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Publication numberUS3799404 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 26, 1974
Filing dateJun 20, 1972
Priority dateJun 29, 1971
Also published asDE2231497A1, DE2231497B2, DE2231497C3
Publication numberUS 3799404 A, US 3799404A, US-A-3799404, US3799404 A, US3799404A
InventorsTaupin A
Original AssigneeTransitube Plan De Campagne So
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Devices for feeding particulate products such as powdered or granular materials from a container
US 3799404 A
Abstract
This invention relates to devices for feeding particulate products such as powdered or granular materials from a container, and the object of the invention is to prevent or minimize any tendency for the product to become packed to form bridges that considerably hamper their removal. In the invention, at least one part of the container is mounted for rotation on a smooth surface of a fixed pedestal. This pedestal has a discharge vessel for the product extending substantially diametrically to the container. Conveniently this discharge channel is trough-shaped.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Taupin Mar. 26, 1974 [541 DEVICES FOR FEEDING PARTICULATE 3.203.599 8/1965 Renner 222/413 x PRODUCTS S s POWDERED 0 3,669,076 6/1972 Ellis 222/169 X 1,298,766 4/1919 Morgan 222/413 X GRANULAR MATERIALS FROM A 2,409,619 10/1946 Fitch 222/386 CONTAINER 1,639,370 8/1927 Flegel 222/345 [75] Inventor: Andre Taupin, Urzy, Fra 3,648,896 3/1972 Baltz 222/168 [73] Assignee: Ste 'lransitube Plan de Campagne, primary Examiner stanley H. n

Cabnesi France Assistant EmminerNorman L. Stack, Jr. 22 Filed; June 20 1 72 Attorney, Agent, or FirmNathaniel A. Humphries [21] Appl. No.: 264,692 [57] ABSTRACT This invention relates to devices for feeding particul l Foreign pp y Data late products such as powdered or granular materials June 29, 1971 France 71.23792 fr m a n n n the object of t inv n i n i o prevent or minimize any tendency for the product to [52] US. Cl. 222/168, 222/413 become packed to form bridges that considerably [51] Int. Cl. 867d 5/00 hamper their removal. In the invention, at least one [58] Field of Search 222/ 169, 172,239,413, part of the container is mounted for rotation on a 222/386, 382, 168, 345; 259/30, 33 smooth surface ofa fixed pedestal. This pedestal has a discharge vessel for the product extending substan- [56] References Cited tially diametrically to the container. Conveniently this UNITED STATES PATENTS discharge channel is trough-shaped. 3,402,918 9/1968 Soulier 259/30 10 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures memo-mam 3799404 SHEET 3 BF 3 T f' E DEVICES FOR FEEDING PARTICULATE PRODUCTS SUCH AS POWDERED OR GRANULAR MATERIALS FROM A CONTAINER The present invention relates to devices for feeding particulate, e.g. powdered or granular, products from a container.

To store powdered or granular products, storage hoppers are used into which the products are loaded at the upper part and flow by gravity to the base thereof. However, many granular materials, and powdered ones especially, have a tendency to become packed and to form bridges which considerably hamper their removal.

To overcome this drawback it is known to use devices in which the vessel containing the product and the base of the vessel, are agitated in a rotary movement, independently one of the other, and in which the product is discharged through a lateral slot provided between the inner sleeve of the vessel and its base.

However, this relatively complicated device requires a rake which is movable relatively to the base of the vessel to assist the lateral discharge of the product.

According to another known device, the vessel is fixed and its base, which is rotatably mounted, incorporates at least one radial aperture for the discharge of the product.

However, this device does not allow the outflow to be acted upon directly from the upper portion of the vessel and furthermore does not prevent the formation of bridges in the product.

It is an object of the invention to overcome or minimise these drawbacks and to effect, in a simple manner, the steady withdrawal of a powdered product from a stored quantity whilst at the same time preventing or minimising the formation of bridges in the product.

According to the invention at least one part of the vessel is rotatably mounted on the smooth surface of a fixed pedestal andhaving a product discharge channel extending substantially diametrically across the vessel.

Other features and advantages of the invention will be better understood from perusal of the description, which is to follow, referring to several examples of embodiment by way of example and with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:-

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of one embodiment of a feeding device for powdered or granular products,

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the device shown in FIG. 1,

FIG. 3 is an axial section through another embodiment of the device,

FIG. 4 is plan view of the device shown in FIG. 3,

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of one method of driving the hopper and of a helical discharge member,

FIG. 6 is an elevation, partly in section, of another embodiment in which the upper portion of the hopper is fixed, and

Referring now to the drawings, in FIGS. 1 and 2 a feeding device is shown comprising a hopper l intended to take powdered or granular product and rotatably mounted, in the direction of Arrow A, on the smooth surface 2 of a fixed pedestal 3, the product actually resting on said pedestal.

The pedestal 3 has a channel 4 extending diametrically across the hopper l and through which the powdered or granular product can flow out when the said hopper is rotatably driven.

In the channel 4 which can take the form of a trough of appropriate circular section in the pedestal 3, is set an extraction means which is formed, in the case of FIGS. 1 and 2, by a helical spring 5 rotatably driven in the direction of the Arrow B to move the product which falls into the channel 4, in the direction of the arrow C. The product is then gathered up at one of the ends of the channel or trough 4. To achieve satisfactory efficiency in the feeder, the edges 6, 6a of the circular channel should be as sharp as possible and the helical spring should be flush with the surface 2 of the pedestal. Although a helical member has been shown as the extraction means, it is clear that any other means, such as an endless chain or a belt, may be used. Near its base, the hopper l is fitted with a flange 7 via which it rests on running and drive means, which will be described subsequently, in connection with FIG. 3, but is not shown in FIGS. 1 and 2.

The feeding device operates in the following manner: the hopper 1 being filled with powdered or granular product, the helical spring 5 is set in motion in the direction of arrow B such that the product which has fallen into the channel 4 at the time of filling, is fed-out in the direction of arrow C. However, the channel being very narrow, a bridge would soon be formed, resulting in running empty, if the hopper l were not driven round in the direction of the arrow A, thus causing the product to tumble down and the channel 4 to be supplied. In fact, the product resting on the surface 2 of the pedestal 3 is to some degree planed off by channel 4 and steady extraction is thus ensured. The product to be extracted may be considered as a solid body rotating about an axis and whose base is being shaved, as is done with a lathe to machine the base of a cylinder.

In FIGS. 3 and 4 an embodiment of the feeder is shown in which the flange 7 similar to those of FIGS. 1 and 2, is guided by lower rollers 8 and upper rollers 9, which are rotatably mounted on brackets 10. The lower rollers 8 support the hopper 1 which has, in the case of FIGS. 3 and 4, a frusto-conical shape, as opposed to the cylindrical shape of that of FIGS. 1 and 2.

Further, the rotary drive of the hopper l and the helical member 5 is effected by a reduction-drive or a variable drive 11 including a first output shaft 12 to which is fixed a roller 13 which is in contact with the upper face of the flange 7 and produces the rotary drive of the hopper, the roller 40 being mounted free to rotate on a second output shaft 15 which is connected to the helical spring.

This arrangement allows the hopper and the helical spring to be driven round differentially. In fact, this amounts to driving the hopper round by a few degrees per turn or number of turns of the helical spring.

According to another embodiment shown in FIG. 5, a single output shaft 16 of a reduction drive or a variable drive is used, which is connected to the helical spring 5 and to which is keyed a roller 17 bearing a projection 18 extending over a certain angle and intended to make contact with the lower face of the flange 7 to move the hopper by a fraction of a revolution when the helical spring is moved by one revolution.

At its end which opens into the discharge orifice for the product, the helical spring 5 of FIGS. 3, 4 and 6 is housed in a funnel l9 and includes at its end a deaggregating member 20 and a torsion-setting device for the helix.

In order to achieve total evacuation of the product in the hopper, a member in the form of a wire 21 (FIG. 3) or a rod of small section is placed diametrically near the surface 2 of the base pedestal 3. This wire-form member 21 moves the product round when the pressure on the wall of the hopper is lower than that on the pedestal.

To seal the device, there is provided, in the space between the pedestal and the base of the hopper, a joint formed by a circular channel 22 in which vanes 23 solidly attached to the base of the hopper 1 are free to rotate.

In the embodiment shown in FIG. 6, the upper portion 24 of the hopper is fixed and rests by means of support brackets 25 on a support plate 26a also bearing the pedestal 3.

In its lower portion, the hopper has a skirt 26 which alone is driven round, in the same manner as described above, via the flange 7. In this case, a joint 27, which may be pneumatic, must be provided between the upper portion 24 of the hopper and the skirt 26.

Naturally, various modifications may be made by a man skilled in the art to the devices which have just been described, solely as non-limiting examples, without departing from the scope of the invention, as deflned by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A device for feeding particulate products at controlled rates from a vertical container, said device comprising a stationary pedestal having a smooth upper plane surface and a lower surface positionable on any planar supporting surface, a bottomless vertical container having a vertical axis with said vertical container being mounted for rotation of its lower end about the said vertical axis on said smooth upper plane surface of said pedestal, drive means for rotating said bottomless vertical container about said vertical axis, a troughshaped channel in said smooth upper plane surface extending transversely beneath and outwardly beyond the periphery of the lower end of said vertical container for receiving particulate products from said vertical container and means for moving particulate products in said trough-shaped channel along the length of said trough-shaped channel to be discharged from one end of said trough-shaped channel outwardly beyond the periphery of said vertical container.

2. The invention of claim 1 in which said means for moving particulate products along the length of said trough-shaped channel includes a helical spring located in said channel and having a diameter less than the depth of said channel and driving means for rotating said spring about its axis.

3. The invention of claim 1 additionally including running members on which said container rests on said pedestal.

4. The invention of claim 1 additionally including a wire-like member fixedly disposed across the bottom end of said container and extending diametrically near the upper surface of said pedestal for engaging particulate products to cause movement of the particulate products into the trough-shaped channel to insure substantially total evacuation of the particulate products from said vertical container.

5. The invention of claim 1 additionally including a seal joint positioned between said pedestal and the lower end of said vertical container, said seal joint including a circular channel surrounding the lower end of said vertical container and vane means extending from the external periphery of the lower end of said vertical container into said channel to remove any particulate products from said circular channel.

6. The invention of claim 1 wherein said drive means includes means for driving said container and said helical spring differentially.

7. The invention of claim 6 wherein said drive means includes two drive shafts, said helical member being connected to one of said drive shafts and a roller connected to the other of said drive shafts and wherein said roller frictionally engages flange means forming a part of the vertical container for rotating said container.

8. The invention of claim 6 wherein said drive means includes a single drive shaft connected to said helical spring and wheel means having a radial drive segment capable of making contact for a fraction of a revolution with flange means forming a portion of the lower end of said vertical container.

9. The invention of claim 1 wherein said vertical container includes an upper portion fixedly supported and a lower portion comprising a skirt concentric with said upper portion, said skirt being rotatably mounted with respect to the upper surface of said pedestal which extends outwardly beyond said skirt.

10. The invention of claim 9 additionally including a circular joint positioned between said fixed portion of said container and said rotatably mounted skirt.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1298766 *May 8, 1917Apr 1, 1919Ralph L MorganBody for trucks.
US1639370 *May 6, 1926Aug 16, 1927Arnold Electric CompanyDispenser
US2409619 *Sep 21, 1943Oct 22, 1946Aro Equipment CorpLever gun
US3203599 *Jun 17, 1963Aug 31, 1965Carrier Mfg CoMetered vibratory conveyor
US3402918 *Dec 20, 1966Sep 24, 1968Columbian CarbonDischarge valve for rotating drum material treater
US3648896 *Apr 17, 1970Mar 14, 1972Baltz George WilliamApparatus for storing and removing silage
US3669076 *Jun 24, 1970Jun 13, 1972Ellis Jacob BRotatable hopper livestock feed dispenser
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4943830 *Mar 7, 1989Jul 24, 1990Xerox CorporationDeveloper dispensing apparatus with a spring element hold down shoe mechanism
US5058776 *Mar 9, 1990Oct 22, 1991General Motors Of Canada LimitedApparatus for dispensing particulate material for foundry furnace relining
US5287801 *Jul 31, 1992Feb 22, 1994Clark Gordon AFlavoring food products
US5385086 *Jun 21, 1994Jan 31, 1995Par-Way GroupElectrostatic assisted dry ingredient deposition apparatus
US5613624 *Jun 8, 1995Mar 25, 1997Bohdan Automation, Inc.Powder dispenser
US6267495 *Mar 14, 1996Jul 31, 2001Process Control CorporationBlender apparatus with precision low-rate metering unit
EP0937002A1 *Nov 3, 1997Aug 25, 1999Jerry R. JohansonHoppers with applied motion to promote flow
WO1998019944A1 *Nov 3, 1997May 14, 1998Jerry R JohansonHoppers with applied motion to promote flow
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/168, 222/413
International ClassificationB65G65/00, B65G65/46
Cooperative ClassificationB65G65/46
European ClassificationB65G65/46