Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3800432 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 2, 1974
Filing dateAug 16, 1971
Priority dateAug 20, 1970
Publication numberUS 3800432 A, US 3800432A, US-A-3800432, US3800432 A, US3800432A
InventorsHamada S, Miyata T, Ogawa T, Watanabe S
Original AssigneeFuji Photo Film Co Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Photo-sensitive sheet drying apparatus
US 3800432 A
Abstract
An improvement of a photo-sensitive sheet drying apparatus having upper and lower conveyor belts arranged lengthwise in the parallel relationship. The apparatus has means to drive these conveyor belts at equi-speed in one direction, thus assuring the smooth transportation of photo-sensitive sheets in the course of the drying operation without the curled end of the wet sheet catching when dried.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Pateni Miyata et al. Apr. 2, 1974 [54] PHOTO-SENSITIVE SHEET DRYING 3,369,306 2/1968 Evans 34/162 APPARATUS 3,434,225 3 1969 Knibiehly... 34/160 3,405,456 10/1968 Shepherd 34/155 lflvemorsl Tomlflkl y ShmJl Ramada; 3,328,895 7/1967 Krone et al. 34 68 Shigenobu Watanabe; Toshiko 3,199,213 8/1965 Milligan 01. a]. 34/13.8 Ogawa, all of Kanagawa-ken, Japan 3,071,866 1/1963 Mangus 34/73 n 1,560,579 11 1925 Jones 1 34/155 Asslgneei FIlJl ShaShIn1 Fllm Kabushlkl Kalsha, 1,426,095 8 1922 Parker 34/155 Ashlgarakaml-gun, Kanagawa-ken, J an FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 742,858 2/1952 Germany 1. 34/155 [22] 1971 288,139 6/1929 Great Britain 34/162 [21] App]. No.: 172,100

Primary Examiner-Meyer Perlin 30 Foreign Application priority m Assistant ExaminerPaul Devinsky Aug. 20, 1970 Japan 45-72923 [57] ABSTRACT [52] US. Cl 34/151, 34/155, 34/152 51 Int.C1. ..1F26b13/10 A"mPmVePemofaphcto'senstvesheedrymgap' [58] Field 61 Search 34/155, 162, 151, 152, Params havmg and belts ranged IengthWiSe in the parallel relationship. The ap- 198/'165.271/45 paratus has means to drive these conveyor belts at equi-speed in one direction, thus assuring the smooth f hoto-sensitive sheets in the course [56] References Cited transportailon 0 p UNITED STATES PATENTS of the drying OIL-12110 without the curled end of the wet sheet catching when dried. 3,681,853 8/1972 Reid 34/151 3,440,944 4/1969 Endermann et a1. 34/155 8 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures PAIENIEDAPR 2 m4 3800.432

- sum 1 or 2 ezagg mm PATENIEB APR 2 74 SHEET 2 0F 2 PIC-3.5

1 PHOTO-SENSITIVE SHEET DRYINGHAPPARATUS This invention relates to an apparatus for drying wet photo-sensitive sheets, and more particularly to a dryer of the type using a conveyor means against which the wet photo-sensitive sheet is pushed by a stream of gas blowing onto the sheet to dry thesame.

The automatic transporting type photo-sensitive sheet drying apparatus which is commonly used comprises a roller conveyor. The photo-sensitive sheet tends to curl in the course of the drying operation because of the difference in the thermal elongations of a relatively thick gelatine coating on one surface of a film base sheet and a relatively thin gelatine coating on the other surface of the film base, and when the curled end of the photo-sensitive sheet is caught in the conveyor, it will turn aside from the passageway, defined by the conveyor, and therefore cannot be carried further.

The automatic transporting type dryer which is also commonly used, comprises two parallel belt conveyors between which the photosensitive sheet is closely gripped. This dryer will not allow the photo-sensitive sheet to curl, and therefore it can convey the photosensitive sheet which has a strong inclination to curl when dried. However, the wet photo-sensitive sheet cannot be dried evenly, and the pattern of stripe traces of the belt remains on the photo-sensitive sheet after it has been dried, thus deteriorating the appearance or image quality of the photo-sensitive sheet.

A dryer of the type to which this invention relates, comprises upper and lower conveyors. The photosensitive sheet is pushed against one of these conveyors by a stream of drying gas and is carried by said one conveyor. When the wet photo-sensitive sheet is dried, the fore and/or rear end of the sheet will curl increasingly until the curled end of the sheet touches the surface of the lower conveyor belt and is caught in the conveyor, thus preventing the sheet from further travelling or causing the following sheet to reach and overtake the retarded sheet.

The object of this invention is to provide a photosensitive sheet drying apparatus capable of smoothly transporting the photo-sensitive sheet which will tend to curl while it is subjected to the drying operation, and of drying the sheet without deteriorating the appearance or picture quality thereof.

This object has been attained by the drying apparatus according to this invention which comprises upper and lower conveyors moving at equi-speed in one direction and transporting the photo-sensitive sheet, which exists between the upper and lower conveyors and is pushed against one of these conveyors by a stream of drying gas blowing from a perforated plate through the other conveyor.

The term conveyor used hereinafter, indicates a belt type conveyor, a roller type conveyor and other conveyors of any type.

This invention will be better understood from the following description which is made with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 shows one embodiment of this invention having upper and lower conveyor belts of a material capable of air passage;

FIG. 2 shows another embodiment having upper and lower conveyor belts both consisting of an arrangement of staggered rollers;

FIG. 3 depicts a different embodiment whose upper and lower conveyors consist of an air-passing belt and an arrangement of rollers respectively;

FIG. 4 shows an embodiment similar to that shown in FIG. 3, but the upper conveyor thereof consists of an arrangement of staggered rollers whereas the lower conveyor consists of an air-passing belt;

FIG. 5 is a plan view of a air-passing belt;

FIG. 6 is a plan view of an arrangement of staggered rollers; and

FIG. 7 shows an embodiment of this invention whose air-passing plate has a number of air holes slanting with respect to the travelling direction of the conveyor.

Referring to FIG. 1, the upper and lower conveyors l1 and 12 of the apparatus each consists of an airpassing belt. These conveyors move at equi-speed in the same direction.

The photo-sensitive sheet 3 is pushed against the upper conveyor belt 7 by a stream of drying gas passing through the lower conveyor belt 8. The fore and rear ends of the photo-sensitive sheet 3 curl increasingly with the progress of the drying operation until the curled ends of the sheet 3 have touched the surface of the lower belt 12, travelling with the conveyors l1 and 12.

More specifically, the stream of air from a fan 4 is heated after passing through a heat source 5 and then the warm air stream blows from numerous air holes 6 through the lower conveyor belt 8, thus pushing the photo-sensitive sheet 3 against the upper conveyor belt 11. Then, the photo-sensitive sheet 3 can be carried by the upper belt conveyor 11. In the course of the drying operation the fore and rear ends of the sheet curl increasingly until the ends of the sheet have been brought in close contact with the lower conveyor belt 12 which travels at the same speed and in the same direction as the upper conveyor belt 11. Thus, the photo-sensitive sheet will not be caught in the conveyor and it will be smoothly carried without being lowered in the quality of its appearance or image.

In FIG. 2, the upper and lower conveyors 21 and 22 consist of an arrangement of numerous staggered rollers 13. A stream of air from a fan 4 is heated by a heater 5, and then the warm air blows from numerous air holes 6 to pass through the lower conveyor 22 to the photo-sensitive sheet 3 which is pushed against the upper conveyor 21, and is carried by the same. The fore and/or rear ends of the sheet will curl increasingly in the course of drying until the curled end of the sheet touches on the surface of the lower conveyor. This, however, will cause no trouble because the lower conveyor 22 travels at the same speed and in the same direction as the upper conveyor 21. Otherwise, the curled end of the sheet will be caught in the lower conveyor. As a result, the sheet will be put aside from the passage, or it will be retarded and finally the following sheet will reach and overtake the retarded sheet. As a matter of course, this will cause malfunction in the dryer. Advantageously, the degree of curling will be suppressed somewhat by the upward stream of air to cause the curled end of the sheet to rise.

In FIG. 3 the upper conveyor 31 consists of an airpassing belt whereas the lower conveyor 32 consists of an arrangement of staggered rollers. In FIG. 4 the upper conveyor 41 consists of an arrangement of staggered rollers whereas the lower conveyor 42 consists of an air-passing belt. In these embodiments, similar to others shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, a stream of warm air passes through the lower conveyor belt and dries the wet photo-sensitive sheet while pushing the same against the upper conveyor belt.

The air-passing belt suitable for use in the apparatus of this invention consists of a net of a cellulose or a synthetic resin as shown in FIG. 5. Alternatively a plurality of strings stretched in the same direction as the travelling direction of the photo-sensitive sheet can be used. The belt can be made ofa porous substance which must be thermostable at the temperature of 1 C.

The arrangement of numerous staggered rollers is shown in FIG. 6. The staggering arrangement prevents the curled end of the photo-sensitive sheet from protruding from the space between the adjacent rods to which the rollers are fixed.

The use of air holes slanting with respect to the travelling direction of the photo-sensitive sheet as shown in FIG. 7 assures a smooth stream of air along the underface of the sheet without fluttering the sheet, and therefore such slant holes are useful in positioning the sheet in place. In other words, the slant holes will not cause the distortion in the stream of air which would take place in striking against the sheet in the normal direction and flowing along the surface of the sheet in the opposite directions.

What is claimed is:

l. A photo-sensitive sheet drying apparatus comprising:

a. a first conveyor means which is permeable to a stream of gas;

b. a second conveyor means vertically spaced apart from said first conveyor means, said first and second conveyor means being lengthwise parallel to each other;

c. means for simultaneously moving said first and second conveyor means in the same direction and at equal speeds, said first and second conveyor means being capable of guiding between them a photosensitive sheet; and

d. means for supplying and directing a stream of gas through said first conveyor means towards said second conveyor means, said first and second conveyor means being spaced such as to enable only the ends of the sheet to touch said first conveyor means while an intermediate portion of the sheet contacts the second conveyor means when there has been sufficient drying to cause curling of the sheet.

2. A photo-sensitive sheet drying apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said first conveyor means comprises a reticulate belt.

3. A photo-sensitive sheet drying apparatus according to claim 1 wherein both of said conveyor means comprise an arrangement of staggered rollers.

4. An apparatus according to claim 1 wherein one of said conveyor means comprises a reticulate belt whereas the other conveyor means comprises an arrangement of staggered rollers.

5. An apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said means for directing a stream of gas comprises a perforated plate having numerous air holes normal to the travelling direction of said conveyor means.

6. An apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said means for directing a stream of gas comprises a perforated plate having numerous holes slanting in the travelling direction of said conveyor means.

7. An apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said stream of gas is sufficient to force a wet, photosensitive sheet against said second conveyor means.

8. A photo-sensitive sheet drying apparatus according to claim 1 wherein at least said second conveyor means comprises a crosswise staggered arrangement of disc roller elements.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1426095 *Oct 18, 1920Aug 15, 1922Albert H ParkerDrier for drying coated paper
US1560579 *Nov 23, 1923Nov 10, 1925Eastman Kodak CoSuction conveyer for sheet material
US3071866 *Sep 14, 1959Jan 8, 1963Miami Herald Publishing CompanHigh speed photographic print drying machine
US3199213 *Jul 12, 1961Aug 10, 1965Crown Zellerbach Canada LtdMethod of changing the moisture content of wood
US3328895 *Apr 30, 1964Jul 4, 1967Donnelley & Sons CoWeb dryer
US3369306 *Mar 28, 1966Feb 20, 1968Singer Cobble LtdConveyors
US3405456 *Jun 16, 1967Oct 15, 1968Taylor Publishing CoFilm dryer
US3434225 *Sep 5, 1967Mar 25, 1969Logetronics IncDrier for film processors
US3440944 *Feb 12, 1965Apr 29, 1969Keuffel & Esser CoProcess and apparatus for the development of photocopying material
US3681853 *Mar 15, 1971Aug 8, 1972Pako CorpDryer for sheet material
*DE742858A Title not available
GB288139A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4084806 *Nov 10, 1976Apr 18, 1978Eastman Kodak CompanySheet handling apparatus
US4106767 *Dec 13, 1976Aug 15, 1978G.A.O. Gesellschaft Fur Automation Und Organisation MbhConveyor system for flat articles
US4142301 *Oct 17, 1977Mar 6, 1979Ciba-Geigy AgMethod and apparatus for drying photographic material
US4181420 *Dec 29, 1977Jan 1, 1980Hoechst AktiengesellschaftDevelopment device for developing sheets of diazo copying material
US4441806 *Mar 8, 1982Apr 10, 1984The Mead CorporationDocument exposure apparatus
US5183251 *Jul 5, 1990Feb 2, 1993Sardella Louis MConveyor system and feeding sheets
US5261146 *Apr 2, 1992Nov 16, 1993Isover Saint-GobainCreping machine
US5390428 *Jun 30, 1993Feb 21, 1995Eastman Kodak CompanyFilm transport means for use in a film dryer
US5504271 *Feb 25, 1992Apr 2, 1996Carnaudmetalbox PlcOven
US5567481 *Jan 25, 1995Oct 22, 1996Yu; Tom Y.Apparatus and method for coating and drying paper sheets
US5815763 *Mar 24, 1997Sep 29, 1998Noritsu Koki Co., Ltd.Conveying apparatus for photosensitive material
US6813846 *Mar 27, 2002Nov 9, 2004Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.Drying device
US7526878 *Sep 25, 2007May 5, 2009Fujifilm CorporationMethod and apparatus for drying coating film and method for producing optical film
US8573764 *Dec 7, 2010Nov 5, 2013Canon Kabushiki KaishaDrying apparatus and printing apparatus
US20110164101 *Dec 7, 2010Jul 7, 2011Canon Kabushiki KaishaDrying apparatus and printing apparatus
DE2747013A1 *Oct 19, 1977Apr 27, 1978Ciba Geigy AgVerfahren und einrichtung zum trocknen fotografischen materials
WO1992014979A1 *Feb 25, 1992Sep 3, 1992Cmb Foodcan PlcAn oven
WO1994011689A1 *Jul 22, 1993May 26, 1994Randy HendricksonPaper sheet coating apparatus with gas streams drying
Classifications
U.S. Classification34/620, 271/195
International ClassificationF26B13/20, F26B15/18, B65H20/10, F26B15/12, G03D15/02
Cooperative ClassificationF26B15/12, F26B15/18
European ClassificationF26B15/12, F26B15/18