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Publication numberUS3799428 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 26, 1974
Filing dateApr 14, 1972
Priority dateApr 14, 1972
Publication numberUS 3799428 A, US 3799428A, US-A-3799428, US3799428 A, US3799428A
InventorsE Lamming
Original AssigneeE Lamming
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Transparent coin wrapper
US 3799428 A
Abstract
A wrapper for rolls of coins, comprising an elongated strip of transparent sheet plastic having foil affixed to both edges thereof, said strip having transverse lines of weakness at longitudinally spaced intervals so that individual wrappers can be torn off as needed. A longitudinal line of weakness down the center allows the wrapped roll of coins to be broken at that point. Printed on the transparent center portion of the wrapper at longitudinally spaced intervals thereon are indicia showing various coin denominations and corresponding values of the roll for that denomination. Near the end of the wrapper which is on the outside of the roll are printed circles that overlie the denomination and value figures for the roll. The distance from the centers of the circles to each denomination and value figure is equal to the circumference of the coin of that denomination. The foil end portions of the roll can be folded down and pressed flat to close the ends. The transparent center portion of the wrapper allows for visual inspection of coins to verify contents of the roll.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Lamming [4 1 Mar. 26, 1974 TRANSPARENT COIN WRAPPER Ernest V. Lamming, 3619 20th Cres., Vernon, British Columbia, Canada led: Apr. 14, 1972 1 1 Appl. No.: 244,141

[76] Inventor:

[52] US. Cl 229/872, 206/.82, 206/45.34,

206/D1G. 29, 206/3.5 MF [51] Int. Cl. A45c 11/28, B65d 65/04 [58] Field of Search 206/.8.84,

206/45.34, DIG. 16, DIG. 29; 229/35 MF, 51 DB, 87 R, 87.2

Primary ExaminerGeorge E. Lowrance Assistant Examiner-Steven E. Lipman Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Herbert E. Kidder [5 7] ABSTRACT A wrapper for rolls of coins, comprising an elongated strip of transparent sheet plastic having foil affixed to both edges thereof, said strip having transverse lines of weakness at longitudinally spaced intervals so that individual wrappers can be torn off as needed. A longitudinal line of weakness down the center allows the wrapped roll of coins to be broken at that point. Printed on the transparent center portion of the wrapper at longitudinally spaced intervals thereon are indicia showing various coin denominations and corresponding values of the roll for that denomination. Near the end of the wrapper which is on the outside of the roll are printed circles that overlie the denomination and value figures for the roll. The distance from the centers of the circles to each denomination and value figure is equal to the circumference of the coin of that denomination. The foil end portions of the roll can be folded down and pressed flat to close the ends. The transparent center portion of the wrapper allows for visual inspection of coins to verify contents of the roll.

1 Claim, 4 Drawing Figures BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION:

The present invention pertains to coin wrappers of the type used to wrap rolls of coins, and is particularly adapted for use with the device for measuring the coins and wrapping them in rolls which is shown and described in my pending application, Ser. No. 152,270, filed June 11, 1971. The said device forms the coins into a roll, and wraps them in a flat paper wrapper, the ends of which are subsequently folded down over the ends of the coins and pressed flat.

One problem that has long troubled banks and financial institutions is the fraudulent practice by some larcenous individuals, of wrapping slugs into rolls and passing them off as coins. This has made it necessary for some banks to establish the practice of breaking the roll to verify the contents, and then recounting the coins, but this is a time-consuming practice which the banks would like to eliminate, if possible. In spite of all precautions, there is a substantial loss due to the inclusion of slugs or other material in wrapped rolls of coins which are not broken and inspected, and there has long been a need for some means to verify, by visual inspection, that the contents of the roll are genuine coins of the denomination they are represented to be.

Another objectionable feature of the paper wrapper used heretofore is the fact that the roll of coins, if accidentally dropped on the floor, will almost invariably burst and scatter coins all over the floor.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION:

The primary object of the present in vention is to provide a new and improved wrapper for rolls of coins, which has a transparent center portion that allows the coins to be inspected visually without breaking the roll, to verify the contents.

Another important object of the invention is to provide a continuous strip of coin wrappers joined together by lines of weakness, so that the strip can be rolled up for convenience of storage and dispensing, and individual wrappers can be torn off as needed.

Another object of the invention is to provide a wrapper that is tough enough to resist bursting if the roll of coins is accidentally dropped on the floor from a height equivalent to a counter top or tabletop, while at the same time capable of being readily broken open by striking the edge of the roll against the sharp corner of a tabletop or cash register.

Another object of the invention is to provide a wrapper having a transparent center section through which the coins can be seen, said center section haveng longitudinaly spaced indicia printed thereon showing various coin denominations and the value of a roll made up of that particular denomination, together with two circles printed on the wrapper at one end thereof, which circles overlie the respective coin denominations and roll values, when the roll has been made up. The circled values are immediately apparent, and no further designation is necessary. This is accomplished by spacing the indicia from the centers of the circles by distances equal to the circumference of the respective coins, so that one wrap of the wrapper places the circles directly over the coin denomination and roll value for that particular coin.

Still a further object of the invention is to provide a transparent coin wrapper having metal foil ends which can be folded down and pressed flat against the ends of the roll of coins, and which remain firmly flattened and smoothly folded down.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art from the following detailed description'of the preferred embodiment thereof, with reference to the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a roll of coin wrappers embodying the invention, showing one wrapper partially torn away from the others;

FIG. 2 is an elevational view of a single, detached wrapper, as it appears when laid flat;

FIG. 3 is a side elevation of a roll of coins wrapped in the wrapper of the present invention, showing the foil at one end partially folded down over the end of the coins; and

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the roll of coins in FIG. 3, showing the partially folded down end.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT:

In the drawings, the invention is designated in its entirety by the reference numeral 10, and comprises a plurality of individual rectangular wrappers 12, joined to one another by lines of weakness l4to form an elongated, continuous strip that can be rolled up into the roll 16. The lines of weakness 14 may be formed by perforations, or closely-spaced knife slits.

The center section 18 of the wrapper 12 is made of transparent plastic sheet, such as polyethylene, of 2 or 3 mils thickness, and affixed to opposite edges of the plastic sheet are narrow strips 20 and 22 of metal foil, preferably aluminum foil, of about 2 mils thickness.

Extending lengthwise down the center of the transparent section 18 is a line of closely-slaced knife slits, or perforations 24, forming a line of weakness at the center of the roll, which can be broken by striking the roll against a sharp corner. On one side of the line 24 are a plurality of indicia 26 representing the denominations of coins, and on the other side of the line are corresponding roll value indicia 28 for coins of that respective coin denomination. Near the end 30 of the wrapper which is on the outside of the finished roll are two circles 32 and 34 which are arranged in line with indicia 26 and 28, respectively, and which overlie the corresponding coin denomination and roll value when the roll has been made up, as best shown in FIG. 3. This is accomplished by spacing the indicia 26, 28 from the circles 32, 34 by a distance corresponding to the circumference of the respective coins. Thus, the 10 denomination is spaced from the center of circle 32 the circumference of a dime; the l' denomination by the circumference of a penny; the 5 denomination by the circumference of a nickel; and so on: The roll values of $5.00 for dimes, 51 for pennies, $2.00 for nickels, etc., are standard rollvalues, based on 50 dimes of pennies, 40 nickels or quarters, and 20 half dollars or dollars. The different rolls are of slightly different lengths, and the distance from the inner edge of foil strip 20 to the inner edge of foil strip 22 is the same as the length of the shortest roll of coins, which is the roll of 50 dimes, so that all of the dimes in the roll will be visible through the transparent plastic 18. The end coins of a roll of pennies, nickles, quarters, half dollars,

and dollars will be concealed beneath the foil strips 20 and 22. To avoid having these end coins completely hidden under the foil, the inner edges of the foil strips 20, 22 may be serrated or notched, so that the end coins can be seen.

Extending transversely across wrapper 12 near end 30 is an opaque strip 36, preferably white in color, which can be written on with a ballpoint pen, to allow a depositor to write his account number and name.

The mode of using the invention is clearly described in my pending application Ser. No. 152,270, now US. Pat. No. 3,710,544, to which reference may be had. An individual wrapper 12 is torn off the strip 10, as in FIG. 1, and is placed in a wrapping device, under a roll of coins. The wrapper is then wrapped around the roll of coins, with the end 30 on the outside. The wrapped roll of coins is lifted out of the rolling device, and the foil ends 20 and 22 are folded down flat over the ends of the coins. FIGS. 3 and 4 show foil 22 partially folded down and pressed flat. The two upstanding ears of foil 22 are next folded down and smoothed fiat against the ends of the roll of coins, in the usual manner, after which foil end 20 is folded down and smoothed flat. Aluminum foil has one property that makes it particularly suitable for the ends of the rolls, and that is its tendency to fold down flat and remain flat, with no springback or tendency to open out, which is a characteristic of paper.

It will be noted that circle 34 lies directly over the 0 {figure in column 28, and circle 32 lies directly over the 1 figure in column 26. This shows that the roll consists of 50 pennies, with a total roll'value of 50 necessarily limited to the exact forms shown and described herein, but might take various other forms within the scope of the claims.

I claim:

1. A transparent wrapper for a roll of coins, comprising a generally rectangular sheet of transparent polyethylene plastic having strips of aluminum foil affixed to opposite side edges thereof, said strips of foil being spaced apart so that their inner edges are substantially the same distance apart as the length of said roll of coins, and the width of said strips being such that they extend beyond the ends of the roll sufficiently to provide portions that can be folded down and pressed flat against the ends of the roll, the edges of said coins being visible through the transparent sheet of plastic for substantially the full length of the roll to provide a visual check on the contents of said roll;

said wrapper comprising one of a plurality of individual wrappers joined together in single thickness and end-to-end along lines of weakness to form a continuous strip from which individual wrappers can be torn as needed;

said wrapper having a line of weakness down the middle of said sheet of transparent polyethylene plastic, whereby the roll can be broken at that point to empty coins from said wrapper;

the transparent polyethylene sheet portion of the wrapper having a plurality of coin denomination and roll value indicia printed thereon, and having a pair of surrounds printed on its end adjacent the end of the wrapper that is on the outside of the roll, said surrounds being spaced from each of said coin denomination and roll value indicia by a distance equal to the circumference ofa coin of that denomination, whereby one complete wrap of the wrapper causes said surrounds to enclose and frame the correct coin denomination andcorresponding roll value indicia; and

said wrapper having an opaque, light-colored area at the end thereof which is on the outside of the roll,

upon which identifying information can be written.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1379751 *Sep 25, 1919May 31, 1921Downey Clement LCoin-wrapper
US1511188 *Apr 4, 1923Oct 7, 1924Spurgin Mfg CompanyWindow coin wrapper
US1848119 *Nov 20, 1930Mar 8, 1932A P W Paper Company IncWrapper
US2042022 *Oct 3, 1932May 26, 1936Loyal J MillerCoin wrapper
US2507626 *Nov 1, 1943May 16, 1950Ekstrand Mfg Co IncMethod of making coin wrappers
US3032249 *Nov 18, 1960May 1, 1962Irene M KollarTubular cooking container
US3282494 *Mar 8, 1965Nov 1, 1966Tarn John WCoin wrapper with window therein
US3533501 *Feb 11, 1969Oct 13, 1970Dorsett George LWindowed coin package
AT16900B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4139119 *Jan 30, 1978Feb 13, 1979Champion International CorporationSift proof carton
US4546875 *Jul 6, 1983Oct 15, 1985Pauline C. ZweberCoin wrapper
US4996822 *Jun 1, 1990Mar 5, 1991Truppe Robert BCylindrical roll
US5197661 *Jun 3, 1992Mar 30, 1993Sanchez Martha LSee-through storage container
US5516038 *Oct 31, 1994May 14, 1996Corticella Molini E Pastifici S.P.A.Packaging containers, particularly suitable for pasta, rice, and other dry food products
US7059792 *Feb 10, 2004Jun 13, 2006Translucent Technologies, LlcWebs; pattern of ties; tearing slits; separation into sheets
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/87.2, 206/459.5, 229/87.5, 229/164.1, 206/820
International ClassificationG07D9/00
Cooperative ClassificationG07D9/006, Y10S206/82
European ClassificationG07D9/00C2B