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Publication numberUS3800715 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 2, 1974
Filing dateFeb 28, 1973
Priority dateSep 30, 1971
Publication numberUS 3800715 A, US 3800715A, US-A-3800715, US3800715 A, US3800715A
InventorsW Boller
Original AssigneeW Boller
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bomb recovery and shield apparatus
US 3800715 A
Abstract
Bomb recovery and shield apparatus includes a cage shaped to slip over a bomb, and a clip in the cage adapted to engage the bomb and retain it inside the cage. A lead line attached to the cage is used to pull the bomb into an explosion-resistant, open-ended tubular shell. A lid having a shrapnel-capturing wire rope screen covers the top opening of the shell. A post extending above the top opening of the shell supports a pulley, and the lead line is reeved over the pulley prior to its attachment to the cage. A workman standing a safe distance from the bomb pulls the lead line to slip the cage over the bomb and thereafter guides the bomb toward the shell. The bomb is guided into the opening at the bottom of the shell by a guide system in the shell which includes a second pulley attached to a ring and detent pin releasably supported in the bottom of the shell. The lead line passes through the interior of the shell and is reeved over the second pulley. A fixed lead rod extends lengthwise through the interior of the shell, and the ring of the detent pin is disposed around the lead rod. The bomb and cage are drawn into the open bottom of the shell, and continued pulling on the lead line causes the detent pin and ring to release from their support and slide lengthwise upwardly along the guide rod, thereby allowing the bomb to be guided safely along the guide rod into the interior of the shell.
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United States Patent Boller 3,800,715 Apr. 2, 1974 BOMB RECOVERY AND SHIELD APPARATUS William A. Boller, 1455 Enderly Way, Mountain View, Calif. 94087 [22] Filed: Feb. 28, 197-3 [21] Appl. No.: 336,612

Related US. Application Data [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 185,301, Sept. 30,

1971, Pat. NO. 3,721,201.

[76] Inventor:

[52] [1.8. Cl. 109/495, 89/36 R, 109/1 R [51] int. Cl. E06b 9/00, E05g 3/00 [58] Field of Search 109/495, 58.5, 58, 49,

109/85, 1 R, 102/22; 89/36 R, 36 D, l R; 214/1 1), 294/67 DA, 67 C, 67 D, 67 DB, 67 E, 92, 93, 75 H; 86/] OTHER PUBLICATIONS This Week Magazine Section of the Sunday Star, Aug. 12, 1951, Washington, DC. "m

Primary ExaminerDennis L. Taylor Attorney, Agent, or FirmChristie, Parker & Hale [57] ABSTRACT Bomb recovery and shield apparatus includes a cage shaped to slip over a bomb, and a clip in the cage adapted to engage the bomb and retain it inside the cage. A lead line attached to the cage is used to pull the bomb into an explosion-resistant, open-ended tubular shell. A lid having a shrapnel-capturing wire rope screen covers the top opening of the shell. A post extending above the top opening of the shell supports a pulley, and the lead line is reeved over the pulley prior to its attachment to the cage. A workman standing a safe distance from the bomb pulls the lead line to slip the cage over the bomb and thereafter guides the bomb toward the shell. The bomb is guided into the opening at the bottom of the shell by a guide system in the shell which includes a second pulley attached to a ring and detent pin releasably supported in the bottom of the shell. The lead line passes through the interior of the shell and is reeved over the second pulley. A fixed lead rod extends lengthwise through the interior of the shell, and the ring of the detent pin is disposed around the lead rod. The bomb and cage are drawn into the open bottom of the shell, and continued pulling on the lead line causes the detent pin and ring to release from their support and slide lengthwise up wardly along the guide rod, thereby allowing the bomb to be guided safely along the guide rod into the interior of the shell.

22 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures PATENTEU APR 2 I974 SHEET 2 BF 3 BOMB RECOVERY AND SHIELD APPARATUS CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION This is a continuation-in-part of my copending application Ser. No. 185,301, filed Sept. 30, 1971, now US. Pat. No. 3,721,201.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The invention relates to public safety equipment, and more particularly to a remote-controlled system for moving a bomb to the inside of an explosion-proof shield that prevents serious injury if the bomb subsequently explodes.

The recent increase in militant bombings has made it necessary to develop devices for aiding policemen, firemen, and the like in recovering potentially explosive bombs and removing them in such a way that serious injury does not occur if the bomb explodes. Generally speaking, most militant pipe bombs are low-order explosives in which an explosion propels deadly shrapnel in a multiplicity of directions at supersonic velocities. In high-order" explosives, the explosion occurs with such force that the pipe is virtually annihilated, creating essentially no shrapnel of any substantial mass. However, the pressure and temperature generated within the pipe by a high-order explosive can approach 3,000,000 psi at 2,000l(. The persons responsible for removing a bomb must always assume that the bomb may be activated without warning by a timer, or set off by a triggering device, such as a mercury switch, in response to slight movement of the bomb. Thus, extreme care must be used in handling all bombs.

The prior art systems for handling potentially explosive bombs unfortunately require the workman to be dangerously close to the bomb, and usually require him to make physical contact with the bomb. In some prior art procedures, the operator works from behind a protective shield stationed relatively close to the bomb. The inherent danger in this procedure is the strong chance the operator will be struck by shrapnel ricocheting around or even penetrating the shield if the bomb explodes. Worse still is the danger that the percussion from the shock wave of detonation will injure or kill him despite the shield because of this proximity (usually within or feet) to the uncovered bomb.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention provides a remote controlled system for the safe handling and disposal of militant bombs.

Briefly, the invention includes a shell having an explosion-resistant body, and an explosive-capturing cage shaped to slip over the bomb and adapted to retain the bomb inside it. Guide means secured to the cage are controlled to slip the cage over the bomb to pick it up and provide guided movement of the bomb to the interior of the shell for safe disposal. Preferably, the interior of the shell is large enough to provide an air insulation gap (at least two to three times the diameter of the bomb) between the bomb and the inner wall of the shell.

In a preferred form of the invention, an elongated post is secured to the body of the shell. The guide means includes an elongated line having one end secured to the cage, and a pulley secured to a portion of the post supported above the open end of the shell. The lead line is reeved over the pulley, with its other end extending to a point remote from the shell and cage. Thus, the operator can handle the bomb from a safe distance by pulling on the line to slip the cage over the bomb and guide the cage and bomb in one continuous and quick motion to the inside of the shell.

In one form of the invention, the top opening of the shell is covered by a shrapnel-capturing open mesh wire rope screen to allow the escape of gas if an explosion occurs. In another form, the lid can be suitably spaced from the top of the shell to provide an adequate gas escape.

Preferably, the bomb is guided into an open bottom of the shell by guide apparatus in the shell including a second pulley attached to a ring and detent pin supported inside the shell adjacent its bottom opening. The lead line passes through the interior of the shell and is reeved over the second pulley prior to its attachment to the explosive-capturing cage. A fixed lead rod extends lengthwise through the interior of the shell, and the detent pin ring is disposed around the lead rod. In use, the lead line is pulled to move the bomb and cage into the open bottom of the shell until the end of the lead line engages the second pulley. Continued pulling of the lead line thereafter releases the ring and detent pin from their support, and allows the ring to slide lengthwise upwardly along the guide rod. The bomb and cage follow the ring and are thereby guided safely into the interior of the shell.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS These and other aspects of the invention will be more fully understood by referring to the following detailed description and the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is an elevation view showing a tubular bomb shield;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view showing a bomb pickup device for slipping over a bomb and moving it to the inside of the bomb shield;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view showing a wheel cart for carrying the bomb shield;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view showing the bomb recovery and shield apparatus in use recovering a bomb;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary sectional perspective view showing an alternate embodiment of the tubular bomb shield;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary sectional elevation view showing an alternate embodiment of the lid covering the bomb shield;

FIG. 7 is an exploded elevation view showing a system for guiding the bomb into the interior of the bomb shield;

FIG. 8 is a plan elevation view taken on line 88 of FIG. 7; and

FIG. 9 is an enlarged elevation view of the apparatus shown within the circle 9 of FIG. 7.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring to FIG. 1, a bomb shield or blast tube" 10 includes a tubular, open-ended shell 12. Preferably, the shell has relatively thick walls made of a rigid, high strength material such as steel. The shell ideally has walls which are about 1% inches thick so the shell is capable of withstanding explosions caused by low order and propellant explosives and common high order explosives. Preferably, the shell is made from a gun barrel casing having an interior large enough to enclose the type of pipe bombs which are commonly encountered during use.

During normal use, the shell stands upright on feet 14 secured to the bottom angular lip of the shell by suitable means such as welding. Outwardly projecting cylindrical handles 16 are welded to opposite sides of the shell outer wall.

An elongated upright post 18 is welded to the upper annular lip of the shell. The top of the post carries an outwardly extending, horizontal boom 20 projecting over the hollow interior of the shell. Preferably, the boom is located about 2 /2 feet above the top of the shell. The boom supports a downwardly extending eye 22 positioned centrally over the hollow interior of the shell.

A lid 24 is mounted to pivot about a point on the upper lip of the shell. Lid 24 includes a ring-shaped metal body 25 having a size matching that of the tubular shell. The opening in the lid is covered by an open mesh screen 26 preferably made of woven wire rope. The end portions of the wire ropes extend through separate holes (not shown) drilled through the lid and project below an annular shoulder 27 formed in the inner periphery of the bottom annular lip of the lid. Each end of the wire rope is swaged below shoulder 27 to firmly hold the wire ropes in place. The wire ropes are shaped and interwoven to form the hemispherical open mesh netting illustrated best in FIG. 1.

A similar hemispherical shaped open mesh netting 28 made of woven wire rope covers the opening at the bottom of the shell. The ends of the bottom wire ropes extend through holes (not shown) drilled through an annular lip 29 extending inwardly into the interior of the shell at its bottom. The ends of the wire rope below shoulder 27 are swaged to hold the wire ropes in place.

A bore 30 extends through the body of the lid, with a narrowed lower portion 31 of post 18 extending up through bore 30 so the lid pivots from an open position shown in FIG. 1 to a closed position covering the opening at the top of the shell. The narrowed part of the post forms a shoulder immediately above the upper lip of the lid to prevent the lid from sliding axially on the post.

A spacer 32 between the upper lip of the shell and the bottom of the lid provides a narrow annular space between the lid and the top of the shell when the lid is closed. The purpose of this space will be described in detail below. A downwardly projecting lug 34 on the side of the lid opposite its pivotal connection acts as a support for the opposite side of the lid when it is closed.

A pair of upwardly projecting steel locking dogs 36 are welded to opposite sides of the shell outer surface so as to extend above the upper lip of the shell. Preferably, dogs 36 are spaced 120 apart with one being 30 from post 18. Each dog has a respective shoulder 38 projecting inwardly toward the opening in the shell and positioned so that the lid makes a relatively tight friction fit under the dogs when the lid is closed.

A third steel locking dog 39 welded to the outer surface of the lid projects downwardly below the lid. Locking dog 39 has an inwardly projecting shoulder 40. When the lid is closed shoulder 40 makes a sliding tit in a notch 42 formed in the outer surface of the shell. Preferably, notch 42 is spaced 120 from each steel dog 36, so that the lid is locked at three equidistantly spaced points when closed.

An upwardly projecting eye 44 is welded to the upper annular lip of lid 24. The purpose of the eye will be described in detail below.

FIG. 2 shows a bomb pickup device or cage 46 for use in conjunction with blast tube 10. Pickup device 46 comprises a skeleton framework which includes a U- shaped base frame 48. The ends of several longitudinally spaced apart, downwardly opening hoop segments 50 are secured to the parallel legs of base frame 48, one hoop segment being secured to the open end of the U, and a pair of other hoop segments being secured to intermediate portions of the U. An inverted V-shaped end piece 51 is secured above the cross-piece of the U at the other end. A longitudinally extending bar 52 is rigidly fixed to the tops of the hoop sections and the apex of the end piece. A relatively stiff elongated steel leaf spring or bomb retainer clip 56 secured to the underside of the hoop segment above the open end of the U projects downwardly and rearwardly into the interior portion of the pickup device.

Alternatively, the skeleton framework may be modifled in a suitable manner to support an open-ended bag (not shown) or other similar receptacle for slipping over the bomb.

The use of the blast tube 10 and bomb pickup device 46 is best understood by referring to FIGS. 3 and 4. Blast tube 10 preferably is transported to the site of the bomb on a wheel cart 58. The wheels of the wheel cart preferably are those from a motorcycle, and include hand brakes (not shown) for controlling movement of the cart so that one man can operate it. The blast tube hangs in the wheel cart by handles 16 which rest in upwardly opening stirrups or gimbal hangers 60 secured to the sides of the cart frame. The wheel cart has an elongated handle (not shown) secured to a rear crosspiece 62 of the frame for wheeling the blast tube to the bomb site. The handle also may have an extension (not shown) adapted for towing the wheel cart behind a vehicle. Other equipment for removing the bomb (to be described in detail below), together with bomb pickup device 46, may be carried in hand by a workman or secured by suitable means to the wheel cart frame.

A bomb 64 is approached by a workman (not shown), usually wearing a conventional protective suit. The workman pushes the wheel cart to a point close to the bomb, say ten to fifteen feet from the bomb. The wheel cart is tipped forward, using its handle, to release the blast tube from engagement with gimbal hangers 60 to set the blast tube on the ground adjacent to the bomb. (Alternatively, the blast tube can remain on the cart during use. This mode of operation will be described in further detail below.)

After the blast tube is placed adjacent to the bomb, lid 24 is pivoted to its fully open position illustrated in FIG. 4. An elongated bomb position control tension line 66 passing through a swivel pulley 68 is releasably secured to the pickup device, preferably by a clip 69 at the end of the line attached to another line 70 which forms a yoke for attachment to the pickup device. The yoke has snap ring fasteners 72 to releasably clip tension line 66 to the pickup device. Swivel pulley 68 is releasably clipped by suitable fastening means to eye 22 on the boom of post 18, so that tension line 66 extends from the pickup device, through the pulley, to a point remote from the bomb site. A lid position control tension line 74 is releasably secured to eye 44 on the lid by a snap ring fastener 76 fitted through the eye.

Tension lines 66 and 74 are preferably 150 feet to 200 feet long, and each line is wound on a separate spool (not shown) or the like to facilitate ease of handling' during the preliminary stages of the bomb recovery. Both tension lines are then strung out to a safe position. Alternatively, the lines are played out ahead of time from the remote position, preferably by a second workman, as the other workman wheels cart 58 to the bomb recovery site. This latter method is quick and substantially prevents the chance of pulling line 66 too 'soon' while unwinding. a 7

Bomb pickup device 46 is placed on the ground adjacent to the bomb, on the side of the bomb opposite the blast tube, with the longitudinal axis of the pickup device being aligned approximately with that of the bomb. The size of the pickup device is such that the lateral distance between the longitudinal legs of base frame 48 is less than the diameter of the bomb. Thus, when tension line 66 is pulled, the pickup device slips over the bomb, with the longitudinal legs of the base frame being closely spaced from the adjacent sides of the bomb.

The bomb pickup device initially can be placed next to the bomb by the workman in charge of the bomb recovery. However, if there is a likelihood that the bomb contains a timing device, which makes approaching the bomb extremely dangerous, the pickup device may be placed on the ground at a safe distance from the bomb. Thereafter, tension line 66 can be pulled, while standing in another safe position, to guide the bomb pickup device over the bomb. Alternatively, device 46 can be placed over bomb 64 by hand without disturbing the bomb.

As the tension line 66 is guided to pull the pickup device over the bomb, spring steel clip 56 is urged upwardly from its original position (shown in phantom line in FIG. 41) by its contact with the bomb. Thus, the clip exerts a downward force on the top of the bomb to retain the bomb within the pickup device. After the bomb is inside the pickup device, tension line 66 is pulled to immediately move the bomb from its position on the ground to the edge of the blast tube, then being raised to a position (not shown) hanging directly above the opening to the blast tube. At this point, clip 69 at the end of the tension line engages pulley 68 and thereby acts as a stop to limit further pulling of the tension line. (A scoop device (not shown) may be used in conjunction with the blast tube to aid guiding the pickup device up the side of the tube.) The operator then slackens tension line 66 to lower the bomb into the blast tube.

During movement of the bomb, end piece 51 prevents the bomb from slipping out the end of the pickup device. The bomb will not slide out the opposite end of the device because the cap of the bomb catches on the end of spring clip 56, and the longitudinal legs of base frame 48 are spaced sufficiently close to each other to prevent the bomb from slipping out the bottom of the pickup device,

As shown in FIG. 4, an upwardly opening cloth bag 78 or other similar receptacle may be hung in the upper portion of blast tube 110 to receive the bomb and hold it in the center of the blast tube so as to maintain an air insulation gap between the bomb and the inner wall of the tube. Preferably, the blast tube is of a size that provides an air gap of at least two to three times the diameter of the bomb. Bag 78 may be secured to the blast tube by various suitable means, such as screws 79, which releasably attach the top of the bag to the upper lip of the tube.

When the bomb is safely inside the tube, the operator pulls on tension line 74 to pivot the lid to its closed position under the locking dogs. Locking dogs 39 on the lid acts as a stop by abutting against the side of the blast tube as its lower shoulder engages notch 42. This indicates to the operator that the lid of the blast tube is completely closed. The space between the lid and upper lip of the'blast tube allows line 66 to remain attached to the bomb when the lid is closed. Thus, line 66 may be used later to aid in removing the bomb from the shell.

Thus, with the bomb safely inside the blast tube, the operator can approach the blast tube with substantially reduced risk of injury. Flying shrapnel from an explosion of a propellant or low-order explosive will be retained inside the tube by wire rope top 26 and bottom 28. High pressure gas resulting from an explosion is controlled because it vents through the open mesh top and bottom. In an explosion caused by a high-order explosive, the open mesh top and bottom allow controlled ventilation of resultant gaseous particles. The upper portion of the wire rope top and bottom usually will separate by severing during such an explosion, but tests have shown that the swaged end portions of the wire rope maintain a secure connection to the lid and bottom of the blast tube. Since the wire rope remains intact with the tube, it does not create shrapnel, and in any event, even if separated from the top, it has no sub stantial mass, shape, or direction to inflict much injury, if any. The wire rope members that become severed are easily replaced by interweaving new ones with the remaining members. The spherical configuration of the top and bottom makes replacement of the wire rope members a relatively easy task.

After the bomb is disposed in the blast tube, the wheel cart may be used to pick up the blast tube and transport the bomb away from the recovery site.

It is recognized that certain modifications of the above-described bomb recovery and shield apparatus may be made without departing from the scope of the invention. For example, the blast tube may be modified in such a way that the pickup device and bomb are drawn through the opening at the bottom of the tube. In this instance, the feet 14 and wire rope screen 28 at the bottom of the tube are modified to swing open to gether to allow bottom access and remote closing capability. The post 18 can be shortened so that swivel pulley 68 is positioned immediately above the opening at the top of the tube, with the lid being bolted in its closed position. Thus, lid position control tension line 74 may be eliminated from the top but used on the bottom.

In using this modification of the blast tube, the operator pushes the Wheel cart and blast tube to a position close to the bomb. The blast tube remains mounted on the cart, with the cart being positioned so that the bottom of the blast tube is spaced sufficiently above the ground to provide clearance for pulling the pickup device through the opening in the bottom of the tube. After the wheel cart and blast tube are properly positioned, the pickup device and tension line 66 are extended down through the hollow interior of the tube and out the bottom of the tube. After the pickup device is aligned properly with the bomb, the operator pulls on tension line 66 to slip the cage over the bomb and engage spring clip 56 with the bomb. Thereafter, as the tension line is pulled the bomb is drawn into the open bottom of the blast tube to a position safely inside the tube. Line 74 is used to close the bottom lid. The bomb can be lowered to rest on the bottom lid, or the tension line may be secured to post 18, boom 20, or to a suitable place on the cart, or the handle of the cart. This will hold the bomb inside the blast tube as it is transported by the wheel cart from the recovery site.

Various modifications of the post and boom also may be developed without departing from the scope of the invention. For example, the post or boom may be rotatable to allow the bomb to be picked up clear of the blast tube, with continued pulling of the tension line rotating the post or boom against a stop (not shown) to position the bomb directly over the opening in the blast tube. Another possible modification of the post and boom to accomplish the same function would be a telescoping boom (not shown) with the tension line being pulled along the longitudinal axis of the boom.

FIG. shows a modified blast tube 80 which includes a metal tubular inner shell 82 disposed concentrically inside a metal tubular outer shell 84, with an annular void 86 being formed between the inner and outer shells. An upper perforated ring 88 is rigidly secured to the upper edges of the inner and outer shells so as to cover the top of the annular void. Similarly, a lower perforated ring 90 is rigidly secured to the bottom edges of the inner and outer shells to cover the bottom of the annular void.

One of the purposes of blast tube 80 is to provide a device capable of shielding the blast from a high-order explosive, while reducing the overall weight of the device sufficiently so it can be more easily handled by a single workman. Preferably, the wall thickness of inner tubular shell 82 is about one inch, and the wall thickness of outer tubular shell 84 is about A inch. Both shells preferably are constructed of steel, the preferred source of the shells being standard oil well drill casing. Blast tube 80 provides about a 25 lbs. to 50 lbs. reduction in weight when compared with a blast tube having a wall thickness of from 1% inches to 2 inches.

Annular void 86 is filled with an energy-absorbing medium, such as water (as shown in FIG. 5). Because of the reduced wall thickness of the blast tube, the energy-absorbing medium is used to dissipate energy escaping through the wall of the inner shell from an explosion in the blast tube. Separate corks 92 are releasably disposed in the perforations of upper and lower rings 88 and 90 to contain the energy-absorbing medium within the annular void. In the event a substantial amount of energy is absorbed by the water during an explosion, the corks will separate from their respective perforations to provide further means for dissipating the energy.

The annular void may be filled with a variety of energy-absorbing media, such as plastic foam, expanded metal such as honeycomb metal, balsa wood, sand, and the like.

The interior surface of the inner shell 82 is lined with a removable layer of insulation 94, which also covers and seals the bottom opening of the inner shell. During use of blast tube 80, a source of liquid nitrogen (shown schematically at 96) is delivered to the bomb site. After the bomb is moved to the inside of the blast tube, the interior of the tube is filled with liquid nitrogen by a pump 97 which forces the liquid nitrogen through a line 98 leading from liquid nitrogen source 96, at a point remote from the bomb, to the interior of the blast tube. The purpose of the liquid nitrogen is to freeze the bomb to deactivate the explosive material contained in it. Moreover, if the bomb is activated by a triggering device powered by batteries, for example, the liquid nitrogen freezes all chemical activity in the batteries and thereby prevents the bomb from being activated.

Other temperature-reducing media may be used in place of the liquid nitrogen, but liquid nitrogen is preferred because of its relatively low cost, chemical stability, and effectiveness in deactivating explosives. Preferably, insulation 94 is a foam insulation material, such as polystyrene. The purpose of the insulation is to prevent the steel inner shell 82 from contacting the liquid nitrogen which could lower the temperature of the steel sufficiently to make it brittle and thereby reduce its explosion-resistant characteristics. The insulation also reduces evaporation of the liquid nitrogen. Other insulation materials may be used, without departing from the scope of the invention, as long as they are capable of providing a good temperature insulation barrier between the interior of the blast tube and inner shell 82.

In the event a bomb is heavily insulated, the freezing process may not be effective to deactivate the bomb. However, the presence of the blast tube itself obviously will prevent serious injury in the event the bomb explodes.

FIG. 6 shows a modified form of the blast tube in which the opening at the top of the tube is covered with a downwardly opening oversized metal lid 100. The lid has a bottom annular rim 102 which is spaced laterally from the side of the blast tube, the underside of the lid being spaced from the top of the blast tube by vertical support legs 104 resting on the upper lip of the tube. The lid swings to the side by means of a suitable hinge 106 at its side. The blast tube also has an identical hinged lid 108 at the bottom, the hinge at the bottom allowing lid 108 to open in the event the bomb is drawn through the bottom of the tube. Both lids provide an escape path for venting gas, as represented by the arrows in FIG. 6.

In using the blast tube of FIG. 6, lid swings open by means of a remote controlled tension line (not shown) such as line 74, so that recovered bomb may be loaded through the top of the blast tube. To allow loading through the bottom of the tube, lid 100 includes an opening 110 in its top throughwhich line 66 passes. Each lid includes suitable remote controllable locking means (not shown), such as locking dog 39 and notch 42, located on the side of the tube opposite the hinge.

FIGS. 7 through 9 illustrate a system for safely guiding the bomb and pickup cage into the interior of the shell. This system includes an alternate shell or blast tube 112 having an open top and bottom, and an annular top 114 and open mesh wire rope screen 1 16 similar to lid 24 attached by bolts 117 in a fixed position over the open top of the shell. The bottom of the blast tube remains open.

The bottom of the shell includes a pair of fixed legs 118 and an adjustable leg 120 having a tilt bolt 122. During use, the blast tube 112 is transported to the bomb site on wheel cart 58 (shown in FIG. 3), and prior to capturing the bomb the handle of the cart is placed on the ground to elevate and tip the bottom of the blast tube. Alternatively, the tube can be placed on the ground and the tilt bolt 122 may be adjusted to fix the blast tube in its desired orientation.

The shrapnel-capturing top 11 1 has a pair of circumferentially spaced apart, upwardly extending fixed legs 124, and a pulley post 126 also acting as a leg. It will be shown below that the bomb preferably is drawn into the open bottom of the blast tube during use. However, should the operator determine that a suspect device may be safely picked up physically, he can invert the blast tube to allow for an open top configuration. This procedure is accomplished preferably by setting the tube off cart 58 and inverting the tube, using legs 124 and 126 as handles.

The bomb and cage are led into the interior of blast tube 112 by a guide system which includes a pulley 128 attached to pulley post 126 above the top of the blast tube, and a bottom pulley 130 inside the tube adjacent its bottom opening. The bottom pulley is attached to a ring 132 which, in turn, is fastened to an upright detent pin 134i releasably secured to the top of a support 136 fixed to the bottom annular lip of the blast tube and projecting inwardly toward the center of the blast tube. The bottom pulley and its support are located on the side of the blast tube immediately opposite top pulley 128. This configuration is illustrated best in FIG. 8 which shows the top pulley located I80 from the position of the bottom pulley.

Lead line 66 is reeved over top pulley 128, and then passes through the wire mesh screen, and lengthwise through the interior of the blast tube, prior to being reeved over the bottom pulley 130. The end of the tension line carries a clip (not shown). A yoke (not shown) attached to cage 46 is fixed to the clip.

An elongated guide rod 13% bent into a slight S- shaped configuration extends lengthwise through the interior of the tube. The top of the guide rod if fixed to pulley post 126, and the bottom of the guide rod is threaded through ring 132 prior to being attached to support 136.

in using the guidesystem, the lead line is pulled to draw the bomb and cage slowly into the open bottom of the blast tube until the line offers resistance when the clip at the end of the line engages bottom pulley 1130. Continued pulling of the lead line releases detent pin 1341 from its attachment to support 136. Thereafter, the bomb may be guided safely into the interior of the blast tube via ring 132 which is free to slide lengthwise upwardly along guide rod 138. The guide system thus allows the bomb and cage to enter the blast tube through the bottom opening thereof, while preventing the bomb or cage from striking the blast tube, which could otherwise jar the bomb sufficiently to cause it to explode, or catch on the bottom of tube 112.

Once the bomb and cage are safely inside the blast tube, lead line 66 can be secured by means of an attachment M to the. blast tube shown best in FIG. 9. The attachment includes a horizontally disposed sup port base 142 attached to the top of a bracket 144, the bottom of which is fixed to the annular rim of top 114. Bracket 144 projects radially outwardly and upwardly from the blast tube to hold the support base in a remote position above top 114.

A cam-action jam cleat M6 is secured to the top of base 142. The base also supports a guide 148 through which lead line 66 is threaded prior to entering the top of the blast tube.

In using attachment 140, once the bomb is safely inside the blast tube, the operator walks slowly toward the blast tube holding the lead line taut until the lead line can be locked by an in-and-down motion in jam cleat 146.

The bomb is then ready to be transported to a bomb disposal site by wheel cart 58. At the disposal site, the lead line may be remotely released from the jam cleat. The explosive-capturing device then is lowered as far as possible, and the cart either driven, walked away, or pulled away by means of another long rope, leaving the explosive-capturing device on the ground. The operator then approaches the device. There is a drawstring at the back of the bag which encloses the capturing device. The drawstring is loosened to allow the operator to open the rear of the bag. The explosive-capturin g device then is jerked from the bomb by the line at a safe distance from the bomb. This movement leaves the suspect bomb exposed.

Thus, the bomb recovery and shield apparatus of this invention provides the following advantages:

l. The operator of the apparatus does not come into contact with the bomb;

2. There is only a short time lag from the time the bomb is moved to the time the bomb is safely inside the blast tube;

3. The movement of the bomb into the blast tube is done remotely; and

4. The entire bomb recovery system may be operated by one person.

I claim:

1. Apparatus for moving a bomb and shielding its explosion, the apparatus comprising a shell having an explosion-resistant body with a hollow interior and at least one open end, a cage shaped to fit around the bomb and adapted to retain the bomb inside it, and a guide system for moving the cage around the bomb and providing guided movement of the cage and the bomb through the open end of the shell to its interior, the guide system including an elongated tension line secured to the cage, an elongated guide rod in the interior of the shell, and a guide attached to the guide rod and coupled with the tension line, the tension line extending to a point remote from the shell from where it can be shortened to draw the bomb and cage toward the shell, the tension line cooperating with the guide and guide rod to provide guided movement of the bomb safely through the open end of the shell into the interior of the shell so that the bomb and cage can be led into the shell without substantial contact between the cage or bomb and the shell.

2. Apparatus according to claim 1 in which the guide rod is held in a fixed position in the shell, and in which the tension line is reeved over a sheave engaged with the guide rod.

3. Apparatus according to claim 2 in which the sheave is slidably engaged with the guide rod.

4. Apparatus according to claim 3 in which the sheave is releasably mounted adjacent the open end of the shell, the sheave being attached to a ring which is slidably disposed on the guide rod.

ill

5. Apparatus according to claim 2 in which the shell is a substantially tubular body having an open top and an open bottom, and in which the tension line extends through the open top of the shell, lengthwise through the interior of the shell, and out the open bottom of the shell for attachment to the cage, and in which the sheave is engaged with the guide rod at a point near the open bottom of the shell so that the bomb and cage can be led through the open bottom of the shell via the tension line without substantial contact between the cage or bomb and the shell.

6. Apparatus according to claim 5 in which the sheave is slidably engaged with the guide rod.

7. Apparatus according to claim 6 in which the sheave is releasably mounted adjacent the open end of the shell, the sheave being attached to a ring which is slidably disposed on the guide rod.

8. Apparatus according to claim 7 including a second sheave disposed near the open top of the shell for providing guided movement of the tension line during use.

9. Apparatus according to claim 1 including attachment means fixed to a point exterior of the shell for releasably securing the tension line in a fixed position relative to the shell.

10. Apparatus according to claim 6 in which the guide rod extends from a point adjacent the bottom inner wall of the shell upwardly and inwardly toward the longitudinal axis of the shell.

ll. Apparatus according to claim 5 including an open mesh wire rope screen covering the open top of the shell.

12. A bomb shield comprising a shell having an explosion-resistant exterior wall and a hollow interior, means forming an opening into the hollow interior, means providing a gas escape path from the hollow interior to the exterior of the shell, and a guide system in the shell for providing guided movement of an explosive device through the opening of the shell to its interior, the guide system including an elongated tension line secured to a device for retrieving the explosive device, an elongated guide rod in the interior of the shell, and a guide attached to the guide rod and coupled with the tension line, the tension line extending to a point remote from the shell from where it can be shortened to draw the explosive device toward the shell, the tension line cooperating with the guide and guide rod to provide guided movement of the bomb safely through the open end of the shell into the interior of the shell without substantial contact between the explosive device and the shell.

13. Apparatus according to claim 12 in which the guide rod is held in a fixed position in the shell, and in which the tension line is reeved over a sheave engaged with the guide rod.

14. Apparatus according to claim H3 in which the sheave is slidably engaged with the guide rod.

15. Apparatus according to claim 14 in which the sheave is releasably mounted adjacent the open end of the shell, the sheave being attached to a ring which is slidably disposed on the guide rod.

16. Apparatus according to claim 13 in which the shell is a substantially tubular body having an open top and an open bottom, and in which the tension line extends through the open top of the shell, lengthwise through the interior of the shell, and out the open bottom of the shell for attachment to the device for retrieving the explosive, and in which the sheave is engaged with the guide rod at a point near the open bottom of the shell so that the explosive can be led through the open bottom of the shell via the tension line without substantial contact between the explosive and the shell.

17. Apparatus according to claim 16 in which the sheave is slidably engaged with the guide rod.

18. Apparatus according to claim 17 in which the sheave is releasably mounted adjacent the open end of the shell, the sheave being attached to a ring which is slidably disposed on the guide rod.

19. Apparatus according to claim 18 including a second sheave disposed near the open top of the shell for providing guided movement of the tension line during use.

20. Apparatus according to claim 12 including attachment means fixed to a point exterior of the shell for releasably securing the tension line in a fixed position relative to the shell.

21. Apparatus according to claim 17 in which the guide-rod extends from a point adjacent the bottom inner wall of the shell upwardly and inwardly toward the longitudinal axis of the shell.

22. Apparatus according to claim 16 including an open mesh wire rope screen covering the open top of the shell.

mg UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION April 2, 1974 Patent No. 0,715 Dated lnvent flx) William A. Boiler It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

F On Title Page, item [76] change "William A. Boller, 1455 .1

Enderly Way, Mountain View, Calif. 94087" to William A. Boller, 1455 Enderby Way, Sunnyvale, Calif. 94087 Signed and sealed this 17th day of September 1974.

(SEAL) Atteet:

IMQCOY M. GIBSON JR. C. MARSHALL DANN Arresting Officer Commissioner of Patents mg UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION April 2, 1974 Patent No. 0,715 Dated lnvent flx) William A. Boiler It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

F On Title Page, item [76] change "William A. Boller, 1455 .1

Enderly Way, Mountain View, Calif. 94087" to William A. Boller, 1455 Enderby Way, Sunnyvale, Calif. 94087 Signed and sealed this 17th day of September 1974.

(SEAL) Atteet:

IMQCOY M. GIBSON JR. C. MARSHALL DANN Arresting Officer Commissioner of Patents 53 3 4 UNITED STATES RATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,800,715 Dated pril 2, 1974 fli) William A. Boiler It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

T On Title Page, item [76] change "William A. Boller, 1455 Enderly Way, Mountain View, Calif. 94087" to William A.

Boller, 1455 Enderby Way, Sunnyvale, Calif. 94087 Signed and sealed this 17th day of September 1974.

(SEAL) Attest:

MCCOY M. GIBSON JR. C. MARSHALL DANN attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents

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Classifications
U.S. Classification109/49.5, 89/36.1, 109/1.00R, 86/50
International ClassificationF42D5/00, F42B39/00, F42B39/14, F42D5/045
Cooperative ClassificationF42B33/067, F42B39/14, F42D5/045
European ClassificationF42B33/06F, F42B39/14, F42D5/045