Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3798700 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 26, 1974
Filing dateAug 28, 1972
Priority dateAug 28, 1972
Publication numberUS 3798700 A, US 3798700A, US-A-3798700, US3798700 A, US3798700A
InventorsPopeil S
Original AssigneePopeil Brothers
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Molded mop head
US 3798700 A
Abstract
A replaceable wringer mop head with a substantially square cross section is formed from a single piece of cellular sponge, preferably with a reinforcing mesh closely adjacent the exterior. A pair of mounting spools are located at opposed ends of the replaceable mop head, and tied securely to each end of the cellular sponge by means of a clamping ring. Both of the spools are provided with means for longitudinally engaging a corresponding fin on a wringer type mop holder which, in one position, is fixed. In the other two alternative positions, approximately 90 DEG of freedom is afforded the mop head with regard to the shaft of the wringer mop. Upon reciprocating the mop, at each stroke reversal, alternate adjacent mop head faces engage the surface being mopped. The wringer mop is of the character in which the far end can be rotated by rotating one of the spools, and the opposite spool secured to the end that the mop head may be wrung dry of water by such rotation.
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Unite States Pate Popeil 1 Mar. 26, 1974 1 MOLDED MOP HEAD [75] Inventor: Samuel J. Popeil, Chicago, 111.

[73] Assignee: Popeil Brothers, Inc., Chicago, Ill.

[22] Filed: Aug. 28, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 284,353

[52] US. Cl. 15/228, 15/120 R, 15/144 R, 15/244 A [51] Int. Cl. A471 13/142, A471 13/16 [58] Field ofSearch 15/116 A, 119 A, 120 R, 15/120 A, 144 R, 210 R, 228, 230.11, 244 A, 98

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3.419930 l/l969 Grunert 15/144 X 3.616483 11/1971 Mantelct 15/120 A 3.699.603 10/1972 Popeil 15/244 A 3.750.220 8/1973 Popeil et a1... 15/228 2.644.182 7/1953 Siegel 15/119 A FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 623.878 2/1963 Belgium 15/119 A Primary ExaminerDaniel Blum Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Dominik, Knechtel, Godula & Demeur [57] ABSTRACT A replaceable wringer mop head with a substantially square cross section is formed from a single piece of cellular sponge, preferably with a reinforcing mesh closely adjacent the exterior. A pair of mounting spools are located at opposed ends of the replaceable mop head, and tied securely to each end of the cellular sponge by means of a clamping ring. Both of the spools are provided with means for longitudinally engaging a corresponding fin on a wringer type mop holder which, in one position, is fixed. 1n the other two alternative positions, approximately 90 of freedom is afforded the mop head with regard to the shaft of the wringer mop. Upon reciprocating the mop. at each stroke reversal, alternate adjacent mop head faces engage the surface being mopped. The wringer mop is of the character in which the far end can be rotated by rotating one of the spools, and the opposite spool secured to the end that the mop head may be wrung dry of water by such rotation.

12 Claims, 18 Drawing Figures PAIENIEDmazs 1974 SHEET 2 OF 4 FIG.5

PATENTEDmzs I974 SHEEI Q [If 4 B E F MOLDED MOP HEAD CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The subject matter of the present invention relates to the type of wringer mop of the character disclosed in Nicholson U.S. Pat. No. 2,118,618 and Mantelet U.S. Pat. No. 3,616,483 in which the self-wringing action of the mop head is made possible by a host structure or environment.

The mop head such as shown in Mantelet U.S. Pat. No. 3,616,483 has a cloth surface which is quite thick and may impede the transition of moisture in and out of the sponge-type material. Other mop heads of the sponge type such as Brown U.S. Pat. No. 2,955,309 when used in washing walls, can be severely abraded by flecks of dirt and other impurities which become embedded in the paint on the wall. By using the reinforcing mesh such as described in Buchkremer U.S. Pat. No. 2,913,772 a much more abrasive resistant surface results.

The mop head assembly of co-pending U.S. Pat. application Ser. No. 119,160 is rectangular in cross section, and therefore the two narrow faces, because of their relative instability, can seldom be used as a mopping or working face.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention looks to the provision of a mop head which is generally square in cross section, and has a pair of spools which permit 90 rotation on the host wringer mop. As a result of the 90 available rotation, by reciprocating the mop back and forth, it will flip flop between one face on the pushing stroke, and one face on the pulling stroke, thereby utilizing two of the four faces of the mop head. By reversing the mop head on the wringer mop assembly, the opposite two faces are similarly used. Thus the wear, dirt absorption, water absorption, and cleaning faces may be distributed over the entire periphery of the mop head.

In accordance with another aspect of the invention, the mop head is molded of a cellulose-type sponge, providing it with a chamois-like exterior surface, and optionally providing a reinforcing mesh closely adjacent the surface to significantly lengthen the life of the mop head assembly against abrasion primarily encountered in washing walls and other rough surfaces. When the reinforcing mesh is substantially a cotton base material, good absorption of water occurs through the wicking action assist to the sponge given by the cotton.

In view of the foregoing it will become apparent that one of the principal objects of the present invention is to provide a wringer mop replaceable head which is so constructed that, in combination with a particular wringer mop, it will flip flop in operation utilizing two of the four adjacent faces, and be reversed to utilize the other two adjacent faces to the end that wear, water absorption, and dirt retention may be uniformly distributed over the entire face of the mop head.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a mop head of the character set forth in which the same can be immobilized where one fixed position of the mop head is desired.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a wringer mop replaceable head with a reinforcing element which does not impede the moisture retaining or expressing characteristics of the mop, and yet significantly improves the strength characteristics of the material in wringing usage as well as washing and scrubbing abrasive-like surfaces.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a mop head of the character described which insures a relatively inexpensive replaceable construction.

DESCRIPTION OF ILLUSTRATIVE DRAWINGS The foregoing objects and advantages as well as the inventions embodied herein will be better understood taken in conjunction with the accompanying illustraing the motion of the mop head as the same is moved up and down a wall surface.

FIG. 3 is a sequential view related to FIG. 2 illustrating how the flip flop of the mop, depending upon the direction in which it is moving, affects the face which is engaging the wall.

FIG. 4 is a further sequential view of the mop head as shown in FIG. 3 illustrating the same after it has been reversed on the wringer assembly.

FIG. 5 is a further sequential view illustrating how the final mop head face is engaged by the wall surface, immediately subsequent to its positioning as shown in FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 is an end view of the subject mop head illustrating the same in its fixed or rigid position in which no flip flop occurs.

FIG. 7 is a perspective, partially broken view of the mop head illustrating the interior reinforcing fabric, the cutout portion, and the means for securing one spool to one end.

FIG. 8 is an enlarged fragmentary broken view illustrating one type of reinforcing mesh employed in the manufacture of the mop head.

FIG. 9 is another enlarged fragmented view illustrating another type of material employed for reinforcing the interior of the mop head.

FIG. 10 is a perspective view of the anchor spool and its associated cap which are fixed at one end to the illustrative mop head.

FIG. 11 is a longitudinal transverse section of the anchor spool shown in FIG. 10 taken along section line ll-ll of FIG. 7.

FIG. 12 is a transverse sectional view of the anchor spool taken along section line 12-12 of FIG. 11.

FIG. 13 is a perspective view of the wringer spool and its associated cap.

FIG. 14 is a longitudinal section of the wringer spool taken along section line 14l4 of FIG. 7.

FIG. 15 is a transverse sectional view of the wringer spool taken along section line l5l5 of FIG. 14.

FIG. 16 is one of three sequential views showing how the ring is clamped around the anchor spool, the cross section being taken at section line 1616 of FIG. 11.

FIG. 17 is a sequential view in the formation or completion of the banding showing, in the same scale and from the same viewpoint as FIG. 16, the second step of forming a dent in the ring.

FIG. 18 is a final view taken from the same vantage point and in the same scale as FIG. 16 and 17 showing how subsequent squeezing of the ring causes the dents as shown in FIG. 17 to become curled pigtails as shown in FIG. 18, completing the banding of the end of the cellular sponge block.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The mop head 20 illustrative of the present invention is best understood in its environment as removably secured to a wringer type mop holder of the character shown in FIG. 1 of the accompanying drawings. There it will be seen that the wringer mop holder 10 is secured at the end of a handle 11 and includes as its principal body portion a U-shaped head mount 12. A wringer having a wringer crank which is actuated by turning the same with the operator grasping the handle 27 is secured at its rotating end to the base of the wringer shaft 25. The wringer shaft is mounted in a wringer shaft support 28 having a pair of diametrically opposed anchor spool engaging fins 30. At the far end or free end of the wringer shaft 25 provision is made for a rotatable wringer snap assembly which has at the end of its body portion a snap head 43 and extending diametrically from the body portion in axially aligned orientation with the anchor spool fins 30 are a pair of wringer snap assembly fins 53. The anchor spool engaging fins 30 and thewringer spool engaging fins 53 are positioned in axial alignment for engagement with their corresponding anchor spool 31 and wringer spool 36 of the mop head 20.

The mop head 20 has an interior body formed from a sponge block 50. The particular type of sponge material conveniently employed in the making of the subject mop head is illustrated in US. Pat. No. 2,280,022. There it will be seen that a cellulosic pasty mass may be molded or extruded to form the sponges. One form of extruding such a mop head, with a cloth 40 at its exterior, is illustrated in US. Pat. No. 2,913,772. Referring to FIGS. 1 and 7, it will be seen that the cellular sponge appears interiorly of the mop head 20, and the reinforcing mesh 40 is immediately adjacent the exterior of the mop head 20. In actual form, because the mop head 20 is molded, a skin develops on the surface of the cellular sponge material, and the skin has a chamoislike consistency. The mesh 40 serves to reinforce the surface, and particularly the corners of the generally square cross section mop head 20 against tearing, and further against abrasion.

As illustrated in FIG. 8, an open weave-type mesh 40 may be employed, or as illustrated in FIG. 9, a woven webbing may be employed. In some instances a nylon or polyester reinforcing webbing 40 will be preferable, particularly in those cases where rough surfaces are to be washed. On the other hand, where repeated wring ing, but less abrasive surfaces are to be encountered such as kitchen floors, parkay floors, composition floors and the like, then a mercerized or even knitted cloth 40 will blend into the surface of the mop head 20 and further augment the chamois-like effect on the actual mopping, leaving a smooth or even polished finish in the drying effort.

One aspect of the invention looks to the flip flop arrangement whereby two adjacent faces are utilized in reciprocatingly stroking the mop. By first referring to FIG. 2, it will be seen that the mop is being pushed upwardly against the wall W as shown in the direction of the straight arrow. The effect of the friction against the surface engaged by face A is to attempt to rotate the mop head in the direction of the curved arrow. This is resisted by the engagement of the fin 53 at the end of the flip flop slots 38 against the ends of the flip flop slots 38 which define the fixed head slots 39.

At the end of the stroke in the pushing direction as shown in FIG. 2, the mop head is then returned toward the user in the direction of the straight arrow shown in FIG. 3. This causes the mop head 20 to rotate in the clockwise direction as illustrated by the curved arrow, and reverse the operative face from face A to face B against the wall W, with the fins 53 remaining in the same relative position, but at the opposite ends of the flip flop slots 38 and abutting the opposite member which defines the fixed head slots 39.

In FIG. 4, the configuration is shown in which the mop head 20 is rotated 180 from that shown in FIG. 2. Thereafter when the mop head 20 is pushed in the direction of the straight arrow or up the wall W as shown in FIG. 4, the tendency is to roll in the direction of the curved arrow at the lower portion of FIG. 4, thereafter abutting the fin 53 in the flip flop slots 38 as illustrated. On the return stroke, the direction of effect of the mop head 20 is that as shown at the curved arrow, and as illustrated in FIG. 6 the face D is presented to the wall W as the mop head 20 is moved in the direction of the straight arrow shown in FIG. 6, or towards the user. Thus by turning the mop head 20 I, instead of operating on faces A and B in the configuration as iilustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3, the mop head works on faces C and D as illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5. In this fashion, all four faces of the mop head, by regularly rotating the same can be subjected to the same amount of wear, and of course, the same amount ofexposure to dirt prior to any cleaning steps which may be undertaken. As illustrated in FIG. 6, the fixed head slots 39 can be employed to engage the fins 53, and then the mop head 20 becomes positively fixed onto the mop for such operations as wiping the top of doors, going under flat surfaces such as under couches, beds, and the like.

The specifics of the mop head 20 are shown in the cutaway view of FIG. 7. There it will be seen that the sponge body is encased by the reinforcing mesh 40, and handed at its two ends to the respective anchor spool 31 and wringer spool 36. More particularly, rings 61, 62 are employed at each end and secure the end of the reinforced sponge to the respective spools. The inter ior portion of the sponge 50 is provided with a wringer shaft bore 52. Prior to securing the rings 61,62 in place to secure the ends of the sponge 50 to the anchor spool 31 and wringer spool 36, the transverse cross section of the mop head sponge 50 is substantially uniform. In a successful commercial embodiment, the distances across the faces of the sponge block 50 are approxi mately 3% inches, making the same a 3% inch square. The length of the mop head 20 may vary between 8 and 10 inches. Variations in these dimensions are contemplated as within the scope of the invention, the same being set forth for purposes of illustrating a desirable commercial embodiment, and desirable proportions.

As observed in FIGS. 1 and 7, the mop head 20 is finished at its respective ends by the provision of a pair of end caps 41, 42. The anchor spool end cap 41 is provided with an opening 46 at the central portion. The wringer spool and cap 42 is imperforate at its end. Each of the end caps is provided with skirts 60 having annular internal snap rings 48, 49. The anchor cap snap ring 48, and the wringer cap snap ring 49, are of substantially the same configuration, and are proportioned to press-fittingly pass over the end of the wringer spool 36 and anchor spool 31 and lock in place with the skirts 60 approaching the sponge block 50 to mask the ring and its banded portion of the end of the sponge block 50. Alternative means for press-fittingly engaging the end caps 41, 42 are contemplated, such as male and female member snap fits respectively on the end caps 41, 42 and the anchor spool and wringer spool 31, 36. The purpose of the end caps is to provide a more finished look to the product, and also a smooth surface which is less likely, at the wringer spool end cap 42, to scratch mop boards, table legs, and the like.

Referring now to FIG. 10, specifics of the anchor spool 31 will be seen. It should be noted that the anchor spool 31 contains a pair of flip flop slots 32, and a pair of fixed head slots 34. The flip flop slots comprise approximately 90 of the arcuate portion, and the fixed head slots 34 are oriented at an approximate perpendicular axis to the center axis of the flip flop slots 32. To be noted also are the stabilizing fins 55 around the exterior of the anchor spool 31 for purposes of securely locking the sponge block 50 when banded by means of the ring 61 to the ends of the sponge block 50.

As illustrated in FIGS. 10, 11, and 12, an undercut S8 is provided to receive the sponge block 50 portion which is securely tightened and handed by means of the tie ring 61. The wringer spool 36 is illustrated in FIGS. 13, 14, and where it will be seen, particularly in FIG. 14, that a snap head collar 37 is provided in the wringer spool 36 to fit in the undercut 45 at the end of the wringer shaft (see FIG..1) adjacent the snap head fastener 43. Interiorly, a plurality of flip flop slots 38 and fixed head slots 39 are provided in the wringer spool 36, just the same as in the anchor spool 31. Also an undercut S9 is provided to receive the wringer spool ring 62, in the same fashion as with the anchor spool 31.

The banding of the ends of the sponge block 50 is shown diagrammatically and sequentially in FIGS. 16 through 18. The end of the sponge block 50 is first squeezed and then (for purposes of illustration the anchor spool portion is shown which is substantially identical to the wringer spool portion) the anchor spool ring 61 is placed in position over the already shrunken end of the sponge block 50. It will be noted that the ring 61 is formed of a thin, band of stainless steel with a welded overlap 68. The first step in banding is to squeeze the ring 61, and form a pair of diametrically opposed dents 63 (see FIG. 17) at a position adjacent the single horizontal stabilizing fin 55. As will be noted particularly in FIG. 17, the dents 63 have their pointed ends resting on auxiliary teeth 69. When the ring 61 is subsequently subjected to further squeezing (see FIG. 18), the formation of the pigtails 67 in offsetting directions as shown in FIG. 18 results. The thus formed pigtails 67 serve additionally to the auxiliary teeth 69 and fins 55, 56 to lock the end of the sponge block 50 as banded by the ring 61 against the anchor spool 31, or the wringer spool 36. It will be further noted that the ring 61 defines a circular locus slightly less than the circular locus of the stabilizing fins 55. As shown in the other section in FIGS. 11 and 14, the band or ring 61, 62 thus serves to tightly tie the end of the sponge block 50 to its associated spool, and the same translates the motion or anchor action of its respective spool 31, 36 to the sponge 50, and yet any unsightly appearance of the slant end of the sponge block 50 is masked by means of the respective end caps 41, 42 and their depending skirts 60. 7

As to the material employed, as indicated above, the cellulose sponge is a regenerated cellulose, preferably having a high content of flax for reinforcing purposes. The reinforcing mesh 40 in a commercial embodiment is a Raschel knit of to cotton made by Southern Mills, Inc., of Atlanta, Ga. The warp yarns are 10/2=-2 warps and 32/2I warp. All are made from good gradefcle an, carded cotton or blendedoffi 'b''r cent with nylon or another polyester to prevent shrinkage, and further increase strength. They are knitted on l8-gage or 36-gage machines, with two needles for each hole in the netting, l6-l8 stitches per inch after dyeing and tentering. The same is thereafter sewn into a sleeve which, after sewing, contains 38 holes around the periphery of the sleeve or between 3 and 4 holes per inch. The sleeve is cut to approximately 46 inches in length with one end closed. Thereafter the sleeve is positioned in a mold and the reinforced cellular sponge block formed generally as described in the Buchkremer US. Pat. No. 2,913,772, owned by applicants assignee. The blocks are then cut off to the particular lengths of sponge block 50 which is to be employed in the molded mop head.

In summary, it will be seen that a mop head 20 has beenshown which can be used on a wringer mop assembly 10 which is susceptible of reciprocating use on all four of the faces, the faces of the mop head 20 (A, B, C, and D) being approximately the same size, weight, and proportion. By reversing the mop head 20 the two faces can be used in reciprocating mopping, which are not used prior to reversal. In addition, a fixed position is provided for those applications where the mop head 20 is to be rigidly secured to the mop assembly 10. Reinforcing material is provided in the sponge block 50, such as a mesh 40, or other open weave material which assists in reducing the tendency of the sponge 50' to tear, or wear during repeated wringings, and washing against roughened surfaces. By molding the sponge 50, rather than sawing the same from a large bun, the exterior surface of the rnop head 20 is chamois-like and preserves a good finish, and yet without any loose cloth on the exterior of the mop head which can become shredded by working on rough surfaces such as painted walls.

Although particular embodiments of the invention have been shown and described in full here, there is no intention to thereby limit the invention to the details of such embodiments. On the contrary, the intention is to cover all modifications, alternatives, embodiments, usages and equivalents of a mop head as fall within the spirit and scope of the invention, specification and the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. For use with a wringer type mop holder, a cellular sponge mop head comprising, in combination,

a molded sponge body,

said body being substantially square in cross section and having four faces of substantially the same configuration,

a wringer spool secured at one end of said sponge member,

an anchor spool secured at the other end of said head whereby the mop head assembly is reinforced against wear on roughened surfaces and at the edges adjacent the four faces to resist tearing in repeated wringing.

3 In the mop head assembly of claim 1,

a pair of opposed head slots on each of said anchor spool and wringer spool for fixing the assembly on the holder.

4. In the mop head assembly of claim 2,

said material comprising an open weaved mesh of synthetic fibrous material.

5. In the mop head assembly of claim 1,

a pair of end caps,

means on said end caps proportioned to snap fittingly engage the respective anchor spool and wringer spool ends.

6. In the mop head assembly of claim 2,

said fabric comprising a knitted fabric and molded substantially coplanar with the exterior skin of said sponge portion.

7. In the mop head assembly of claim 1,

a plurality of stabilizing fins on each of said wringer spool and anchor spool and extending therefrom.

8. In the mop head assembly of claim 7,

tie rings employed to clamp said sponge body at its ends to the respective anchor spool and wringer spool.

9. In the mop head assembly of claim 8,

undercut means on each of said wringer spool and anchor spool to receive the gathered end portion of said sponge body.

10. In the mop head assembly of claim 9,

a pair of end caps proportioned to snap fittingly engage the respective anchor spool and wringer spool to mask the tie rings and finish the ends of the mop head to mask the tied end portions of the sponge body extending beyond the tie rings.

11. In the mop head assembly of claim I,

said body having a length at least twice its width.

12. In the mop head assembly of claim 10,

said body having a length at least twice its width.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2644182 *Aug 26, 1948Jul 7, 1953Philip SiegelCompressing or squeezing device for mops
US3419930 *Apr 6, 1967Jan 7, 1969Vincent GrunertDual action cleaning mop
US3616483 *Apr 13, 1970Nov 2, 1971Moulinex SaTwister type self-wringing mop
US3699603 *Feb 26, 1971Oct 24, 1972Popeil BrothersWringer mop
US3750220 *Feb 26, 1971Aug 7, 1973Popeil BrothersMop head for a wringer type mop holder
BE623878A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3845518 *Aug 8, 1973Nov 5, 1974Popeil BrothersMop head
US5507065 *Dec 10, 1993Apr 16, 1996Mcbride; JohnCleanroom washing system
US5548862 *Sep 22, 1995Aug 27, 1996Curtis; SandraCleaning utensil
US5678278 *Sep 26, 1995Oct 21, 1997Mcbride; JohnCleanroom washing system
US6718591Feb 27, 2002Apr 13, 2004Colleen E. MarshCleaning device
US7127768 *Sep 12, 2003Oct 31, 2006The Clorox CompanyDisposable cleaning head
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/228, 15/244.2, 401/197, 15/120.1, 15/144.1
International ClassificationA47L13/10, A47L13/16, A47L13/20, A47L13/142
Cooperative ClassificationA47L13/20, A47L13/16, A47L13/142
European ClassificationA47L13/16, A47L13/20, A47L13/142