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Publication numberUS3799398 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 26, 1974
Filing dateNov 23, 1971
Priority dateAug 1, 1968
Also published asDE1938551A1, US3635261
Publication numberUS 3799398 A, US 3799398A, US-A-3799398, US3799398 A, US3799398A
InventorsM Maurelli, L Merrien, B Morane, C Paoletti, R Sathicq
Original AssigneeOreal
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for packaging products which are to be stored separately but dispensed simultaneously
US 3799398 A
Abstract
A dispenser for packaging two products which must be stored separately but mixed when dispensed, said dispenser comprising an outer container and an inner container within said outer container, said inner container being provided with closure means which opens in response to a difference between the pressure in said outer container and that in said inner container, and means for creating such a pressure difference.
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United States Patent 1191 Morane et al.

[ Mar. 26, 1974 METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PACKAGING PRODUCTS WHICH ARE TO BE STORED SEPARATELY BUT DISPENSED SIMULTANEOUSLY [75] Inventors: Bruno Morane, Paris; Charles Paoletti, Aulnay S/Bois; Louis Merrien, Fontenay Sous Bois; Manlio Maurelli, Vaujours; Robert Sathicq, Villepime, all of France [73} Assignee: L'Oreal, Paris, France [22} Filed: Nov. 23, 1971 [21] Appi. No.: 201,412

Related US. Application Data [62] Division of Ser. No 844,8. July 25, 1969.

[S2] U.S. CL. 222/39, 222/94 [fill Int. Cl 4. 367d 5/56 [58] Field of Search i. 222/94 399, 3865, 95,

[56} References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,518.2) 5/]97] Szahu 222/399 3 l78.()75 4/1965 Ricdl et a1. 222/3865 2388.058 7/1937 Hensler l Hill 12 X 3.491.833 9/1968 Hanson. Jr 222/136 Primary ExaminerStanley H Toilberg Attorney, Agenl, ur FirmBrisebois 81 Kruger {57] ABSTRACT A dispenser for packaging two products which must be stored separately but mixed when dispensed. said dispenser comprising an outer container and an inner container within said outer container, said inner c0ntainer being provided with closure means which opens in response to a difference between the pressure in said outer container and that in said inner container. and means for creating such a pressure difference 4 Claims, l5 Drawing Figures SHEET 1 BF 7 PAHENTEBmzs m4 PMENIEB M826 1974 SHEET 2 1F 7 PMENIED M826 1874 SHEEI 3 BF 7 Kfl mm mm %m MENIEB "826 I974 SHEET 5 UF 7 METHOD AND AiPARATUS FOR FACKAGING PRODUCTS WHICH ARE TO BE STORED SEPARATELY BUT DISPENSED SIMULTANEOUSLY This is a division, of application Ser. No. 844,8, filed July 25, i969.

in packaging cosmetics, or pharmaceuticals, or products used for maintenance purposes, it is often necessary to store two products simultaneously when one of these products reacts with the other when they are brought into contact. it is obvious that such contact must be avoided during storage in order to prevent the premature occurrence of the reaction which must take place at the moment of use. The two products are consequently often packaged in separate containers, but this requires the user to handle two containers at once when the products therein are being dispensed.

The object of the present invention is to provide a method of packaging and dispensing under pressure at least two products which are to be used simultaneously, but which must be stored separately, and a container for use in carrying out that method.

The invention is essentially characterized by the fact that at least one of the products to be dispensed is en closed in an outer jacket provided with at least one clo sure valve. inside this jacket is at least one container holding at least one other product to be dispensed simultaneously with the first. The containers are, during storage, subjected to the same internal pressure as the outer jacket. At the moment of use a high enough pressure is created within the container or containers to rupture it, and project its contents into the remaining space within the jacket. The products brought into contact in this manner are mixed by shaking the jacket and the mixture is dispensed through the vaive in response to the internal pressure prevailing in the jacket.

in a first embodiment of the invention the outer jacket and the container or containers are initially filled at atmospheric pressure, and the higher pressure required to rupture the container or containers is produced by means of a cartridge of pressurizing fluid which is injected into one of the containers through a connecting valve. The cartridge of pressurizing fluid may be independent of the jacket and the containers and may be put into operation by the user just before the mixture is to be used.

In an alternative embodiment the cartridge of pressurizing fluid may also be enclosed inside the jacket and it is then placed in operation by connecting it to the container or containers by means of a perforating device.

In the first embodiment, the jacket which contains the complete mixture is pressurized just before use by the same pressurizing fluid which ruptured the container or containers.

In a second embodiment of the invention, at least one of the products to be dispensed is inserted in an outer jacket which is closed by a valve. A container having an outer diameter equal to the inner diameter of said jacket is then placed within the jacket. This container holds one of the products to be dispensed and is closed at its top by means of a removable plug or a rupturabie diaphragm. Its bottom is in the form of a movable pis ton which is slidable within the container. At the moment of use sufficient pressure is exerted on the lower surface of the movable piston to cause upward displacement of the piston and thereby open the upper part of the container and project its contents into the jacket. This force also drives the container toward the top of the outer jacket once the piston has reached its upper position. The mixture is finally dispensed through the valve of the jacket as a consequence of the pressure applied thereto by the container when said container has been forced into its upper position by the pressure acting against the lower surface of the piston.

in a third embodiment of the invention, the outer jacket and the container or containers are each filled, not only with the products which are to be simultaneously distributed, but also with the pressurizing fluid. This is done at a temperature below, or at most equal to that at which the pressurizing fluid has a vapor pressure equal to atmospheric pressure. The container or containers is placed in the jacket, and the jacket closed, at the same temperature. The container or containers is ruptured by the partial release of the pressure in the jacket, which causes the pressure inside the container or ccontainers to become higher than that in the jacket outside the containers. The resulting mixture is dispensed, after shaking the jacket, in response to the pressure generated by the pressure fluid initially enclosed within the container or containers.

It is a further object of the invention to provide, as a new article of manufacture, a dispenser adapted to dispense simultaneously under pressure at least two products which must be stored separately, essentially characterized by the fact that it comprises an outer jacket provided with a valved closure and at least one container inside this jacket, said container comprising a weakened zone, and possibly being connected to a valve opening outside the jacket, or adjacent to a space containing a pressurized fluid. Said space may be placed in communication with the container or containers by means of a perforating device.

in the first embodiment of the invention the container or containers are connected to at least one valve opening outside the container and adapted to be placed in communication with the cartridge or pressurizing fluid, or adjacent at least one zone adapted to be perforated by at least one perforating device so as to connect the container to the space containing the pressurized fluid which is located inside the outer jacket of the dispenser according to the invention.

in the first case the device is operated by discharging at least one cartridge of pressurizing fluid through the valve, into the container or containers. In the second case the wall separating the container or containers from the space containing the pressurizing fluid is perforated. The release of the mixture from the device ac cording to the invention may take place through a valve other than the one which has caused the rupture of the container or containers, when there is such a valve, or

through the same valve.

In the second embodiment of the invention the device is essentially characterized by the fact that it comprises an outer jacket closed by a valve and a container which is slidable inside this jacket. The inner container comprises near its upper end a removable plug or a rupturable diaphragm, and at its lower end a movable piston which acts as its bottom and is slidable within the container more freely than the container is slidable within the jacket. The assembly of the container and the piston is positioned above a chamber containing a compressed gas which may or may not be liquefied. This chamber may be opened by a pin or the like to permit the compressed gas to come into contact with the movable piston.

In the device which has just been described the abovementioned container may enclose a second container which may be slidable therein. The second container may have a movable piston which acts as its bottom and a weakened zone at its top and may act as the movable bottom of the first container. In this case the jacket initially contains a first product, the first con tainer contains a second product, and the second container contains a third product.

It is clear that the present invention also includes a device in which the outer jacket encloses a container within which a plurality of slidable containers are mounted. The last container, that is to say the one which is inside all the others, has as its bottom a movable piston of the device.

In the case of the second embodiment of the invention, when the user perforates the chamber containing the compressed gas with a pin, the piston moves up wardly under the pressure exerted by the compressed gas and compresses the product within the container. This forces the plug out of its seat or ruptures the diaphragm so as to permit the product within the container to move into the outer jacket, which initially contains another product. The two products are thus mixed together and, when the piston arrives at its upper position within its container, the compressed gas drives this container toward the top of the jacket, thus causing the container to slide in the jacket, and pressurizing the mixture of fluids in the outerjacket. The user may then, by pressing the valve on the jacket, dispense the desired mixture.

It is obvious that, in order for the operation to proceed as above described, it is absolutely necessary that the frictional resistance to the sliding of the piston in the container, added to the force necessary to eject the plug or rupture the diaphragm must be less than the frictional resistance to sliding of the container in the outer jacket. In like manner this latter force must be less than the force produced by the action of the compressed gas on the movable piston. When there are several inner containers, analogous relationships with respect to the frictional resistance and dimensions of the components must be respected. [n all cases the exact calculation of the frictional conditions and dimensions of the various components manner can be made in a conventional by the technician who designs the particular container, in which several inequalities must be respected in order to insure satisfactory operation of the device. These calculations will not be discussed in detail, since they are within the scope of a man skilled in the art. For the gaseous propellants currently used and for a jacket holding a single container provided with a thin wall, an essential condition for good operation is that the volume of air above the product in the outer jacket must be at least percent greater than the volume of the product within the inner container.

The movable plugs in the slidable containers may be made of a flexible material. The openings in which they are placed may have dimensions slightly greater than those of the support for the valve on the jacket. The shape of the upper part of the movable piston may be complementary to the shape of the valve of the jacket in order to leave a minimum dead space at the end of the path of travel of the movable piston. The shape of the lower part of the movable piston may be complementary to that of the upper wall of the chamber containing the compressed gaseous propellant. In general the free volume within the outer jacket above the product which it contains is occupied by air under atmospheric pressure, but some degree of vacuum may also be used.

In the third embodiment of the invention the containers are neither connected to a valve or adjacent to any perforatable wall, and the device according to the in vention comprises only one valve, to wit, the one through which the desired mixture is dispensed. In this case, so that the user may easily determine the time at which the inner container or containers is opened, the valve is provided with an optical or acoustic attachment which indicates when the pressure in the outer jacket has been sufficiently reduced to cause rupture of the inner container or containers.

In all of the embodiments of the invention the containers may be made either of a rigid material provided with a weakened frangible zone, or of a flexible material having for example, a weakened seam, or even a semi-rigid material closed by a pressure seal which can resist only a small internal pressure, or by a force fitted stopper. In particular, the containers may be made of a plastic material.

The gaseous propellant may consist of a mixture of butane and propane, or a mixture of Freon ll and Freon 12, or of any other pressurizng gases conventionally used at a relative pressure preferably less than 6 kg/cm In order that the invention may be more clearly un derstood, several embodiments thereof will now be described, purely by way of illustration, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a sectional view through a dispenser accord ing to the invention which comprises a rigid container having a circular frangible zone near its lower end. This device is adapted to be put into use by means of an external cartridge of pressurizing fluid and the container is connected at its upper end to the dispensing valve.

FIG. 2 shows, in axial section, a dispenser according to the invention comprising a dispensing valve at its lower end, a rigid container provided with a circular frangible line, and being operated by means of a cartridge of pressure fluid outside the dispenser.

FIG. 3 shows, in axial section, a dispenser according to the invention enclosing a container of flexible plastic material provided with a weak seam at its bottom, and comprising a cartridge of pressure fluid attached thereto through which the desired mixture is dispensed.

FIG. 4 shows, in axial section, a dispenser according to the invention comprising a dispensing valve and a rigid container having a circular frangible area near its upper end and connected at its lower end to a cartridge of pressurizing fluid by a valve. The device is designed to operate with the dispensing valve down.

FIGS. 5, 6 and 7 represent an embodiment of the invention in which the dispenser comprises an inner container in the form of a metallic tube closed by a folded over joint. This dispenser comprises near its bottom a volume of pressurizing fluid which may be placed in communication with the container by means of a perforating pin operated from outside.

FIG. 8 shows, in partial axial section, a dispenser according to the invention of the same general type shown in FIGS. 5, 6 and 7, but in which the perforating pin is made in a different manner.

FIG. 9 shows in axial section a dispenser according to the invention in which the container is not connected to any valve and is not contacted by any perfo rating pin, but is internally subjected to the same pressure as the external jacket.

FIGS. and I] show indicators which may be used in combination with the device of FIG. 9.

FIG. 12 shows in section a device according to the invention which encloses a sliding container, the assembly being shown in storage position.

FIG. 13 shows the device illustrated in FlG. 1 when the user has just perforated the chamber containing the compressed gas in order to mix the two fluids together.

FIG. 14 shows the device illustrated in FIG. 2 when the compressed gas has slid the container inside the jacket.

H6. shows in storage position a device according to the invention in which the outer jacket encloses two containers, one within the other.

Referring now particularly to FIG. 1, it will be seen that reference numeral 1 designates the outer jacket of the dispenser according to the invention. This outer jacket is generally cylindrical in form and is made of any suitable material as is in general the case with conventional aerosol dispensers. [t is closed at its top by a valve 2, the bottom of which is connected to a container 3. The container is a tube of rigid polyethylene material about 0.5 mm thick. This tube has near its lower end a thinner zone 4, the thickness of which is about 0.2 mm. The outer jacket 1 contains a liquid 5 which occupies only part of its volume. The container 3 is filled with a liquid 6. During manufacture, neither the container 3 nor the jacket 1 is pressurized.

A cartridge of pressurizing fluid 8 is used when the liquids are to be mixed. This fluid may be, for example, a gas under pressure such as compressed air, nitrogen or Freon. This cartridge 7 is closed by a valve 9 provideed with a mouthpiece 10. The user inserts the mouthpiece 10in the seat of the top of the valve 2 and exerts sufficient pressure on the cartridge 7 to open the valve 9. The fluid pressurizer then applies its pressure to the fluid 6 in the container 3, which ruptures the weakened zone 4 and consequently causes the fluid 6 to flow into the fluid 5. When the cartridge 7 reaches the same pressure as the fluid contained in the device, the user ceases to press on the cartridge 7 and disconnects it. The cartridge is replaced by a push-button dispenser and the device is shaken to insure a homogenous mixture of the fluids 5 and 6. It then suffices for the user to press the push-button which actuates the valve 2, the reservoir being so positioned that the valve is at its upper end, so that under pressure from the fluid 8 inside the jacket 1, the mixture of fluids 5 and 6 is dispensed, with the container 3 acting as a plunging tube.

In the embodiment shown in FIG. 2, reference numeral 1 indicates the outer jacket of the dispenser according to the invention, which is provided with a valve 2, to which the container 3 is attached. This container 3 and its weakened zone 4a are made in the same way as in the embodiment of FIG. 1. The container holds a liquid 6 and the jacket holds a liquid 5, and both are filled at atmospheric pressure.

When the user wishes to employ such a dispenser, he uses a cartridge 7 of pressurizing fluid 8 provided with a valve 9 having a tip 10 and discharges the pressurizing fluid 8 into the container 3 through the valves 9 and 2, as has been hereinbefore indicated. This pressure, which may be about 5 kg/cm for example, ruptures the tube constituting the container 3 along its weakened zone 4a and the liquid 6 mixes with the liquid 5. The dispenser is then shaken to insure homogenization of the mixture, and the cartridge 7 is removed and replaced by a dispensing valve actuated by a pushbutton. The mixture is dispensed by pressing on the push-button, the valve 2 being positioned at the lower end of the dispenser according to the invention. The mixture is ejected as before by reason of the pressure produced inside the jacket by the pressurizing fluid 8 which, after rupturing the container 3, is released into the jacket I.

In a third embodiment shown in FIG. 3, reference numeral 1 indicates the outer jacket of the dispenser according to the invention, equipped at its upper end with a valve 2 to which a container 3 inside the jacket 1 is connected. The container 3 is a bag of flexible plastic material which is closed at its lower end by a heat seal 4b. The container 3 is filled with a liquid 6, whereas the jacket 1 contains a liquid 5, both under atmospheric pressure. An intermediate member 11 at the top of the jacket 1 covers the upper conical part of the jacket I but is provided with a central opening affording free access to the valve 2. The wall of this opening, is provided with threads 12 having a large pitch, which threads cooperate with a rib 13 at the lower end of a cartridge 7 containing a pressurizing fluid 8 under a pressure of 5 lag/cm. The cartridge 7 carries at the center of its bottom 14, a valve 15 provided with a pin 16. The top of the cartridge carries a valve 17 which cooperates with a push-button 18 the actuation of which dispenses the mixture. inside the valve 17 is a tube 19 which extends down to the bottom 14.

When this dispenser is to be used, the cartridge 7 is rotated. As a consequence of the cooperation between the rib l3 and the helical threads 12 the bottom 14 is thus moved toward the valve 2. The pin 16 of the valve then enters the seat provided therefore in the valve 2, thus bringing the inside of the cartridge 7 into communication with that of the container 3. The pressure exerted by the pressurizing fluid 8 then breaks the seal 41: of the container 3, which causes the liquid 6 to flow into the liquid 5. The pressurizing fluid 8 follows it and ensures the pressurization of the entire volume within the jacket. Pressure on the push-button 18 then produces a partial vacuum in the cartridge 7, which draws the mixture of the liquids 5 and 6 up into the cartridge for distribution through the tube 19 and valve 17.

in the embodiment which has just been described, the pushbutton 18 is positioned for use at the top of the dispenser and the mixture is dispensed without having to remove the cartridge 7 of pressurizing fluid.

in the embodiment of FIG. 4, reference numeral 1 still indicates the outer envelope of the dispenser accord'mg to the invention which carries at its upper end a valve 2 which may be actuated by a dispensing pushbutton 20.

The jacket 1 is provided at the center of its bottom 21 with an internally threaded sleeve connecting the inside of this jacket to the outer air. A container 3 having at one end a threaded neck 3a is fastened inside the jacket by screwing this neck all the way into the sleeve 22 so as to hermetically seal the jacket 1. The dispenser comprises a valve 23 in the neck 3a. The container 3 comprises a weakened zone 4 near the end remote from said valve. The container 3 and zone 4 are of the same material and dimensions as in the embodiment of FIG. 1. The container 3 contains a liquid 6 and the jacket a liquid 5. Neither is filled under pressure.

When the embodiment of FIG. 4 is to be used, the pin 10 of the valve 9 of the cartridge 7 is introduced into the valve 23. The cartridge 7 contains a pressurizing fluid 8 under a pressure of about kg/cm. When a force is exerted sufficient to enable the pin 10 to open the valves 9 and 23, the pressure of the fluid 8 ruptures the container 3 and drives the fluid 6 out of the container. When the cartridge 7 and the inside of the jacket 1 attain the same pressure, the cartridge 7 is removed and the dispenser, which has been pressurized by the fluid 8, is shaken. After homogenization in this manner, pressure the valve 2 through its bush-button which are positioned at the bottom of the jacket, pressure dispenses the mixture of liquids 5 and 6.

In another emboidment, shown in FIGS. 5, 6 and 7,

the need for a separate cartridge of pressurizing fluid is eliminated. In these figures, reference numeral 1 indicates the outer jacket of the dispenser according to the invention provided at its upper end with a dispensing valve actuated by a pushbutton 24. The jacket 1 is closed at its lower end by a double bottom, the outer wall of which is indicated by reference numeral 25, and its inner wall by 26. The walls and 26 define a cartridge which will contain a pressurizing fluid 8. The wall 25 separates this psace from the outside and carries a central sleeve 27 made in two parts. One of these, outside the jacket 1, is provided with an internally threaded seat 28, while the other, indicated by reference numeral 29 comprises a central cylindrical recess. The sleeve 27 is fastened to the bottom 25. The wall 26 separates the space which will hold the fluid 8 from the remainder of the space inside the jacket I. This wall carries, inside the space which is to receive the fluid 8, an internally threaded sleeve 30. The threaded recess in this sleeve is closed at its lower end, that is to say, adjacent the space containing the fluid 8 by a plug 31 molded at the time the sleeve is manufactured. Inside the jacket 1 is a container 3 in the form of an aluminum tube, closed at one end by an externally threaded neck 32 and a sealing web 33, and closed at the other end by a fold in the aluminum, indicated by reference numeral 34. The container 3 holds a liquid 6 and is fastened to the inside of the jacket by screwing its threaded neck 32 into the sleeve 30. The sleeve 27 is adapted to receive a perforating device identified by reference numeral 35. The device 35 comprises a push-button 36, threads 37 adapted to cooperate with the threads in the seat 28 of sleeve 27 and a punch 38 having a diameter substantially equal to that of the cylindrical recess in the part 29 of the sleeve 27. The punch 38 is provided with a longitudinally extending groove 39. The walls 25 and 26 are attached to the lateral wall of the jacket 1 by a double seal 40.

When manufacturing such a dispenser, the tube which forms the container 3 is first filled from the bottom with the liquid 6 and this tube is positioned in the jacket 1 by screwing its neck 32 into the sleeve 30. This jacket is then filled with the liquid 5 and closed at its upper end by means of the dispensing valve provided with the pushbutton 24. The perforating device is then mounted in the sleeve 27, engaging the punch 38 in the cylindrical recess of the part 29 of the sleeve 27. This position is shown in FIG. 5.

The pressurizing fluid 8 is then introduced under pressure into the space between the walls 25 and 26. This fluid passes through the threaded seal 28 and the groove 39 in the punch 38. When the double bottom is filled with fluid 8, the threaded part 37 is inserted into the seat 28 by pressing on the button 36. This is made possible by the fact that the sleeve 27 and the threaded part 37 are made of a relatively elastic plastic material. At this moment, the space between the walls 25 and 26 is closed.

When the dispenser is to be used, the button 36 is turned to screw the perforating device 35 in and thus cause axial displacement of the punch 38 in the direction of the plug 31 and the web 33. This position is shown on FIG. 6. At the end of the screwing, the punch has perforated the members 31 and 33, thus connecting through the groove 39 in the punch, the space containing the pressurizing fluid 8 and the inside of the container 3. When subjected to this pressure the fold 34 unrolls, the upper end of the tube opens, and the liquid 6 therein is projected into the liquid 5. The dispenser is then shaken to insure homogenization of the mixture and it suffices to turn the dispenser so that the pushbutton is downward and press thereon. The mixture is then dispensed in response to the pressure of the fluid 8 inside the jacket.

FIG. 8 shows another embodiment of the device shown in FIGS. 5-7. This figure shows the jacket 1 of the dispenser provided at its upper end with a valve and associated push-button 24. The jacket 1 contains a liquid 5 and encloses a container 3 holding the liquid 6. The container 3 is a tube of the type described in connection with the embodiment of FIGS. 5-7. It is also screwed by its neck into a sleeve 30, and is provided with a closure web 33. The sleeve 30 is blocked by a plug 31. The perforating device comprises a punch 38, which slides snugly in a sleeve 41, without threads, the space containing the pressurizing fluid is enclosed by a cylinder having the sleeve 30 at its upper end and the sleeve 41 at its lower end. The perforating device 35 slides in the sleeve 41. The wall 26 defining this space is attached at its lower side to the bottom 42 of the dispenser by a seal 43 and the bottom 42 is similarly sealed to the lateral wall of the jacket 1 at 44. This arrangement makes it possible to avoid the double seal 40 shown on FIGS. 57.

This embodiment of the invention is filled and operated in the same way as the one illustrated in FIGS. 5-7.

FIG. 9 shows yet another embodiment of the device according to the invention. In this figure reference numberal l indicates the cylindrical outer jacekt carrying at its upper end a dispensing valve 2. The jacket 1 encloses a container 3 which is attached to the bottom of the jacket in any suitable manner, for example by a blind sleeve 45. The container 3 is a tube of aluminum foil, the threaded neck of which is screwed into the sleeve 45, and the other end of which is closed by a fold 34. The jacket contains a liquid and the tube 3 contains a fluid 6. During its manufacture, the tube 3 is filled with the fluid 6, and before closing the fold in this tube, liquid Freon 12 is inserted therein. [t is clear that the tube must be filled at a temperature below that at which Freon 12 becomes liquid, for example, l5C. At this same temperature the tube 3 is placed in the jacket I, and the jacket partially filled with the fluid 5 and a certain amount of liquid Freon 12 is then introduced into the jacket. The jacket 1 is then closed by mounting the valve 2 thereon and the dispenser is permitted to return to room temperature. The pressures inside and outside the tube 3 are the same, since they are both equal to the vapor pressure of Freon 12 at the temperature of the dispenser as a whole.

When this device is to be used, the valve 2 is opened by pressing on push-button 2, which depressurizes the jacket 1, by permitting the Freon which it contains to escape. The pressure surrounding the tube 3 is thus diminished while the pressure therein remains the same. This causes the fold which closes one end of the tube to unroll, opening the tube so that its contents are propelled by the Freon 12 into the jacket 1. As soon as the user hears the tube explode, he releases the pressure on the valve 2, shakes the dispenser, turns it over to position the valve 2 at the bottom thereof, and again presses on the push-button to open the valve 2, thus dispensing a mixture of the fluids S and 6. These fluids are propelled by the pressure inside the jacket 1 produced by the Freon which was initially contained in the tube 3 and any of the Freon originally contained by the jacket 1 which did not escape when the valve was first pressed.

it is obvious that, in this last embodiment, the container 3 need not necessarily be fastened to the inside of the jacket 1. It is also clear that, if the noise made when the tube opens up is not loud enough to attract the attention of the user, acoustical or optical signalling means may be added to the device according to the invention to indicate to the user that the container 3 has been ruptured. Such arrangements are shown on FIGS. 9, l0 and 11.

In FIG. 9 the outlet is provided with a flexible tube 46. This tube stays curved so long as Freon is escaping through the outlet, but straightens up into the position shown in broken lines when a liquid mixture passes through the outlet. The straightening of the tube 46 indicates to the user that the container 3 has ruptured so that a more or less emulsified liquid product will thereafter be propelled from the dispenser.

in FIG. 10 the outlet is provided with a removable cylindrical device 47 comprising a piston 48 pierced by holes 49, the piston rod being provided with a longitudinal groove 50. The cylinder 47 is seated in the dispensing nozzle and the piston 48 is a tight sliding lit inside it. The lower part of the piston rod is colored red, for example. When the user opens the valve 2 of the de vice to release the gas in the jacket 1, the gas escapes through the holes 49 in the piston 48 and through the groove 50 in the piston rod without difiiculty and without moving the piston. On the contrary, when the tube 3 has ruptured, a more or less emulsified liquid product strikes the piston 48 and its viscosity is too great to permit it to pass through the holes 49, so that it pushes the piston to the outer end of its path of travel. The piston rod 50 comes all the way out of the device 47, so that the user can see the red thereon, which indicates that the first phase of the operation is over. The user then removes the device 47 and replaces it with a pushbutton which is used for normal dispensing as hereinafter described.

In the embodiment of H6. 1 l, a nozzle 51 comprising a channel portion 52 is attached to the outlet of the valve 2. This channel portion is covered by a vibrating blade 53 attached to the end of the channel remote from the valve 2. In use, when the gas is being released from the jacket, the blade 53 produces a sound caused by the passage of gas. On the contrary, after rupture of the tube 3, a more or less emulsified mixture reaches the channel 52, the sound is no longer produced. The dispenser is then shaken to assure homogenization of the mixture, and when it is turned over, and the valve 2 opened. the mixture to be dispensed will escape through the channel 52, by pushing away the blade 53.

FIGS. 12-14 show yet another embodiment of the invention. In this embodiment reference numeral 1 indicates the outer jacket of the device according to the invention and reference numeral 54 indicates the dispensing valve which is pressed down to deliver the desired mixture. The jacket 1 contains at its lower end a chamber 55 and a needle 56. The chamber 55 contains butane at a pressure of 1.7 ltgicrn at 20C. The needle has a screw-threaded segment by means of which it may be actually moved into contact with the upper wall of the chamber 55. Above the chamber 55 is a container 57 having an outer diameter equal to the inner diameter of the jacket 2. The container 57 may slide inside the jacket 1. It carries at its top a conical portion and is closed by a flexible stopper 58. The bottom of the container 57 consists of a movable piston 59 which is slidable within the container 57 and which bears against the conical part of the container 57 when in its upper position. The jacket 1 contains 40 cm of a product 59a and the container 57 contains 40 cm 3 of a product 60. These two products have a density of about 1.

in order to provide the inequalities necessary for proper mechanical operation the diameter of the envelope 1 is 5.2 cm and its total height is 15 cm. The diameter of the plug 58 is 2.6 cm. The volume of air initially contained between piston 59 in its lower position and the upper wall 55 is negligible because of their complemental-y shapes. The container 57 is completely filled with 40 cm of the product which it contains. The fric tional resistance of the container 57 in the jacket 1 is 10 kg; that of the piston 59 and the container 57 is 5 kg; and the force required to eject the plug 58 is 2 kg.

When the user desires to employ the device according to the invention he screws in the pin 56 so as to perforate the upper wall of the chamber 55. The pressure of the butane is exerted on the lower surface of the piston 59 which transmits this pressure to the fluid 60 which forces out the plug 58. The piston 59 slides inside the container 57 until it reaches its upper position, which position is shown in FIG. 2. At this moment the fluid 60 and 59a are mixed inside the jacket 1 and outside the container 57. The pressure of the butane forces the assembly comprising the container 57 and piston 59 in its upper position upwardly within the outer jacket until the mixture 59:1-60 is compressed to a pressure equal to that developed by the pressurizing gas in the jacket 55 and approximating the frictional resistance. It then suffices for the user to press on the button which controls the valve 57 in order to dispense the mixture 590-60 under the pressure generated by the pressurizing gas.

FIG. represents a variation of the embodiment of the device shown in FIGS. 12-14.

It will be seen that, in this case, the jacket 1 has the general characteristics shown on FIGS. 12-14. It comprises a valve 54, a chamber 55 at its lower part, and a pin 56 adjacent said chamber. The jacket 1 holds a container 61, analogous to the container 57, and closed by a plug 62. Inside the container 61 is a second container 63 closed by a plug 64 at its top. The container 63 has a shape analogous to that of the container 61 and is slidable within the container 61. The plug 64 has a diameter less than the diameter of the plug 62. The container 63 is closed at its lower end by a movable piston 65 which is slidable therein. The piston 65 comprises a conical portion adapted to bear on the conical zone at the top of the container 63. The container 63 holds a fluid 66, the container 61 holds a fluid 67, and the outer jacket may hold a fluid 68. The container 63 and 61 are completely filled by the fluids 66 and 67, while a dead space filled with air is positioned within the jacket 1 above the fluid 68. In such a device, when the user actuates the pin 56, the pressurizing gas in the chamber 55 is brought into contact with the lower surface of the piston 65 and causes compression of the fluid 66, thus forcing out the plug 64. This results in compression of the fluid 67, which forces out the plug 62, thus causing ejection of the fluids 66-67 into the jacket 1 and the resulting mixture of the fluid 66, 67 and 68. All of these operations take place while the piston 65 is being moved to its upper position within the container 63 thereby driving the container 63 into its upper position within the container 61. Once the mixture has been formed in this manner, the assembly comprising the piston 65 and the containers 63 and 61 moves toward the upper part of the jacket 1 and places the mixture 66, 67 and 68 under pressure. The user may then dispense this mixture by pressing on the pushbutton of the valve 54.

Several examples of products which may be packaged in the dispenser according to the invention will now be given.

Example 1: Regenerative hair lotion Any of the dispensers shown in FIGS. l-9 may be used.

The following products are placed in the inner container:

Methoxymethyl dicyandiamide 0.4 g

Triethanolamine-para-hydroxy-benzoate 0.02 g

Water, q.s.p. cm

20 cm of an aqueous, lactic acid solution having a pH of 2 is placed in the outer jacket.

The dispenser is operated as hereinbefore described to mix the two liquids and applied to very degraded bleached hair before setting it. After drying the hair appears clean and shiny, has excellent body, and the wave imparted by the "set" lasts very well.

Examples 2: Regenerative hair lotion Any one of the dispensers shown in FIGS. 1-9 may be used.

0.4 g of hydroxymethyldicyandiamide is placed in the inner container.

. The following solution is placed in the outer acket:

trimethyl-cetyl ammonium bromide 0.02 g citric acid q.s.p. pH=4 water q.s.p. 20 cm The dispenser is operated as hereinbefore described to mix the two liquids and apply them to bleached very degraded hair, before setting the hair. After drying, the hair has a clean, shiny appearance, has excellent body, and the set lasts longer.

Example 3: Bleaching mixture Any of the dispensers shown in FIGS. l-9 may be used.

The following products are placed in the inner container:

potassium persulfate 27 g biammonium phosphate 5 g sodium carbonate 6 g disodium salt of ethylene-diamine-tetraacetic acid sodium laurylsulfate 7.5 g

precipitated silica 3.5 g

100 cc of hydrogen peroxide at 20 volume is placed in the outer jacket.

The dispenser is operated as previously described to mix the two products and apply the mixture to the hair. The hair becomes four or five shades lighter. Example 4: Oxidation dye for the hair Any one of the dispensers shown in FIGS. l-9 may be used:

40 cc of the following mixture is placed in the inner container:

nonylphenol condensed with 4 moles of ethylene oxide 23 g nonylphenol condensed with 9 moles of ethylene oxide 25 g copra diethanolamide 6 g butylglycol 2 g propylene glycol l6 g 20 percent ammonial2 ml paratoluylene diamine 0.9 g

para-aminophenol 0.9 g

m.diamino-anis0l sulfate 0.06 g

m.aminophenol 0.2 g

resorcine 0.5 g

nitroparaphenylene diamine 0.002 g hydroquinone 0.10 g

sodium salt of diethylene-triamino-penta acetic acid sodium bisulfite 1.2 ml

water q.s.p. lOO g 40 cc of hydrogen peroxide at 20 volumes is placed in the outer jacket.

The dispenser is operated as hereinbefore described to mix the two liquids which are then applied to percent white hair. A chestnut shade results.

Example 5: Product for coloring the skin Any of the dispensers shown in FIGS. 1-9 may be used.

The following mixture is placed in the inner container:

3-paranitrophenyl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium chloride ethanol, q.s.p. 50

water, q.s.p. g

The following mixture is placed in the outer jacket:

1,2,4-trihydroxy naphthalene 0.34 g

ethanol q.s.p. 50

citric acid and sodium carbonate q.s.p. pH=6 The dispenser is operated as hereinbefore described to mix the two products. The mixture dispensed is applied to the skin and produces a natrual golden tan. Example 6: Permanent for the hair The device according to the invention makes it possible to use in a permanent waving liquid certain reducing agents which impart great softness to the hair facilitate its combing. and permit it to be beautifully waved without deterioration, but which have the disadvantage that they hydrolyze in an aqueous solution.

Any one of the dispensers shown in FIGS. 1-9 may be used.

The following mixture is placed in the inner container:

glycerol thioglycolate 15.2 g

glycerine 1 g The following mixture is placed in the outer jacket:

triethanolamine 4 cm water 56 cm The dispenser is operated as previously described to mix the two liquids. The solution is applied to the hair on curlers in a conventional permanent waving process. After treatment the hair is very soft and has a beautiful wave.

Example 7: Fixative for permanent wave Any of the dispensers according to the invention may also be used as a package for products to be stored in the dry state and which polymerize in solution. This is particularly true of certain methylol compounds which, when applied to the hair, reticulate and polymerize inside the fiber and considerably improve the condition of the hair. These products are valuable as additives to fixatives for permanent waves. The dispenser according to the invention makes it possible to avoid premature polymerization.

2 g of hydroxymethylurea are placed in the inner container.

The following mixture is placed in the outer jacket:

hydrogen peroxide at 30 volumes 3 cm phosphoric acid q.s.p. pH=2.8

water q.s.p. l5 cm The dispenser is operated as hereinbefore described to mix the two products. The resulting mixture is applied to hair wound up on rollers, which hair has been subjected to the reducing step of a permanent wave and then rinsed. After minutes, the hair is removed from the rollers, rinsed and set. The condition of the hair is substantially improved.

14 Example 8: Depilatory The dispenser according to the invention makes it possible to store certain enzymes which deteroriate rapidly in solution. These dispensers may be used to store proteolytic enzymes which, when they hydrolize, increase the effectiveness of the thiols in a depilatory as reducing agents.

The inner container of the dispenser holds the enzyme and the outer jacket contains a conventional depiiatory.

Example 9: Pharmaceutical product obtained from a lyophilized powder [t is well known that certain biological products may be stabilized by lyophilization when these mixtures are fragile, and thereby kept in powdered form until they are placed in solution at the moment of use. This is particularly the case with antiseptic solutions having an antibiotic base. A lyophilized antibiotic powder can be placed in the inner container of the dispenser according to the invention and the aqueous phase in which it is to be dissolved in the outer jacket.

What is claimed is:

l. A dispenser for packaging two products which must be stored separately but mixed when dispensed, said dispenser comprising an outer container, with each container holding under greater than atmospheric pressure a product substantially absent from the other container, said inner container being provided with closure means which opens to permit mixing of said products in response to a difference between the pressure in said outer container and that in said inner container, and means for releasing the pressure in one of said contain ers to create such a pressure difference by changing the quantity of a third product under pressure within one of said containers.

2. A dispenser as claimed in claim 1 in which said pressure reiieving means is a valve in the wall of said outer container.

3. A dispenser as claimed in claim 2 in which said valve is the dispensing outlet for said dispenser and equipped with a signal adapted to indicate whether a gas or liquid is passing through said valve.

4. A dispenser as claimed in claim 1 in which said inner container is a tube made of flexible material provided with a folded over end which unrolls when the pressure in said tube is greater than that outside said tube.

l '0 i l UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,799,39 Dated 26 March 197" BRUNO MORANE, CHARLES PAOLETTI, LOUIS MERRIEN, Inventofls) MANLIO MAURELLI and ROBERT SATHICQ It is certified that error appears in the aboveidentified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data August 1, 1968 France..........P.V. 161,336

December 5, 1968 France. P.V. 176,871

Signed and sealed this 18th day of March 1.975.

( s EAL Attest c MARSHALL DANN RUTF. C. MASON Comissioner of Patents Attesting Officer and Trademarks

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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/39, 222/94
International ClassificationB65D83/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65B31/003, B65D83/42, B65D83/752, B65D83/687, B65B29/10, B65D83/425, B65D83/64, B65B2230/02
European ClassificationB65D83/68B2, B65D83/64, B65D83/42, B65D83/42B, B65B29/10, B65B31/00A, B65D83/752