1, 2007Aug 11, 2009Innovata Biomed LimitedDelivery device
US8205614Aug 10, 2009Jun 26, 2012Innovata Biomed LimitedDelivery device
US8511302Apr 22, 2005Aug 20, 2013Innovata Biomed LimitedDose counter mechanisms for medicament delivery devices
US8652517 *Sep 22, 2005Feb 18, 2014Sandoz GmbhCoating of tablet cores
US8800550Nov 26, 2008Aug 12, 2014Innovata Biomed LimitedMedicament delivery assembly
US8851069Apr 21, 2005Oct 7, 2014Innovata Biomed LimitedInhaler
US20060034917 *Sep 22, 2005Feb 16, 2006Reinhard EntnerCoating of tablet cores
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Classifications
U.S. Classification424/479, 514/777, 427/2.18, 424/474, 514/951
International ClassificationA61K9/36, A61J3/00, A61K9/28, A61K9/30
Cooperative ClassificationA61K9/2826, A61K9/282, A61K9/2873, A61J3/005, Y10S514/951
European ClassificationA61K9/28H4, A61J3/00C, A61K9/28H6H, A61K9/28H4B