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Publication numberUS3799549 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 26, 1974
Filing dateMar 5, 1973
Priority dateMar 5, 1973
Publication numberUS 3799549 A, US 3799549A, US-A-3799549, US3799549 A, US3799549A
InventorsM Laker
Original AssigneeM Laker
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Board game apparatus
US 3799549 A
Abstract
Novel equipment for playing a competitive game of the type in which playing pieces are moved from space to space on a playing board, includes 1. TWO IDENTICAL, COLOR DIFFERENTIATED OPPOSING SETS OF MOVABLE PLAYING PIECES, THE PLAYING PIECES OF EACH SET INCLUDING PIECES AND CLASSES OF PIECES DISTINGUISHED IN APPEARANCE FROM ONE ANOTHER, AND HAVING VARIED, ARBITRARILY ASSIGNED CAPABILITIES AND LIMITATIONS; AND 2. MEANS FOR PRODUCING FOR EACH MATCH A PLAYING BOARD FOR THE MOVABLE PIECES OF UNPLANNED AND UNCONTROLLED RANDOM DESIGN, COMPOSED OF A. A FOUNDATION BOARD HAVING A PLAYING AREA DIVIDED INTO MANY EQUAL MAJOR SQUARES BY RAISED RIBS, AND B. A SUFFICIENT NUMBER OF EQUAL SQUARE TILES, OF VARIED DESIGN BUT OF IDENTICAL SIZE AND SHAPE, TO FIT AND FILL ALL THE RIB BOUNDED SQUARES OF THE FOUNDATION BOARD, EACH TILE HAVING ITS FACE SUB-DIVIDED INTO COLOR DIFFERENTIATED PLAYING SQUARES. In the preferred arrangement some of the tiles have three squares of a first color and one square of a second color; some have three squares of the second color and one square of the first color; and some have two squares of each color. The last mentioned group is further subdivided into two sub-groups, one having squares of like color in diagonally opposite corners, and the other having squares of like color arranged side by side.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 1 3,799,549

Laker Mar. 26, 1974 1 BOARD GAME APPARATUS to space on a playing board, includes [76] Inventor; Michael A. Laker, 1366 wa d 1. two identical, color differentiated opposing sets of Creek Rd, Rogue River, Oreg. movable playing pieces, the playing pieces of each set 97537 1 including pieces and classes of pieces distinguished in Filed: Mar. 1973 appearance from one another, and having varied,

21 Appl. No.: 338,395

Primary Examiner-Delbert B. Lowe Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Clarence M. Crews [57] ABSTRACT Novel equipment for playing a competitive game of the type in which playing pieces are moved from space arbitrarily assigned capabilities and limitations; and

2. means for producing for each match a playing board for the movable pieces of unplanned and uncontrolled random design, composed of a. a foundation board having a playing area divided into many equal major squares by raised ribs, and

b. a sufficient number of equal square tiles, of varied design but of identical size and shape, to fit and fill all the rib bounded squares of the foundation board, each tile having its face sub-divided into color differentiated playing squares. In the preferred arrangement some of the tiles have three squares of a first color and one square of a second color; some have three squares of the second color and one square of the first color; and some have two squares of each color. The last mentioned group is further subdivided into two sub-groups, one having squares of like color in diagonally opposite corners, and the other having squares of like color arranged side by side.

7 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures la 3Q Jae em 1-141 y ail was? no me PAn-jmwmzs 1914 3; 799549 SIXTEEN ELEVEN F/VE IVE 5m 7 /6 2o ZZ/m TH/RTEE/V F/VE TWO o/vs 3. TH/RTEEA/ FIVE TWO ONE BOARD GAME APPARATUS This invention relates to novel equipment for playing an annihilative, competitive match or game of the board type in which competitive pieces having arbitrarily assigned capabilities and limitations are moved from square to square and can figuratively capture or destroy opposing pieces.

Primarily the game is designed to resemble actual tactical warfare, where two players meet and engage each other on neutral terrain and determine the outcome of a battle.

The game somewhat resembles chess in that different capabilities and limitations are assigned to various identifiable playing pieces. It also resembles checkers in that it is a game of complete annihilation. It differs radically from either of these games, however, both in its rules, and in the fact that a playing board is provided which is of variable, random design, different for each match, as opposed to the board of fixed design used for both checkers and chess.

The present playing equipment includes a foundation board having a playing area which is subdivided into major squares, preferably by raised ribs, and at least a sufficient number of varied tiles is provided to fit and fill all the major square spaces. The tiles are not playing pieces. They are components of the random playing board. Each tile is desirably divided into four playing squares, there being tiles having one gold square and three brown squares; tiles having one brown square and three gold squares; and tiles having two squares of each of these colors. The tiles of the last mentioned group consist of two sub-groups, one having squares of like color in diagonally opposite corners and the other having squares of like color side by side.

The tiles are not playing pieces. They combine with the foundation board to provide for each match a randomly determined playing board pattern.

The playing equipment is completed by the provision of identical opposing sets of movable red and blue playing pieces, each set including movable pieces and classes of pieces, of distinctive appearance and designation, and of permanently, arbitrarily assigned capabilities and limitations. The object of each player is to clear the board of opposing pieces.

With this kind of board makeup, equipment, and collection of playing pieces, some tile combinations will produce a very even game, while others will give a decided advantage to one player or the other. Ordinarily, therefore, a match will consist of two games on any given random arrangement of the board, with the player who goes first in the first game yielding that privilege to his adversary in the second game.

In this specification the playing squares of contrasting colors are referred to as brown and gold, and the opposing playing pieces are referred to as red and blue, respectively. These specific colors are used illustratively, for simplicity, convenience and brevity, and not in a limiting sense. Any differentiating colors or other suitable means of differentiation may be employed with regard to the playing squares and with regard to the playing pieces. The foundation board, including the raised ribs, is desirably white, as are the tile markings which separate the playing squares, but here again no limitation is intended.

The primary object of the invention is to provide playing equipment for a novel and interesting game'or games, involving imagination, ingenuity and penetrating analysis, which cannot be played with previously known game equipment.

Other objects and advantages will hereinafter appear.

In the drawing forming part of this specification,

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a composite playing board made up of a foundation board and pattern defining tiles of varied characteristics, the tiles being omitted in a portion of the playing area to reveal more clearly the structure of the foundation board;

FIG. 2 is a composite view showing four different designs of tiles and the number of each provided in a preferred embodiment of the invention; and

FIGS. 3 and 4 show the varied kinds of playing pieces assigned to the players and the number of each kind provided to make up the complete quota for each player.

THE PLAYING EQUIPMENT THE PLAYING BOARD The foundation board 10 is desirably a square board of any suitable material, having suitably wide corner and marginal areas for the accommodation of unplayed pieces, and a playing area 12 of the design shown. The playing area of the foundation board is desirably depressed slightly relative to the corner and marginal areas, and it is divided into squares by raised ribs 114, as shown, the ribs desirably standing substantially flush with the corner and marginal areas of the board.

As shown, the playing area comprises 37 major squares arranged by rows having, respectively, from top to bottom: first row and seventh row, three squares each; second row and sixth row, five squares each; and third, fourth and fifth rows, seven squares each; making 37 major squares altogether.

For filling the thirty-seven empty major square spaces, at least 37 square tiles are provided. Each tile is designed comfortably to fit any one of the rib-defined squares of the foundation board 10. As shown, each tile is divided into four equal playing squares, so that the playing area is made to contain 148 playing squares altogether.

Because of pattern variations of the tiles, the available tiles, assembled at random, can and will produce a seemingly unlimited number of varied playing board designs.

As illustratively shown, there are sixteen tiles l6 having two brown playing squares in two diagonally opposite corners, and two gold playing squares in the other two diagonally opposite corners. There are eleven tiles 18 having two brown playing squares side by side and two gold playing squares side by side. There are five tiles 20 having one brown playing square and three gold playing squares, and five tiles 22 having one gold playing square and three brown playing squares.

Each tile 16 has two significantly different orientations with reference to adjacent tiles, while each of the tiles 18, 20 and 22 has four significantly different orientations with reference to adjacent tiles.

The design of the playing board for any given match must be left entirely to chance. This may be controlled in various ways. Desirable regulations for board preparation may desirably be, for example, as follows:

All tiles are shuffled, face down. Each tile is then placed over a selected square into which it is to be fitted and is then turned face up in the definitely oriented relation in which it is to be placed.

The tile combination could be varied, if desired, from that described above. It is desirable but not essential to so arrange matters that there will be equal numbers of brown and gold squares in the entire set. Whatever combination of tile sets is settled upon should be consistently followed, so that all game sets will be alike. All sets of rules put out should also be alike.

THE PLAYING PIECES The equipment is completed by the provision of two color-differentiated, but otherwise identical, sets of suitable playing pieces, the pieces of each set being distinguished herein by letters I, C, A and G. The letters I, C, A and G signify, respectively, infantry, cavalry", artillery and general. This method of identification has been adopted for convenience in the present drawing and specification. The pieces may be made of conspicuously distinctive appearance, in any way desired, as is done with chess pieces.

Each side desirably has 13 infantry pieces I, five cavalry pieces C, two artillery pieces A, and one general piece G.

THE RULES OF THE GAME It is not essential to include in this specification the full rules of the game, but a brief allusion to some of the salient features will be illuminating.

BEGINNING OF PLAY At the outset no pieces are on the board. The players take turns in alternation. The player who has the right to first turn enters a piece in a marginal playing square along any one of the four six-square margins of the board. If he has chosen an east or west margin, all of his pieces thereafter entered must be entered along the east and west margins and all of his opponents pieces must be entered along the north and south margins. If he has chosen a north or south margin, all of his pieces must be entered from north and south, and his opponents pieces from east and west. Any piece may be entered upon an unoccupied square of either color.

A player limited to opposite sides for entry of pieces can enter any number of his pieces from oneside, with the single exception that his artillery pieces must be entered from opposite sides.

BASIC METHODS OF MOVEMENT After the first single entering move, each player makes two consecutive moves, not one, when it is his turn to move. This may consist of entering two pieces, of entering one piece and moving another, or of moving two pieces already entered. A piece can only be entered on a vacant playing square.

Any piece entered on a chosen color must normally remain on that color throughout, except that a general may change colors at will. Any other piece may change color by moving from one square adjacent to its general to a square of opposite color adjacent to its general. The piece may change color under the prescribed conditions as often, and as many times, as may be convenient and, in the opinion of the player, strategically advantageous.

Each piece may move in any direction or combination of directions, subject to color restrictions, and subject to the following limitations: artillery one square; infantry or general two squares or less; cavalry four squares or less. The general may move only one square when changing color.

An infantry piece located on a square vertically or horizontally adjacent to an unoccupied square of the same color may serve as a bridge tender to enable a friendly infantry, general or cavalry piece on a square of opposite color to move across the unoccupied square, without changing color.

INTERACTION OF PIECES A cavalry piece charges in a vertical, horizontal or diagonal direction, exclusively along one color, any opposing piece located on a square of the same color two or more squares away. This means that he moves onto the square of the charged piece and removes it from the board. The cavalry piece is not limited with regard to the number of squares in its charge, provided he does not change color.

An artillery piece is within range of any opposing piece located one or two squares away on either color. When two artillery pieces are in range of an opposing piece, they may fire upon and destroy that piece. The destroyed piece is removed from play and put in the discard. This may be done without moving the artillery if they are already in range, or by moving the artillery into range and then firing. Any artillery piece remains in the position from which it fired neither artillery piece may move to the square occupied by the destroyed piece. An artillery piece may not fire more than once per turn, or fire at more than one piece per turn, or move after it has fired. A single artillery piece is ineffective against combat pieces (infantry, cavalry, artillery), but may fire upon and destroy the opposing general.

An infantry piece pins (immobilizes) any opposing combat piece or pieces located on an adjacent square or squares of the opposite color. It may not pin the general.

An infantry piece charges from an adjacent square any opposing piece, other than infantry, located on a square of the same color. That piece is then removed in the same manner described for charging cavalry.

Infantry may attack opposing infantry by moving two infantry pieces adjacent to one infantry piece located on a square of the same color. The defending infantry piece must then withdraw from its position in its turn. All attacks other than 2-1 (i.e., 1-1, 1-2, 1-3, etc., or 2-2, 2-3, etc.) result in the elimination of the attacking piece or pieces. Counterattacks, such as 3-2, are not allowed. The defender must withdraw from a 2- attack or be eliminated.

OBJECT AND BASIC STRATEGY A player wins by eliminating all of his opponents pieces that are on the board at any time. The fact that the loser may still have some unentered pieces does not save him from defeat.

The basic strategy for each player is to safely connect his two artillery pieces and thereby obtain his most effective weapon for eliminating his opponent. A player must also use his ability to grasp the important features.

and peculiarities of terrain for each selected board in order to achieve the stated objective.

1 have described what I believe to be the best embodiment of my invention. What I desire to cover by letters patent, however, is set forth in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. Playing equipment for a board game comprising, in combination,

a. two identical sets of varied playing pieces differentiated, as by color, each set composed of distinguishable pieces having different, arbitrarily assigned capabilities and limitations characteristic of their identities, and laterally aligned, b. a random playing board composed of b,. a foundation board having a playing area divided into identical major squares which form a definite and permanent pattern, and

b a multiplicity of square tiles of identical size each adapted to be fitted into any one of the major squares of the foundation board, each tile having an unmarked back and a face whose entire area is divided into smaller playing squares, with some of the tiles including more playing squares of a first color than of a second color, others of the tiles including more playing squares of the second color than of the first color, and still others including equal numbers of playing squares of the two colors, the last mentioned group including some in which playing squares of the same color are diagonally aligned, and others in which playing squares of the same color are laterallyaligned, the tiles being at least sufficient in number to fill all the squares of the foundation board.

2. Playing equipment for a board game as set forth in claim 1 in which each playing square occupies essentially one-fourth of the area of a tile.

3. Playing equipment for a board game as set forth in claim 1 in which the number of major squares on the foundation board and the number of tiles are identical.

4. Playing equipment for a board game as set forth in claim 1 in which the playing area of the board consists of thirty-seven major square tile spaces, consisting of three central rows of seven major squares each, two opposite side rows of five major squares each, and two opposite terminal rows of three major squares each, the arrangement being symmetrical and corresponding to the above description when considered heightwise or widthwise.

5. Playing equipment for a board game as set forth in claim 1 in which the tiles are so designed that the total number of playing squares of the first color is equal to the total number of playing squares of the second color.

6. Playing equipment as set forth in claim 1 in which there are sixteen tiles having two playing squares of a first color and two playing squares of a second color with playing squares of like color disposed diagonally opposite one another, eleven tiles having two playing squares of the first color and two playing squares of the second color, with playing squares of like color side by side, five tiles having one playing square of the first color and three playing squares of the second color, and five tiles having one playing square of the second color and three playing squares of the first color.

7. Playing equipment as set forth in claim 1 in which the foundation board includes expansive comer and marginal coplanar areas for the accommodation of unentered playing pieces, and the playing area is uniformly sunk with respect to such coplanar areas, except that the major squares are separated from one another by narrow ribs which are substantially flush with said corner and marginal areas.

UNITED shirts OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECHQN Pate NO, 5,799,5 9 Dated March 26,197u

- MICHAEL A. LAKER, ET AL lnven-tofls) It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 5, claim '1 ,line 7, cancel "laterally aligned".

Signed and sealed this 15th day of August 197a.

(SEAL) Attest:

McCOY M, GIBOSN, JRo C. MARSHALL DANN ttesting Officer Commissioner of Patents USCIOMM-DC 60376-P69 Y U,S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: I969 0-366-334,

F ORM PO-OSO (10-69)

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4079941 *Mar 10, 1976Mar 21, 1978Joseph MoralesBoard game
US4173347 *Jun 25, 1976Nov 6, 1979Field Ernest R IiGame board and pieces having removable indicia
US4535994 *Apr 21, 1983Aug 20, 1985Cowan William PBoard game apparatus
US4625971 *Aug 28, 1984Dec 2, 1986Ferguson Jack ACrossword puzzle educational game
US5351965 *Sep 10, 1993Oct 4, 1994Telfer Stephen JApparatus for playing a board game
US9340982Mar 5, 2014May 17, 2016Columbia Insurance CompanyPatterned tiles and floor coverings comprising same
US9534398Apr 22, 2016Jan 3, 2017Columbia Insurance CompanyPatterned tiles and floor coverings comprising same
US9622609Mar 2, 2012Apr 18, 2017Columbia Insurance CompanyPattern carpet tiles and methods of making and using same
US20070045952 *Aug 23, 2006Mar 1, 2007Jones Cory HInteractive game including partially concealed game pieces
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/261, 273/282.1, 273/284
International ClassificationA63F3/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00176
European ClassificationA63F3/00B1