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Publication numberUS3799506 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 26, 1974
Filing dateApr 14, 1972
Priority dateApr 14, 1972
Also published asCA988762A1
Publication numberUS 3799506 A, US 3799506A, US-A-3799506, US3799506 A, US3799506A
InventorsSchwartz G
Original AssigneeSchwartz G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fence
US 3799506 A
Abstract
A fence comprising a pair of spaced posts having a plurality of aligned panels passing therebetween. The panels are woven around a plurality of vertically extending bars. The panels and posts are preferably formed from aluminum. The panels are maintained between a top rail and a bottom rail, and are secured to end rails that are slidably mounted within the top and bottom rails. Tension is applied to the panels by securing the end rails to the posts. The top and bottom rails are vertically slidable within the posts, and accordingly variations in the land contour can be accommodated by varying the vertical position of the rails in the posts.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Schwartz 1 1 Mar. 26, 1974 FENCE 3,385.567 5/1968 Case et a1. 256/24 [76] Inventor: Gerald L. Schwartz, 3682 Sipler Ln., Huntingdon Valley, Pa. 19006 [22] Filed: Apr. 14, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 244,012

[52] US. Cl 256/24, 256/37, 256/73 [51] Int. Cl E04h 17/14 [58] Field of Search 256/24, 19, 21, 22, 25, 256/59, 65-70; 160/375, 376

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,045,837 12/1912 Haget l60/376X 2,246,580 6/1941 Farmer 160/175 X 3,005,623 10/1961 Kusel et a1. 256/67 3,045,976 7/1962 Nayhouse et a1. 256/24 3,083,951 4/1963 Huret 256/22 X 2,590,929 4/1952 Bush 256/21 UX 3,304,683 2/1967 Ferreira 256/24 X Primary Examiner-Dennis L. Taylor Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Caesar, Rivise, Bernstein & Cohen [57] ABSTRACT A fence comprising a pair of spaced posts having a plurality of aligned panels passing therebetween. The panels are woven around a plurality of vertically extending bars. The panels and posts are preferably formed from aluminum. The panels are maintained between a top rail and a bottom rail, and are secured to end rails that are slidably mounted within the top and bottom rails. Tension is applied to the panels by securing the end rails to the posts. The top and bottom rails are vertically slidable within the posts, and accordingly variations in the land contour can be accommodated by varying the vertical position of the rails in the posts.

6 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures PATENTED MAR 2 6 I974 SHEET 3 [1F 3 FENCE This invention relates to a fence, and more particularly, to a fence including woven panels that are securable in spaced posts.

Various fences have been developed for granting both security and privacy to the user. Generally, these fences include panels which prevent outsiders from looking into the area surrounded by the fence. A popular type of fence of this type is a wooden fence having woven panels secured in end posts.

' nance problems of the wooden fences, and these have been to construct a metal fence which would simulate the weave of the wooden fences. However, this fence is not nearly as attractive as the wooden weave fences, and does not trulysimulate the woven pattern of the panels. In this metallic fence the various panels are formed to be rigid. The panels are stacked and alternately pass on opposite sides of a single rod, regardless of the width of the fence. The panels are aligned at their ends. The formed fence does not give a truly woven appearance since the panels are not actually woven, but are merely stacked onalternately opposite sides of a center vertical rod.

The fence of this invention overcomes all of the problems'of the priorart wooden and metal fences, while in addition, enjoying a number of advantages of its own. The fence is made entirely of aluminum or appropriately treated steel, and therefore is virtually maintenance free. The panels are actually woven around spacer bars, and simulate the attractive wooden fences currently in use. The panels can be finished in a redwood color, which further simulates the wooden panels. i i

One of the features of the fence of this invention is that it is readily adaptable to being used on sloping surfaces. Thus, there is no problem with installing the fence on hills or on other areas where there is a sudden depression or rise.

Another feature of the fence of this invention is that the ends of the panels are riveted to end rails. In the prior metal fence the ends of the panels are loosely slidable in the end post, and can be inadvertently removed and easily damaged. The panels of this invention are securely held in place in the end post.

Another feature of the fence of this invention is that the panels loosely float between the posts. When a panel section is installed between the posts, tension is applied to the side rails, thereby securely holding the panels in a taut, woven position.

It is therefore an object of this invention to provide a novel fence.

It is another object of this invention to provide a fence comprising a plurality of woven metal panels.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a fence having a section that is adjustable to accommodate vertical changes in the terrain on which the fence is located.

These and other objects of this invention are accomplished by providing a fence comprising a pair of posts and a fence section mounted in said posts, said fence section comprising a top rail, a bottom rail, a plurality of vertical rods secured to said top and bottom rails and a plurality of panels woven through said rods.

Other objects and many of the attendant advantages of this invention will be readily appreciated as the same becomes better understood by reference to the following detailed description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of the fence of this invention, as mounted in place;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged sectional view taken along the line 22 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken along the line 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is an exploded perspective view, partially broken away, showing the mounting of a side rail of the fence section in the top rail of the section; and

FIG. 5 is an exploded perspective view of a portion of an end post and a portion of a fence section, partially broken away and with parts removed for the purpose of clarity.

Referring now in greater detail to the various figures of the drawings wherein like reference characters refer to like parts, a fence embodying the present invention is generally shown at 10 in FIG. 1.. Device 10 basically comprises a plurality of fence sections .12 which are supported at their ends by a plurality of spaced posts 14.

As best seen in FIGS. 2 and 5, each post 14 includes a center plate 16 and end plates 18 which extend perpendicularly to plate 16. Each end plate 18 includes a pair of flanges 20 projecting perpendicularly from its ends. Each flange 20 includes an inwardly projecting lip 22, the purpose of which is to prevent any sharp edge at the end of the flange.

The posts 14 have a substantial length, as seen in FIG. 1, and are formed by a continuous extrusion process. The posts are then cut to the desired lengths after the extrusion has been completed. The length of the posts will vary, depending on the length and height of the fence sections 12 that are to be secured. Generally, the posts will be at least 24 inches: deep in the ground for a 48 inch fence and 30 inches in the ground for a inch or 72 inch fence. The heights of the fences can vary, generally from 4 to 6 feet. Where the fence will be used in a locality subject to extreme ground frost and/or high winds, it may be advisable to allow an extra 6 inches of depth for the post mounting.

As seen in FIGS. 1 and 2, each fence section 12 includes a top rail 24, a bottom rail 26, end rails 28and 29, panels 30 and divider rods 32. As seen in FIGS. 4 and 5, each top rail 24 is basically U-shaped, and includes a pair of vertical legs 34 having an integral bridging section 36. A lip 38 extends inwardly from each leg 34 and extends for the entire length of each leg. An L-shaped bracket 40 having a horizontal leg 42 and a vertical leg 44 is slidably mounted in top rail 24. Leg 44 includes a pair of aligned notches 46 in the edges thereof. Lips 38 are received in notches 46, and serve as tracks for the sliding movement of bracket 40 relative to top rail 24.

End rail 28, as seen in FIG. 4, is also basically U- shaped, and includes a pair of legs 48 and an integral bridging section 50. Lips 52 project inwardly from the ends of legs 48. Bridging section 50 includes an upper hole 54 which is alignable with a hole 56 in bracket 40.

Side rail 28 is secured to bracket 40 by a rivet 58 (FIG. 3) passing through aligned holes 54 and 56. It is seen by reference to FIG. 4 that whenthe end rail 28 is secured to bracket 40, the end rail will be slidable relative to top rail 24 since the bracket 40 is slidable relative to top rail 24. End rail 29 and bottom rail 26 are identical in cross section to the cross sections of rails 24 and 28, which are also identical. Likewise the securement of side rail 29 to top rail 24 is identical to the securement of end rail 28 to top rail 24. Identical sliding connections are also provided between the side rails and the bottom rail 26 through the use of L-shaped brackets 40. Thus, the side or end rails 28 and 29 are both slidable relative to the top and bottom rails 24 and 26.

Since the rails 24, 26, 28 and 29 are identical in cross section, they are all cut from the same extrusion. As seen in FIG. 3, the top edge of side rail 28 will abut the lower edge of top rail 24 in the assembled condition of the fence section 12.

Since the bottom rail 26 is identical in cross section to the top rail 24, it is also U-shaped, and includes a pair of legs 60 (FIG. 1) and a bridging section 62 (FIG. 2). However, in the'bottom rail, the legs 60 project upwardly, instead of downwardly, as in the case of the top rail 24. Divider rods 32 are hollow and square in cross section, as seen in FIG. 2. The divider rods are received between the legs of the upper rail 24 and the legs of the lower rail 26, and secured in place by rivets 64. The panels 30 comprise elongated rectangular sheets of aluminum. They are woven through divider rods 32 and are secured at their ends to end rails 28 and 29. As seen in FIG. 1, each successive panel is woven on the opposite side of each divider rod 32. The aluminum sheets are sufficiently pliable to easily permit their weaving in and out of the divider rods. The end of each panel 30 is provided with a right angle bend 66 (FIG. 4) which has the same width as the bridging section 50 of an end rail. As seen in FIGS. 3 and 5, each end 66 of a panel is secured to the bridging section 50 of the end rail by a rivet 68. As seen in FIGS. 2 and 5, the ends 66 of the panels 30 project inwardly from opposite sides of the end rail as they progress downwardly in the fence section. This is because the panels 32 are woven on opposite sides of the divider rods 32 as they progress downwardly in the fence section, as is apparent in FIG. 5.

Center plate 16 of post 14 is provided with a plurality of spaced, aligned openings or slots 70 therein (FIGS. 3 and Bridging section 50 of each end rail 28 and 29 is provided with a plurality of vertically spaced aligned openings 72 therein. Likewise, similar openings 74'are provided in the portions 66 of each panel 30. As will be explained in greater detail hereinafter, when sections 12 are inserted in posts 14, they are secured in place by bolts 76 which pass through aligned openings 70, 72 and 74, and associated nuts 78 (FIG. 3).

As seen in FIGS. 3 and 5, a U-shaped cap 80 is placed on each post 14 after the fence sections 12 have been installed. The cap is held in place by a pressed fit, and when it is desired to remove a fence section 12, the cap can be pried off.

The installation of the fence of this invention is apparent from a review of FIG. 1. Posts 14 are first mounted in the ground bydigging holes to the proper depth and then filling the holes with concrete, as indicated at 82. The posts are spaced a distance equal to the approximate length of each fence section 12. It should be kept in mind that when the posts are secured in the ground, the caps are not yet in place, and the posts are open at their tops.

After the posts have been secured in place, the fence sections 12 are slid into the posts by passing the sections between the flanges 20, as best seen in FIG. 2. At this point, the ends of the top rails 24 and bottom rails 26 will abut the center plate 16 of each post (FIGS. 2 and 3). It should be kept in mind that the end rails 28 and 29 are freely slidable within the top and bottom rails, and accordingly there is no tension on the panels 32. After the sections 12 have been dropped in place, they are secured by passing bolts 76 through aligned holes 70, 72 and 74 and securing the bolts in place by nuts 78. It should be noted that since panels 30 pass on only one side of end rails 28 or 29 at any given level, the openings 70, 72 and 74 are readily accessible through the opening between flanges 20 for inserting the nuts and bolts.

When the nuts 78 are tightened, the nuts and bolts serve the dual function of securing the fence sections 12 in place and placing a tension on the panels 30. Thus, as is apparent from FIG. 3, the tightening of the nuts 78 pulls adjacent end rails 28 and 29 toward each other, thereby sliding the end rails relative to the top and bottom rails. Since the panels 30 are riveted to the end rails, they will be pulled taut when the nuts are tightened.

The portion of the fence shown in FIG. 3 illustrates the condition of the fence sections 12.when they are used on a flat, level area. However, where there is a depression in the land, as shown for the righthand section 12 in FIG. 1, one section will be lower than the adjacent section when installed. The fence of this invention is readily adapted for adjustment to accommodate changes in terrain. Thus, where there is only a slight drop between one section and the adjacent section, this can be accommodated by placing a bolt 76 in the lower opening 72 of the higher section and passing the bolt through the higher opening 72 in the adjacent section. In this way, changes in elevation of each section can be accommodated without drilling additional holes in either section. However, where it is apparent that it will be impossible to align the holes from one section with those in an adjacent section, holes can easily be drilled in one of the sections after the section is in place. Here again, it should be recalled that the bridging section 50 of an end rail is readily accessible through the opening between flanges 20, as is apparent in FIGS. 2 and 5. Thus, the hole can easily be drilled with the fence sections in place. 7

After the fence sections are in place, the posts 14 are covered by end caps 80. If it is ever necessary to replace or repair a section 12, the section can easily be removed by removing the two end caps bridging the section, removing the bolt securing the section in place, and sliding the section vertically upward and out of the posts 14 which secured the section. Thereafter, a repaired or a new section can be dropped into place. The fence is completed through the use of end posts, and where the fence will project in more than one direction, corner posts are provided by utilizing a second post 12 adjacent the end post. The opening between the flanges of the second post extends perpendicularly to the opening in the end post, thereby changing the direction of the fence. The corner posts and the end posts are constructed in the same manner as the posts described, and accordingly all the features of adjustment are incorpo rated in the end posts and corner posts.

.One of the features of this invention is the fact that the entire fence can be formed from aluminum. The posts, rails, end caps and divider rods are all formed from extrusions which are cut to the desired lengths. The panels 30 can be given a durable baked finish, thereby rendering the fence substantially maintenance free. If desired, the panels can also be given a simulated wood grain which would give the fence the appearance of the prior art redwood or other wooden fences. The extrusions can also be anodized or given a durable baked, painted finish. Additionally, the extrusions can be given a simulated wood grain to have them match the grain given to the panels 30. Thus, there is complete flexibility in varying the appearance of all of the elements of the fence.

If desired, holes 70, 72 and 74 can be provided for each panel 30, or the number of holes can be staggered to omit certain of the panels. As seen in FIG. 5, the holes are provided for the first panel, and omitted for the next two panels. Generally speaking, the higher or longer the fence section, the greater the number of bolts that will be required, and accordingly, the greate the number of holes that will be required.

One of the features of this invention is the fact that the panels and end rails freely float in the top and bottom rails prior to the assembly of the fence section in the posts. Having this structure facilitates the ease of handling of the fence section, and greatly facilitates the fabrication of the fence section. The necessary tension is supplied when the fence sections are installed solely by the tightening of the nuts 78 on the bolts 76.

It should also be noted that when the tension is placed on the adjacent fence sections 12 by the bolts 76 and nuts 78, this tension is not transmitted to the posts 14, as is apparent from FIG. 3. Thus, the fence sections 12, are actually secured to each other by the bolts, but the bolts pass through the slots in the post 14. It is also apparent that the posts will support the fence sections, but there is no force tending to pull the posts when the nuts are tightened. The only posts that will be under any pulling tension from the bolts will be the end posts.

One method of installation of the fence has been described above. One possible problem with this method of installation will occur when the fence sections are 6 feet high. Thus, the fence sections will have to be lifted 6 feet in the air in order to drop them between a pair of pre'set posts. Although this can be accomplished, there is an alternative method of installation which will obviate any problem of lifting the fence sections. In the alternative method of installation, the fence line is first laid out and post holes are dug every six,feet along the fence line. Thereafter, the first post is placed in the ground and cemented in place as shown at 82 in FIG. 1.

With the first post in place, a fence section 12 is then slid laterally into the opening between a pair of flanges (FIG. 2). This is easily accomplished since the width of the fence section is less than the distance between the flanges.

The first section of the fence which is now in place is secured in place through the use of nuts and bolts which are hand-tightened. The next post is then slid onto the exposed and of the fence: section and dropped into its pre-dug hole. The fence section is then loosely secured to the post through the use of nuts and bolts, and the post is cemented in place. Additional fence sections and posts are added in the manner described above.

The concrete is then given one day in which to set. and all of the fence sections are then properly aligned. After they have been aligned, the nuts and bolts are tightened to form a permanent installation.

Either method of installation will insure proper functioning and durability of the fence in use.

Instead of using the U-shaped extruded and cut caps 80, other decorative caps can be used. For instance, the cap can be formed from a plastic and will have a top surface and four dependent walls. This cap will also be secured in place by a pressed or friction fit, and can be removed whenever it is necessary or desired to remove a fence section.

Although the fence of this invention is preferably formed from aluminum, other metals, such as steel, can be used. The steel can be galvanized and/or painted for the purpose of durability. The same decorative finishes can be applied to the steel as are applied to the aluminum.

If desired, the lips 38 (FIG. 4) engaged in the notches 46 of brackets 40 can be eliminated. Thus, the bracket 40 will freely slide within the top and bottom rails without the necessity of providing the track arrangement through the engagement of the lips in the notches. In this connection, it should be recalled that the divider rods 32 secure the top and bottom rails, and maintain them in their spaced relation. Likewise, the divider rods also maintain the panels 30 in place. Therefore, the key feature of this aspect of the invention is that the side rails be slidable relative to the top and bottom rails, and this can be accomplished without providing the tracking arrangement shown. However, the tracking arrangement does insure a smooth movement of the side rails relative to the top and bottom rails.

The number of divider rods used will vary depending on the length of each section 12. Generally speaking, three divider rods will be used for each 6 foot section. Where the sections are smaller in length, the number of divider rods will be proportionately reduced.

Another feature of this invention is the fact that each of the panels 30 is riveted to both end rails. In the prior art metal fence, the panels are slidably secured in the posts. If the panels should receive a sudden jar, they can be knocked out of the posts. In the device of this invention, the rivets securely hold the panels in place. One of the reasons that the panels can be riveted in place is that there is no tension on the panels at the time they are woven through the divider rods and secured to the end rails. Thus, since the panels are in a relatively tension-free condition when the fence sections are fabricated, they can easily be riveted in place at their ends. Thereafter, as pointed out above, during the installation of the fence sections, the necessary tension is applied to the panels.

Another feature of the riveting is. that the panels are first bent around the end rails 28 and 29 before riveting, as shown at 66. Therefore, when tension is applied to the panels 34), this tension is borne by the bent edge of the panel as well as the rivet 68 (FIG. Accordingly only a single rivet need be used with each panel. If the rivet were placed on the side of the end rail, instead of the back, the entire tension on the panel would be borne by the rivet, which might result in the shearing of the rivet or panel.

Without further elaboration, the foregoing will so fully illustrate my invention, that others may, by applying current or future knowledge, readily adapt the same for use under various conditions of service.

What is claimed as the invention is:

l. A fence comprising a pair of end posts and a fence section mounted on said end posts, said fence section comprising a top rail, a bottom rail and a pair of side rails, said side rail being vertically extending and passing between said top and bottom rails, said side rails being slidably mounted with respect to said top and bottom rails, a plurality of vertical rods secured to said top and bottom rails and a plurality of panels being woven through said rods, said panels being secured on their ends to said side rails, said panels being positioned between said top and bottom rails, and being movable relative thereto, and said panels being pulled taut by means secured in said end posts, said means secured in said end posts being adapted to pass through one of said end posts when two of said fence sections are aligned and have one of each of their side rails secured to said one of said end posts, whereby said secured means pull the panels in said aligned sections taut without applying a tension to said one of said end posts.

2. The fence of claim 1 and further including brackets slidably mounted in said top and bottom rails, said side rails being secured to said brackets, whereby the sliding of said side rails relative to said top and bottom rails results in the sliding of said brackets.

3. The fence of claim 2 wherein said top and bottom rails each include a pair of fingers projecting therefrom, said brackets having notches therein, said fingers being received in said notches, whereby said fingers serve as a track for the sliding of said brackets.

4. The fence of claim 1 wherein each of said panels has two ends, with said panels being secured to said side rails at said ends, each of said ends having a flange that is bent over a corresponding side rail, with said flange being secured to said side rail.

5. The fence of claim 1 wherein each of said posts includes a vertically extending plate, said plate having a plurality of openings formed therein, said openings being spaced and vertically aligned, said side rails having a plurality of openings therein, said openings in said side rails being spaced and vertically aligned, whereby said fence sections may be secured in said posts by securing means passing through said openings in said plates and said side rails.

6. The fence of claim 5 wherein all of said openings comprise vertically extending slots, whereby the position of the fence section relative to the posts is verti-

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3963219 *Apr 30, 1974Jun 15, 1976Amico Anthony J DFence
US4126926 *Nov 1, 1976Nov 28, 1978Amico Anthony J DMethod of constructing a metal paneled fence
US4930752 *Jan 13, 1989Jun 5, 1990Wolper Jr John FHighway fencing
US5078367 *Jul 28, 1988Jan 7, 1992Simpson Alan GPanel system
US6152428 *Nov 30, 1998Nov 28, 2000Simioni; LinoFence system
US6688583Jan 3, 2001Feb 10, 2004Tmc, Inc.Fence post finials
US7071439Aug 26, 2004Jul 4, 2006Edward L. GibbsMethod for barrier assembly
US7159853Aug 26, 2004Jan 9, 2007Edward L. GibbsWelded barrier system
US7282659Sep 18, 2003Oct 16, 2007Edward L. GibbsPanel assembly apparatus
US7621510Apr 12, 2005Nov 24, 2009Edward L. GibbsTerrain-adjustable barrier
US7896318Aug 23, 2010Mar 1, 2011Edward L. GibbsTerrain-conforming barrier
US7980534Jul 6, 2007Jul 19, 2011Edward L. GibbsRackable barrier system
US8523150Dec 1, 2004Sep 3, 2013Edward L. GibbsFence with tiltable picket
US8966848Aug 2, 2013Mar 3, 2015Hunter Douglas Chile S.A.Sun Louvre formed by a structure supporting an interweave of metal sheets
US20050023514 *Aug 26, 2004Feb 3, 2005Gibbs Edward L.Internally welded barrier
US20050023515 *Aug 26, 2004Feb 3, 2005Gibbs Edward L.Barrier formed by resistance projection welding
US20050040382 *Aug 26, 2004Feb 24, 2005Gibbs Edward L.Method for barrier assembly
US20050092978 *Aug 26, 2004May 5, 2005Gibbs Edward L.Welded barrier system
US20050199864 *Apr 12, 2005Sep 15, 2005Gibbs Edward L.Terrain-adjustable barrier
US20050205854 *Dec 1, 2004Sep 22, 2005Edward GibbsFence with tiltable picket
Classifications
U.S. Classification256/24, 256/37, 256/73
International ClassificationE04H17/14
Cooperative ClassificationE04H17/1408
European ClassificationE04H17/14B