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Publication numberUS3798599 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 19, 1974
Filing dateFeb 24, 1972
Priority dateFeb 24, 1972
Publication numberUS 3798599 A, US 3798599A, US-A-3798599, US3798599 A, US3798599A
InventorsH Kafafian
Original AssigneeH Kafafian
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Single input controller for a communication system
US 3798599 A
Abstract
A communication system for the handicapped having a single-input transducer or switch and a dual output for operation of an office machine, typewriter or the like, or a display, or a punched or magnetic storage device, as well as almost any material where data or information is to be stored, printed, displayed, or otherwise used, e.g., through a device which may be a matrix. In a "Hold" embodiment, upon the first actuation of the input switch, a stepping switch is stepped to provide the first coordinate of the matrix. When the switch is deactivated, the stepping switch stops at a desired row, and a second stepping switch automatically moves to the desired column. Upon reactivation of the input switch, the second stepping switch stops at the desired column, and signals are sent out through the matrix to initiate activation of an element or elements. The activated element or elements may cause a letter on a typewriter to be typed or a lamp to light which displays a symbol, letter, or function, or any combinations thereof. Whereupon, the stepping switches are reset and the system is ready to accept other signals.
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llnite States atent Kafafian 1 Mar. 19, 1974 SINGLE INPUT CONTROLLER FOR A COMMUNICATION SYSTEM [76] Inventor: Haig Kafafian, 4201 Cathedral Ave.

N.W., Washington, DC. 20008 [22] Filed: Feb. 24, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 229,089

[52] US. Cl. 340/147 R, 340/166 R, 340/164 R [51] Int. Cl. H01] 29/00, G06c 7/00 [58] Field of Search 340/365 R, 324 R, 147 R, 340/166 R [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,022,878 2/1962 Seibel 340/365 R 3,220,000 11/1965 Lesage 340/365 R 3,317,783 5/1967 Neumeister... 340/324 UX 3,480,945 11/1969 Nelson 340/365 R 3,541,541 ll/l970 Engelbart 340/324 R Primary Examiner-Harold l. Pitts Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Bacon & Thomas [57] ABSTRACT A communication system for the handicapped having a single-input transducer or switch and a dual output for operation of an office machine, typewriter or the like, or a display, or a punched or magnetic storage device, as well as almost any material where data or information is to be stored, printed, displayed, or otherwise used, e.g., through a device which may be a matrix. In a Hold" embodiment, upon the first actuation of the input switch, a stepping switch is stepped to provide the first coordinate of the matrix. When the switch is deactivated, the stepping switch stops at a desired row, and a second stepping switch automatically moves to the desired column. Upon reactivation of the input switch, the second stepping switch stops at the desired column, and signals are sent out through the matrix to initiate activation of an element or elements. The activated element or elements may cause a letter on a typewriter to be typed or a lamp to light which displays a symbol, letter, or function, or any combinations thereof. Whereupon, the stepping switches are reset and the system is ready to accept other signals.

In a No-Hold embodiment of the invention, upon a first actuation of the input switch, therow stepping .switch commences to step. Upon a second actuation of the input switch, the row stepping switch stops at the desired row, and at the same time a column stepping switch automatically starts stepping along the matrix. When the desired column is reached, the input switch is actuated a third time, and a signal is fed to actuate an element in the matrix to type a letter, etc.

7 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures PATENTEDHARIQ IBM 3 7'98 599 sum x w SHEU 2 OF 4 6 3 QU B $4 Y9 #3 Kk PF @2 WW 6 0 WW V Uu 7 6 4 COLUMN PATENTEDNAR 19 I974 SINGLE INPUT CONTROLLER FOR A COMMUNICATION SYSTEM BACKGROUND AND OBJECTS The present invention relates to a system for operatin g typewriters and other program-controlled machines or devices which are particularly adapted for use by physically and/or neurologically impaired individuals in need of communication and control means.

If reference is made to the extensive introductory portion of my previous US Pat. No. 3,507,376, issued Apr. 21, 1970, there will be provided extensive background inforrnation upon which that invention, as well as my instant invention is based. Both serve the purpose of aiding severely disabled persons who have limited capability to communicate or to use their fingers, hands, feet, limbs, tongue, or other portion of the body to operate a plurality of bilaterally or unilaterally controlled interfaces to program a typewriter or other device. My patent application, Ser. No. 220,995, filed Jan. 26, 1972, illustrated a device utilizing seven switches which can be operated by a handicapped individual in a great variety of manners, depending upon his physical and/or neurological capabilities.

It is possible for an individual who is handicapped to initially be able physically to program the switches in my original patent, but due to progressive debilitation is precluded from controlling the multiple key interfaces at a later date. However, he may be able, without learning a new code, to operate the seven switches as in my above-mentioned patent application. But again because of further debilitation, he may be able to only operate and program a single switch or transducer.

Hence, it is proposed, in keeping with the needs of a person limited in his control capability, to provide him with means whereby the simple actuation of one switch in accordance with the very same predetermined code he has already learned will operate the typewriter, display, or the communication or control system.

A considerable amount of prior art was cited in my earlier patent and referred to in the previously filed application. All of the references had shortcomings for certain severely disabled persons. US Pat. No. 3,241,115, for instance, includes a device having embodiments for use by a partially or totally paralyzed person. In one of its embodiments the control switch in the system actuates various functions where the number of functions actuated is obviously limited to the tasks to be performed and would not be practical for something such as a typewriter which has a considerable number of functions to be controlled. Another embodiment which can be used with a typewriter uses two switches, extensive circuitry and code memorization for operation thereof. The instant invention overcomes this need for two switches, and is in fact operable from a simple easily memorized, dual-input, programming code which is common to a whole family of programmable interfaces which serve as controls by providing only the need for an individual to operate one switch having only one contact, and is much more economical. The ease of operation and the commonality of the programmed code is of tremendous advantage to the extremely debilitated, severely disabled individual.

It is therefore an object of the instant invention to provide a system which is extremely easy for an almost totally paralyzed individual to utilize and which overcomes all the shortcomings of the prior art.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION A Hold embodiment of the invention includes a single input switch or other transducer together with an output which may be in the form of a matrix connected to a display, typewriter, or other machine either directly or through a converter, depending on the drive requirements of the machine or other functioning device. Connected between the input switch and the output matrix are a plurality of logic elements, pulsegenerating-type devices and two stepping switches. Upon the first actuation of the input switch, the first (or row) of two stepping switches will be sequentially stepped through a series of positions until a desired row in the matrix is selected. Upon deactuation of the input switch the second (or column) stepping switch will be automatically sequentially stepped through a second series of positions until a desired column in the matrix is selected. When the desired column of the matrix is reached, thus locating an element in the matrix connected to a particular external device, the input switch is again actuated and a signal will be generated and sent out through the stepping switches, thereby energizing the particular element in the matrix which in turn will, in the case of a typewriter cause a specific function to be typed. Upon deactuation of the input switch, the stepping switches are restored to their zero or start positions, and the system will be reset to accept the next dual-input of the single input switch or transducer.

In a No-Hold embodiment of the invention additional logic elements are added to the Hold embodiment wherein it is not necessary to hold the input switch after the first actuation to keep the row switch stepping. A second actuation of the input switch will stop the row stepping switch and automatically start the column stepping switch. A third actuation of the input switch will stop the column stepping switch and cause an output signal to be generated, thereby producing the desired function of the human controller.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The novel features and uniqueness of the invention are set forth in the appended claims. The invention itself, both as to its construction and manner of operation, together with additional objects and advantages thereof, will be understood from the following description when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram of a single-input switch or other transducer system designated as the Hold embodiment;

FIG. 2 is a chart showing a dual-input machine language designed for use and operation of a typewriter or other programmable device; and

FIG. 3 and FIG. 3A are a schematic diagram of a similar system designated as the No-Hold embodiment.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE HOLD EMBODIMENT The system illustrated in FIG. 1 of the drawing is an apparatus designed to operate in real time. Essentially, it is a hard-wire device, except for the transducer which may be a photocell, reactive coupling, etc. As shown, when the system is turned on, the charging action of a capacitor C1 through a resistor R1 serves to maintain the output of an inverter I1 high for a short period. The high output signal from the inverter 11 resets a plurality of control binaries CB1, CB2, and CB3. The control binaries CB2 and CB3 are reset from inverter I1, via a line 1, an OR gate G1 and a line 2. The control binary CB1 is reset from inverter 11, via line 1, an OR gate G2 and a line 3. Also when the power is turned on, the momentarily high output of inverter 11 is connected to the reset coil of a row stepping switch 5, and the reset coil of a column stepping switch 6, via line 1, an OR gate G3, a line 4, and a reset solenoid driver 7, thus resetting a plurality of selective directing means in the form of a pair of mechanically-ganged switchbanks to their zero positions. The ganged switches are designated as RSS(13) and CSS(1-3).

A single-input interface transducer or switching means shown in the form of a single-pole, single-throw, normally open switch 8 has its movable contact connected to ground. Obviously, the switch could be of the reactive type or of a type which can be actuated by a slight movement ofa muscle. Also, it could be an inertialess switch such as a photoelectric device which responds to an interruption of a light beam, to the movement of the eyeball, blinking of the eyelid, movement of a controllable portion or portions of the body, operable from control signals generated by muscles or signals of the central nervous system of the human controller. Further, the input transducer may be operable by other signals from the human controller, such as controllable acoustic signals, temperature, odor, etc. Additionally, one or more switches 8a may be included in parallel whereby the operator can continue to communicate if one portion of the body tires.

Actuation of the switch 8 will set control binary CB1 through a NOR gate G4, and via a line 10. The other input of gate G4 is connected to the output of CB2 (which is in the reset state) via a line 9.

The output of CB] is connected to the control input of a step-pulse generator 11 via a line 12, the output of which (while CB1 is set) is a series of pulses, and the rate of which is controlled by the setting of stepping speed control R2. The stepping pulses are fed to one input of an AND gate G via a line 13. A second of the other inputs of gate G5 is connected to the output of CB2 through the inverter 12 and a line 14. A third input is connected to the stationary contact of the single input switch 8 via a line 14, an inverter I3, and a line 16. The fourth input on the AND gate G5 is connected to the eighth position of the second bank of row stepping switches labeled RSS(2). The output of gate G5 is connected to the stepping solenoid of a row stepping switch 17 through row stepping switch driver 19. As long as the single input switch 8 is held actuated, the row stepping switch will step progressively through its range at a rate determined by a setting of a stepping speed control illustrated as a variable resistance R2.

Upon deactuation of switch 8, control binary CB2 will be set by the output of an AND gate G6, via a line 21. The inputs of gate G6 are connected to the output of CB1 via a line 22 and to the switch 8 via line 15. The output of CB2 closes gate G5 through inverter I2 and line 14, thus stopping the stepping action of the row stepping switch 17. Also, the output of CB2, via a line 23 is connected to an input of an AND gate G7. The other inputs of the AND gate are connected to the steppuise generator 11 via line 13, and the stationary contact of the switch 8 via line 15. Thus, deactuation of the single input switch 8, following its actuation, allows a stepping solenoid 24 of a column stepping switch to be driven by the step pulse generator 11 via line 13, gate G7, and a column switch driver 25. As long as the switch 8 remains unactuated {after its initial actuation), the column stepping switch CSS will step progressively through its range at a rate determined by the stepping speed control setting on R2.

When the single input switch 8 is actuated for the second time, control binary CB3 will be set from an output of an AND gate G8. The inputs of the gate G8 are connected to the output of CB2 via line 26 and the stationary contact of switch 8 via line 15 and inverter I3. Control binary CB1 is reset by the output of CB3, via a line 27, the gate G2 and line 3. With CB1 in the reset state, the step-pulse generator 11 is disabled via the signal on line 12. The output of CB3 also starts a print pulse generator 31, the output of which is a series of pulses at a fixed repetition rate. Also, the output of NAND gate G9, with inputs from CB3 via line 27 and from the switch 8 via line 15 and 13 removes the reset signal from a print binary 29 and enables a NOR gate G10 via a line 30. The other input to gate G10 is from the output of the print binary 29 via a iine 31a. The output of gate G10 is connected to the selected row of the matrix 32 via a line 33, a matrix row driver 34, a line 35, and the selected step of the first bank of the row stepping switch RSS(1). Also, the output of gate G10 connects the selected column of the matrix 32 via line 33, a matrix column driver 36, a line 37 and the selected step of the first bank of the column stepping switch CSS(l). The matrix 32 is in turn connected to a typewriter 38 in a known manner.

It will be understood that in place of the matrix 32, an ASCII code converter 50 or the like and a solenoid drive device can be used in connection with an input- /output typewriter 52 of the type sold by IBM under the trademark SELECTRIC, or a CRT. Also, a telephone line 54 could be used with a coder 56 and decoder 58 to convey information to a CRT, I/O typewriter lamp, or alpha-numeric display 60.

It is further contemplated that the output could be connected through known means to a drum or other recorded means whereby an audible output could be generated for feed.

When a switch 39 having single and repeat" positions is in thesingle position, the output of the print binary 29 is connected to an input of an AND gate G11 via an inverter 14, and the switch 39. This arrangement allows the first pulse output of the print pulse generator 31 to set the print binary 29, closing gate G10 via line 31a. This will remove the input drive signal via line 33 to the matrix row and column drivers 34 and 36, thus causing cessation of the row and column matrix drive signals. Also, the output of the print binary via inverter I4 and switch 39 closes gate G11, preventing subsequent changes in the state of the print binary 29 as a result of the output pulses from the print pulse generator 31. Thus, with the switch 39 in the single position, one and only one output drive signal is provided from the controller to the matrix 32.

With the switch 39 in the repeat position, the output of the print binary 29 is prevented from closing gate G11, allowing the print binary 29 to change state with every pulse from the print oscillator 31. Thus, a repetitive, square-wave drive signal is provided to the matrix row and column drivers 34 and 36 for a long as the single input switch 8 is held actuated.

When the single input switch 8 is released, a signal is transmitted via lines 15 and 40 to one input of an AND gate G12, the other input of which is connected to the output of CB3 via line 27. The output of gate G12 provides a drive signal to the stepping switch reset solenoids 5 and 6 through gate G3 over line 4, and the reset solenoid driver 7. This causes both stepping switches to reset to their zero positions. Also, the signal from switch 8, via line 15, inverter I3 and line 41 closes gate 9, in turn closing gate 10 via line 30. This causes a cessation of the matrix drive signals and resets the print binary 29.

When the row stepping switch returns to the zero position, control binary CB2 and CB3 are reset from the zero position of row stepping switch RSS(2), a line 43, an inverter 15, gate G1 and line 2. The gate G12 is closed by the output of CB3 via line 27, thus removing the drive signal from the two stepping switch reset solenoids 5 and 6. With both stepping switches at their zero positions the three binaries CB1, CB2, and CB3 reset, and the print binary 29 also reset, the controller is in its initial state ready to receive another set of sequential inputs via the single input switch 8.

If the row stepping switch RSS is allowed to drive to position 8, gate 5 will be closed by the signal from position 8 of bank 2 of the row stepping switch RSS(2), via a line 45, stopping the stepping action of RSS. Release of the switch 8 will set CB2 as before, but the output of CB2, via line 23 to an input of an AND gate G13 will produce a drive signal to the two stepping switch reset solenoids 5 and 6 via a line 47, gate G3, line 4, and the reset solenoid driver 7. The other input to G13 is connected to line 45, through inverter I6. Thus, the row and column stepping switches RSS and CSS will be reset to their zero positions. The control binary CB2 will be reset and the drive signal to the reset solenoid of the stepping switches will be caused to cease as before. Also, control binary CB1 will be reset by RSS(2) reaching the zero position, via line 43, inverter 15, gate G2, and line 3. The controller is thus reset and ready to receive another set of sequential inputs.

If the column stepping switch CSS is allowed to drive to position 8, a stepping switch reset pulse will be produced at the output of gate G3 as a result of the connection between position 8 of the second bank of the column stepping switch CSS(2) and an input of gate G3 via a line 47 and inverter 17. The stepping switches and the control binaries will be reset as before and the controller will be ready to accept another set of sequential inputs.

The third bank of the two stepping switches, RSS(3) and CSS(3) are available for controlling a pair of lamp displays 62R and 62C in order to provide feedback to the operator related to the positions of the two stepping switches in order to facilitate controller operation. The lamp display could also be a single bank of lights with a matrix input, thereby giving a display of the function types. It will be appreciated that an acoustical and/or palpaple vibration means could be used instead of or together with the lamp display.

FIG. 2 is the chart showing the position of the letters of the English alphabet with symbols and functions which appear on many typewriters.

It should be noted that this chart is used in conjunction with the dual-input programming code as used for a 14-input interface as described in my aforementioned patent. Thus, a person who has become weakened and has only a unilateral control capability need not learn a new code. Of course, the position of the letters and symbols can be re-arranged to suit an individuals need.

OPERATION OF THE HOLD EMBODIMENT The operation of the system of FIG. 1 just described will be seen briefly as it relates to the typing of a letter, for example, the letter H in FIG. 2. It is necessary to proceed two steps up the outside of the matrix to the second row, and then three steps along the matrix to the third column. Therefore, upon actuation of the transducer or switch 8, the control binary CB1 will be set through NOR gate G4 via line 10. The output of CB1 will then be connected to the step-pulse generator 11 via line 12. The speed of the output pulses of the generator is controlled by R2. The stepping pulses are then fed into the AND gate G5 via line 13. The output of G5, being connected to the row stepping switch driver 19 and the stepping solenoid of the row stepping switch 17, will connect the stream of pulses from generator 11 to the solenoid, thus driving the bank of row switches RSS(1-3). Switch 8 is held down a time sufficient to drive the RSS to the position two in RSS(l), i.e., to the second row. Upon deactuation of the single switch, input 8, the row stepping switch will stop. Therefore, by driving the switch 17 two steps, the desired row for typing an H will be reached.

Also, upon deactuation of switch 8, control binary CB2 will be set by the output of the AND gate G6 via line 21. The output of CB2, through inverter I2 and line 14 closes gate G5, thus stopping the stepping action of the row stepping solenoid 17 at the appropriate row in the matrix. The output of CB2 is also connected to the AND gate 7, as is output line 13 from the step-pulse converter 11, together with line 15 from the stationary contact of the signal input switch 8. Therefore, as long as switch 8 remains deactuated, the column stepping switch will step progressively through its range at the rate at which pulses are received from the step-pulse generator 11.

When the desired column is reached, i.e., when the column stepping switch solenoid 24 has driven CSS( 1) to the third column, switch 8 is again actuated. In the instant'exarnple, this will mean that CSS(l) is at position three.

As explained in detail above, when the switch 8 is actuated for the second time, control binary CB3 will be set and CB1 reset, thus disabling the step-pulse generator 11 via the signal on line 12. The output from CB3 will start the print pulse generator 31, the output of which is a series of pulses at a fixed repetition rate. Also, the output of NAND gate G9 removes the reset signal from the print binary 29 and enables the NOR gate G10. The output of gate G10 is connected to the selected row of the matrix 32 via line 33, the matrix row driver 34, line 35 and the movable contact of the row stepping switch RSS(I). Further, the output of gate G10 connects the selected column of the matrix 32 via line 33, the matrix column driver 36, line 37 and the selected step of the column stepping switch CSS(l). Therefore, a signal will be generated over the line emanating from step two in RSS( 1) and step three in CSS(l) to the matrix. This will actuate an element in the matrix, which in turn is connected to a typewriter as illustrated in my previous patent and previously filed application, both of which are referred to above. Finally, upon release of the switch 8 the controller will be reset to its initial state and a new letter may be typed.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF NO-HOLD" EMBODIMENT The system illustrated in FIG. 3 and FIG. 3A of the drawing is essentially similar to FIG. 1, with the exception of the input apparatus. When the power is turned on the charging action of capacitor C1 through resistor R2 serves to maintain the input of the inverter 11 low for a short period. Control binaries CB1, CB2 and CB3, as well as a switch binary 70, are reset during this period by the output of inverter II. Control binary CB1 is reset from inverter l1, via line 1, and OR gate G2 and line 3, while control binary CB1 is reset via line 1, or gate G2 and line 3. The switch binary 70 is reset via line 1, a line 72, an OR gate G14, and a line 74. Also, at power turn-on, the momentarily high output of I1 is connected to the reset coils 5 and 6 of RSS-RST and CSS-RST via line 1, the OR gate G3, line 4, and the reset solenoid driver 7, thus resetting the three switch banks of each of the two stepping switches to their zero positions. It will be appreciated that in another embodiment of both the No-Hold and Hold embodiments solid state switching means could be employed rather than the illustrated mechanically gang stepping switches.

As in the preceding embodiment, a single-input, single-pole, single-throw, normally open switch 8' is illustrated as having a movable contact connected to ground and a fixed contact connected to an inverting input buffer 76. As above, it will be apparent that a pressureless or inertialess switch can be used, such as known photoelectric, capacitive, inductive, reactive devices or the like. Actuation of switch 8 will result in a positive going step at the output of the inverting buffer 76. The leading edge of this step on line 78 will be differentiated by the action of a capacitor C2 and a resistor R3. The differentiated signal is connected to the toggle input of the switch binary 70 via a line 80. Thus, the switch binary will change to the set state. The output of the switch binary 70 is connected to an input of the NOR gate G4 through another NOR gate G16 and a line 82. The other input to gate G4 is connected to the output of CB2 (which is in the reset state) via line 9. The output of gate G4 will thus set CB1 via line 10 when switch 8' is actuated for the first time.

The output of CB1 is connected to the control input of the step pulse generator 11 via line 12, the output of which (while CB1 is set) is a series of pulses, the rate of which being controlled by the setting of the stepping speed control R2. The stepping pulses are fed to one input of the AND gate G5 via line 13. One of the other inputs of gate G5 is connected to the output of CB2 through inverter 12 and via line 14. A third input to gate G5 is connected to the output of gate G16 through lines 82 and 15, inverter I3 and line 16. Finally, the last input of gate G5 is connected to the eighth position of the second bank of the row stepping switch RSS(2) via line 45. The output of gate G5 is connected to stepping solenoid 17 of the row stepping switch through the row stepping switch driver 19. The row stepping switch will continue to step progressively through its range at a rate determined by the preset setting of the stepping speed control R2 whether the switch 8 is held actuated or released.

When the switch 8 is actuated for the second time (after first having been deactuated), the switch binary will be toggled as before, resulting in its being in the reset state. The reset state output signal from the switch binary is again connected to one input of gate G16. The other input of gate G16 is connected to the output of an AND gate G15. Since one of the inputs to gate G15 is connected to the output of CB3 (in the reset state) via line 27, the output of G16 will be controlled by the reset state of the switch binary 70. The control binary CB2 will be set by the output gate G16 via line 15 through AND gate G6 and via line 21. The other input of gate G6 is connected to the output of CB1 in the set state. The output of CB2, through inverter I2 and line 14 closes gate G5, thus stopping the stepping action of the row stepping switch. Also, the output of CB2 is connected to an input of AND gate G7. The other inputs of gate G7 are connected to the stepping pulse generator via line 13 and the output of G16, via lines 82 and 15. Thus, the second actuation of the single input switch 8 allows the stepping solenoid 24 of the column stepping switch CSS to be driven by the step-pulse gen erator 11, via line 13, gate G7, and the column switch driver 25. The column stepping switch will step progressively through its range at a rate determined by the setting of the stepping speed control R2, whether the switch 8' is held actuated or released.

When the single-input switch 8' is actuated for the third time (again, after first having been deactuated for the second time), the switch binary 70 will be toggled as before which results in its being in the set state. The doubly inverted set state output of the switch binary 70 is impressed on one input of the AND gate G8, via lines 82 and 15 and inverter 13. The other input of gate G8 is connected to the output of CB2 (in the set state) via line 26. The control binary CB3 will then be set by the output of gate G8.

The set state output of CB3 resets switch binary 70 via line 27, a delay network 84 a line 86, gate G14 and line 74. The output of CB3 is also connected to an input of gate G15 via line 27. The other input of gate G15 is connected to the output of the inverting input buffer 76 via line 88. The output of Gate G15 is connected to one input of G16. Thus, though the switch binary has been reset by the output of CB3, the state of the signal on line 16 will not change provided the switch 8 is held actuated. The purpose of the delay network 84 is to assure that the set state output of CB3 will be in control of the output state of gate G16 prior to the reset of the switch binary 70 by the same output of CB3. CB1 is reset by the output of CB3 via line 27, gate G2, and line 3. With CB1 in the reset state, the pulse generator 11 is disabled by the control signal on line 12 from CB1.

The output of CB3 starts the print pulse generator 31, the output of which is a series of pulses at a fixed repetition rate. Also, the output of the NAND gate G9, with inputs from CB3 via line 28 and from gate 16 via line 15, inverter I3 and line 41, removes the reset signal from the print binary 29 and enables a NOR gate G10 via line 30. The other input to the gate G10 is from the output of the print binary 29 via line 31. The output of gate G10 is connected to the selected row of the matrix 32, through the matrix row dirver 34, line 35, the selected step of the first bank of the row stepping switch RSS(l and the seven-wire connection. Also, the output of gate G10 connects the selected column of the matrix 32, through matrix column driver 36, line 37, the selected step of the first bank of the column stepping switch CSS(1), and the seven-wire connection. The matrix 32 is in turn connected to a typewriter 38 via a multi-wire cable in a known manner. As stated above in regard to FIG. 1, the output of the matrix could be connected to a variety of other devices. Also, instead of the matrix the type device can be connected through a code converter and solenoid drive system, as well as an audio output from a record having the alphabet and/or other functions recorded thereon.

With the switch 39 in the single position, the reset output of the print binary 29 enables an AND gate G11 through the inverter I4 and switch 39. This arrangement allows the first pulse output of the print pulse generator 31 to toggle the print binary 29 to the set state, closing gate G10 via line 31a, and removing the input drive signal via line 33 to the matrix row and column drivers 34 and 36, thus causing a cessation of the row and column matrix drive signals. Also, the output of the print binary through inverter 14 and switch 39 closes gate G11, preventing subsequent changes in the state of the print binary 29 as a result of the output pulses from the print pulse generator 31. Thus, with the switch 39 in the single position, one and only one output drive signal is provided from the controller to the matrix 32.

With the switch 39 in the repeat position, the gate Gll is continuously enabled through switch 39, allowing the print binary 29 to change state with every pulse from the print oscillator 31. Thus, a repetitive squarewave drive signal is provided to the selected row and column producing repetitive drive to the selected function for as long as the third actuation of switch 8 is held.

When the switch 8' is released (following the third actuation), the change in output state of the inverting input buffer 50 connected to one input of gate G16 (via line 88, gate G15) will, in conjunction with a reset state output signal of the switch binary 70 impressed on the other input of gate G16, result in a change in state of the output of gate G16. The output ofgate G16 is transmitted via lines 82, 15 and 40 to one input of the AND gate G12. The other input of gate G12 is connected to the output of CB3 via line 27. The output of gate G12 provides a drive signal to the stepping switch resetsolenoid and 6, via gate G3, line 4 and the reset solenoid driver 7, causing both stepping switches to reset to their zero positions. Also, the signal from gate G16, via lines 82 and 15, inverter I3 and line 41 closes the gate G9, the output of which in turn closes gate G via line 30. Thus, the matrix drive signals cease. Further, the output of gate G9 resets the print binary 29.

When the row stepping switch returns to the zero position, control binary CB2 and CB3 are reset from the zero position contact of RSS(2), line 43, inverter I5, gate G1 and line 2. The gate G12 is closed by the reset output of CB3 via line 27, thus removing drive from the two stepping switch reset solenoids 5 and 6. With both stepping switches at their zero positions and the three control binaries, the print binary 29 and the switch binary 70 reset, the controller is in its initial state ready to receive another set of three sequential inputs via input switch 8'.

If the row stepping switch RSS is allowed to drive to position 8, gate G5 will be closed by the signal from position 8 of the second bank of the row stepping switch RSS(2), via line 45, stopping the stepping action of RSS. A second actuation of switch 8 under this condition will set CB2 as before, but the output of CB2 via line 9 to an input of AND gate G13 in conjunction with a signal to the other input from position 8 of RSS(2) via line 45 and inverter I6, will produce a drive signal to the two stepping switch reset solenoids 5 and 6 through gate G3 and the reset solenoid driver 7. Thus, the row and column stepping switches RSS and CSS are reset to their zero positions. The control binary CB2 will be reset and the drive signal to the reset solenoids of the stepping switches caused to cease as before. Also, control binary CB1 will be reset by RSS(2) reaching the zero position, via line 43, inverter I5, gate G'Z-and line 3. The controller is thus reset and ready to receive another set of three sequential inputs via the single input switch 8.

If the column stepping switch CSS is allowed to drive to position 8, a stepping switch reset pulse will be produced at the output of gate G3 as a result of the connection between position 8 of the second bank of the column stepping switch CSS(2) and an input of gate G3 via line 47 and inverter I7. The stepping switches in the control binaries will be reset as before and the controller will be ready to accept another set of sequential inputs.

As above, the third bank of the two stepping switches, RSS(3) and CSS(3) are available for controlling a lamp display to provide feedback to the operator related to the positions of the two stepping switches to facilitate controller operation. Also, as above, it will be appreciated that an acoustical and/or palpable vibration means can be used instead of, or together with, the lamp display.

OPERATION OF THE NO-HOLD EMBODIMENT The operation of FIG. 3 and FIG. 3A just described will be seen briefly as it relates to the typing of a letter, for example the letter B in FIG. 2. As was discussed above, it is necessary to proceed two steps up the outside of the matrix to the second row, and then three steps along the matrix to the third column. Therefore, upon a first actuation of the transducer 8, a positive going step will result at the output of the inverting buffer 76. A signal will then be fed after differentiation into the switch binary thus changing it to its set state. The signal passing through NOR gates G16 and G4 will set CB1. The output of CB1 controls the step pulse generator 11 which feeds a series of stepping pulses through gate G5 and the row stepping switch driver 19 to the stepping solenoid of the row stepping switch 17. The row stepping switch will continue to step progressively through its range at a rate determined by the speed control setting, whether or not the switch 8' is held actuated or released.

Upon a second actuation of switch 8, the switch binary 70 will again be toggled. The output of gate G16 will set control binary CB2 via gate G6. The output of CB2, through inverter I2 will close gate G5, thus stopping the stepping action of the row stepping switch.

Therefore, an initial actuation of the switch will start the row stepping switch moving up the matrix. When it reaches the desired row, a second actuation will stop the row stepping switch movement. However, since the output of CB2 is also connected to the input of gate G7 (another input of which is connected to the step pulse generator 11), the column stepping switch CSS will start stepping due to the signal through gate G7 and column stepping switch driver 25 to the solenoid 24. In this instance as well as above, the column stepping switch will step progressively through its range whether the switch 8' is held actuated or released.

When switch 8' is actuated for the third time, the switch binary 70 will again be toggled. Since the output of gate G16 is also connected to the input of gate G8 through line 15 and inverter I3, CB3 will be set via the output of gate G8. The set state of CB3 then resets the switch binary 70 through line 27, through the delay network and OR gate G14. The output of CB3 is also connected to gate G15 which in turn is connected to an input of gate G16. Thus, though the switch binary has been reset by the output of CB3, the state of the signal on line 15 will not change provided that the switch 8' is held actuated. As stated above, the purpose of the delay line 84 is to insure that the set state of output CB3 will be in control of the output state of gate G16 prior to the reset of the switch binary 70 by the same output of CB3. Since CB1 will be reset by the output of CB3, line 27, gate .G2 and line 3, the step-pulse generator 11 is disabled via the control signal from CB1.

Therefore, upon the third actuation of switch 8, the column stepping switch is stopped, and in the instant example, this will be after it has stepped to the third column. Thus, the row stepping switch RSS( 1) is at the second contact and the column stepping switch CSS(1) is at the third contact.

The output of CB3 is also connected to the input of gate G9, which in turn controls the print binary 29. At the same time the output from CB3, connected to the print pulse generator 31, starts sending a series of pulses through gate G11 to the print binary 29. The output of the print binary being connected to gate G10, as is the output of gate G9, via 30, will send signals to the selected points in the matrix via the matrix row driver 34 and the matrix column driver 36. This in turn will actuate the appropriate element in the matrix, which in turn will type the H on the typewriter.

Finally, the controller will be reset to its initial state and a new letter may be typed.

OTHER EMBODIMENTS There are other embodiments which fall within the scope of the invention which would be obvious to one skilled in the art, depending upon the needs of the individual operator. An example would be a system which provided an operation as follows:

1. Upon a first actuation of the input switch, RSS would begin to step, stopping at the first position. It would be necessary for a second actuation of the input switch to step RSS to the second position; a third actuation, to a third position, etc.

2. Upon completion of the above actuations, CSS will begin stepping, and continue to step until the: desired column is reached.

3. When the desired column is reached, the input switch is actuated a final time. CSS will then stop, the

print signals will be generated, and the solenoids reset.

While specific forms of the invention have been described herein, it is to be understood that the same is merely illustrative of the principles involved and that other forms may be resorted to within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A dual-input, programmed, man-machine communication system comprising:

a. a single input interface,

b. means for selectively directing a pair of complete man/machine language output signals representative of two unique designators,

c. utilization means adapted to be connected to said directing means for providing a resultant indication representative of the pair of output signals, and

a'. logic means connected between said single input interface and said directing means for selecting the pair of output signals in accordance with at least two successive actuations of said single input interface, including means for inhibiting the transmission of the first of said pair of output signals selected until after selection of the second of said pair of output signals, wherein a coordinate output is transmitted after said second selection by said directing means, said coordinate output being representative of the two unique designators whereby a resultant indication is produced for each pair of designators.

2. A communication system as defined in claim 1 wherein said utilization means includes a typewriter.

3. A communication system as defined in claim 1 including means for coupling the unique designators to at least one of the senses of the human controller.

4. A communication system as defined in claim 1 including a matrix connected to a pair of said selective directing means, said matrix including a plurality of rows and a plurality of columns.

5. A communication system as defined in claim 4 wherein said pair of selective directing means are stepping means, one of said stepping means being connected to the rows of said matrix and the other of said stepping means being connected to the columns of said matrix.

6. A communication system as defined in claim 5 wherein said logic means includes means for stepping one of said stepping means upon a first actuation of said input interface, stopping said one stepping means and automatically stepping said other stepping means upon a first deactuation, and stopping the other of said stepping means and generating signals to the selection row and column upon a second actuation.

7. A communication system as defined in claim 5 in cluding means for stepping one of said stepping means upon a first actuation of said input interface, stopping said one stepping means and stepping the other of said stepping means upon a second actuation, and stopping said other of said stepping means upon a third actua- HOB.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification341/21
International ClassificationG09B21/00, A61F4/00, B41J7/00
Cooperative ClassificationG09B21/00, B41J7/005, A61F4/00
European ClassificationG09B21/00, A61F4/00, B41J7/00B