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Publication numberUS3801010 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 2, 1974
Filing dateDec 11, 1972
Priority dateNov 9, 1970
Publication numberUS 3801010 A, US 3801010A, US-A-3801010, US3801010 A, US3801010A
InventorsJ Hruby
Original AssigneeRain Jet Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Low profile fountain assembly
US 3801010 A
Abstract
An ornamental fountain assembly includes a nozzle support housing which defines an internal chamber. Water inlet duct means communicate with the chamber. The chamber has a height along a vertical axis of the assembly which is at least equal to the diameter of the duct means adjacent the chamber. The chamber has a cross-sectional area in planes normal to the axis which is at least twice the effective water flow area of the duct means adjacent the chamber. A fountain nozzle is carried by the housing coaxially of the chamber and communicates with the chamber through the upper boundary thereof. The nozzle has a liquid inlet opening of area less than the cross-sectional area of the chamber. Liquid flow controlling and directing means are associated with the path of the water flow through the chamber from the opening of the inlet duct means to the chamber to the inlet of the nozzle. The liquid flow controlling and directing means are proportioned and arranged for causing liquid flowing along the path at the nozzle inlet to have an essentially axial flow characteristic and an essentially uniform liquid flow pattern. The flow controlling and directing means include the above-mentioned proportioning of the chamber relative to the inlet duct means and the nozzle inlet areas; this means also includes vertically disposed perpendicularly intersecting baffle members in the chamber arranged symmetrically about said axis.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Hruby, Jr. I

[4 1 *Apr. 2, 1974 [54] LOW PROFILE FOUNTAIN ASSEMBLY [75] Inventor: John O. Hruby, J11, Burbank, Calif.

[73] Assignee: Rain Jet Corp., Burbank, Calif.

[ Notice: The portion of the term of this patent subsequent to Dec. 12, 1989,

has been disclaimed.

[22] Filed: Dec. 11, 1972 21 Appl. No.: 313,989

Related U.S. Application Data [63] Continuationin-part of Ser. No. 306,528, Nov. 15, 1972, and a continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 87,886, Nov. 9, 1970, Pat. No. 3,705,686.

Primary Examiner-M. Henson Wood, Jr. Assistant ExaminerJohn J. Love Attorney, Agent, or FirmChristie, Parker & Hale 7 [57] ABSTRACT An ornamental fountain assembly includes a nozzle support housing which defines an internal chamber. Water inlet duct means communicate with the chamher. The chamber has a height-along a vertical axis of the assembly which is at least equal to the diameter of the duct means adjacent the chamber. The chamber has a cross-sectional area in planes normal to the axis which is at least twice the effective water flow area of the duct means adjacent the chamber. A fountain nozzle is carried by the housing coaxially of the chamber and communicates with the chamber through the upper boundary thereof. The nozzle has a liquid inlet opening of area less than the cross-sectional area of the chamber. Liquid flow controlling and directing means are associated with the path of the water flow through the chamber from the opening of the inlet duct means to the chamber to the inlet of the nozzle. The liquid flow controlling and directing means are proportioned and arranged for causing liquid flowing along the path at the nozzle inlet to have an essentially axial flow characteristic and an essentially uniform liq uid flow pattern. The flow controlling and directing means include the above-mentioned proportioning of the chamber relative to the inlet duct means and the nozzle inlet areas; this means also includes vertically disposed perpendicularly intersecting baffle members in the chamber arranged symmetrically about said axis.

8 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures m mgmrn 21974 $801,010

sum 1 nr 2 LOW PROFILE FOUNTAIN ASSEMBLY CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS This application is a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 87,886 filed Nov. 9, 1970, issued as U.S. Pat. No. 3,705,686 on Dec. 12, 1972, and also of application Ser. No. 306,528, filed Nov. 15, 1972.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to ornamental fountains or the like having upwardly discharging liquid discharge nozzles. More specifically, the invention pertains to a fountain nozzle support base useful in shallow fountain pools.

2. Description of the Prior Art U.S. Pat. No. 3,705,686, of which this application is a continuation-in-part, describes several fountain nozzle support bases which are arranged to cause water flowing from an internal chamber of the base to the inlet of a nozzle supported by the base to have an essentially laminar liquid flow characteristic. The support bases described in the patent are also arranged'so that the water entering the nozzle has a uniform liquid flow pattern. These characteristics in the water entering the nozzle are desirable so that the base may be used to advantage with any one of a number of fountain nozzles, each of which is arranged to operate on water introduced to it in a particular manner to produce a characteristic aesthetically appealing effect in the discharge pattern of water emerging from the nozzle. The fountain discharge pattern may be comprised of aerated water or non-aerated water, or a combination of aerated and non-aerated water streams.

In general, the fountain nozzles produced by the owner of this application, as well as by other manufacturers of fountain nozzles, are designed and arranged with reference to water supplied to the nozzle through a coaxially aligned supply pipe of indefinite length. Water so supplied to the nozzle has an essentially laminar flow characteristic and has a uniform liquid flow pattern, as these terms are defined hereinafter. In practice, however, it is rare that the fountain nozzle will be mounted to a coaxially aligned pipe of extended length, with the result that the fountain nozzle does not perform in use in the manner intended by the manufacturer.

The fountain bases described in U.S. Pat. No. 3,705,686 are useful to provide the desired flow characteristics in water presented to the nozzle in situations which wouldotherwise result in gross departure from these desired characteristics in the water flow to the nozzle. The support bases described in this patent, as a practical matter, are relatively high structures which are used to best advantage only in relatively deep fountain pools and the like. In any fountain installation, it is desirable, for best aesthetic effect both during periods when the fountain is in use and in periods when the fountain is not operated, that minimum structure project above the surface of the fountain pool. Accordingly, it is desirable that the fountain support base and as much of the nozzle as. possible be submerged within the fountain pool. The relatively great height of the support bases described in the above-mentioned patent makes those support bases unsuitable for use in shallow fountain pools where the best aesthetic effect is desired.

As used herein, the terms uniform liquid flow rate and uniform liquid flow pattern mean that the liquid velocity profile taken in any radial plane through the nozzle inlet, or adjacent to the nozzle'inlet, is the same whether the liquid flow characteristic be laminar or turbulent. Where the water introduced into the nozzle has a uniform liquid flow pattern, the flow rate of the water along one side of the nozzle is the same as the flow rate along any other portion of the nozzle duct at the same location radially from the nozzle axis.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The fountain bases according to the present invention produce the desired essentially laminar axial flow characteristic and uniform liquid flow pattern in water supplied to fountain nozzles supported by the base. The present bases are of low height, and therefore are useful in relatively shallow fountain pools where support bases of the type described in U.S. Pat. No. 3,705,686 cannot be used for best aesthetic effect.

Generally speaking, this invention provides an ornamental fountain assembly which includes a nozzle suport housing defining therein a chamber. Water inlet duct means communicate with the chamber. The chamber has a height along a vertical axis of the assembly which is at least equal to the diameter of the duct means adjacent the chamber. The chamber has a crosssectional area in planes normal to this axis which is at least twice the effective water flow area of the duct means adjacent the chamber. The fountain nozzle is carried by the housing coaxially of the chamber and communicates with the chamber through an upper boundary of the chamber. The nozzle has a liquid inlet opening of area less than the cross-sectional area of the chamber. Liquid flow controlling and directing means are associated with the path of water flow through the chamber from theopening of the inlet duct means to the chamber to the inlet of the nozzle. The flow controlling and directing means are proportioned and arranged for causing liquid flowing along the path at the nozzle inlet to have an essentially axial flow characteristic and an essentially uniform liquid flow pattern. The flow controlling and directing means include the above-mentioned proportioning of the chamber relative to the inlet duct means and nozzle inlet areas. The flow controlling and directing means also include vertically disposed, perpendicularly intersecting baffle members located in the chamber and disposed symmetrically about the assembly axis.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The above-mentioned and other features of this invention are more fully set forth in the following detailed description of two presently preferred embodiments of the invention, which description is presented with reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a cross-sectional elevation view of a first embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a view taken along line 2-2 in FIG. 1; and

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional elevation view of another embodiment of the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE ILLUSTRATED EMBODIMENTS A fountain assembly -(see FIGS. 1 and 2) includes a support base 11 for a fountain nozzle 12. The base is composed of a body 13 and a top annular closure plate 14 which are secured together by a plurality of through-bolts 15 and corresponding nuts 16, the through-bolts passing entirely through the cover plate and body, as illustrated. The through-bolts and their associated nuts are disposed at regular intervals about the circumference of the base, which preferably is of right circularly cylindrical configuration. A chamber 17 is formed within body 13 and preferably is of right circularly cylindrical configuration concentric about an axis 18 of the fountain. The chamber opens to the top surface of the body but is closed by the top plate which has an outlet opening 19 formed therein concentric to axis 18.

At least, one inlet duct is provided to the chamber through its side walls. As shown in FIG. 1, in fountain 10 two coaxially aligned diametrically opposed inlet ducts are provided in base 11, and these ducts are provided in the form of corresponding ones of a pair of connection nipple tubes 19 which have their outer ends disposed outside the base for connection to suitable water supply conduits. Preferably, as shown, the nipples are disposed so that they are traversed diametrically by corresponding ones of through-bolts 15; the through-bolts serve to retain the nipples within body 13 and also to modulate the flow of water through the nipple into chamber 17.

Nozzle 12 has an open lower inlet end 20. The nozzle is mounted to base 11 so that the inlet end of the nozzle communicates with chamber 17 via opening 19. The mounting of the nozzle to the base is so arranged that the nozzle is disposed coaxially of chamber 17. The structure of the nozzle per se is not an element of this invention, and workers skilled in the art to which this invention pertains will readily appreciate that any of the fountain nozzles, including nozzles of the rotary pendulum type, disclosed in previously issued patents owned by the assignee of this invention may be used, as desired, in fountain 10.

A baffle assembly 22 is disposed within chamber 17, and partially within the lower extent of nozzle 12, for distributing within chamber 17 the water which enters the chamber through the inlet openings to the chamber. The baffle assembly is arranged so that, as the water flows from the chamber to the open lower end of nozzle 12, the water possesses a uniform liquid flow pattern and flows essentially axially of the nozzle with an essentially laminar flow characteristic. Baffle assembly 22 is composed of a pair of perpendicularly oriented, inverted T-shaped baffle plates 23 and 24. The leg 25 of each baffle plate has a width corresponding to the inner diameter of the body 26 of nozzle 12. The laterally extending arms 27 of each T are disposed in chamber 17, as shown. The leg 25 of each baffle plate extends as far as practicable along the body of the nozzle from its open lower end. As shown best in FIG. 2, the line of intersection of baffle plates 23 and 24 corresponds with fountain axis 18, and one of the battle plates 23 is coincident with the line along which connection nipples 19 are coaxially aligned.

Preferably, as shown in FIG. 1, the baffle assembly has its lower extent spaced at short distance above the floor 28 of chamber 17. Also, it is preferred that the outer edges 29 of the arms 27 of the baffle plates be spaced somewhat from the side walls of the chamber, and that arm edges 29 be connected to the side edges of the leg 25 of each baffle plate by an edge 30 which is inclined upwardly and inwardly relative to nozzle axis 18. In this manner, an equalizing channel 31 is provided in chamber 17 circumferentially of the baffle assembly.

Support base 11 includes water flow controlling and directing means associated with the path of water flow from inlet nipples 19 to the inlet opening of nozzle 12 for causing water entering the inlet opening of the nozzle to have an essentially axial flow characteristic and an essentially uniform liquid flow pattern. This liquid flow controlling and directing means is provided in part by baffle assembly 22. The proportioning of the dimensions and configuration of chamber 17 relative to the water flow areas of nipples l9 and the nozzle inlet opening are also aspects of the liquid flow controlling and directing means of base 11.

It is preferred that the total height of base 11 be as small as possible to enable the base to be used with very shallow pools such as fountain pool 35, shown in FIG. 1; it is desired that base 11 and as much of nozzle 12 as possible be submerged below the surface 36 of the fountain pool during use of fountain 10. To achieve these ends, chamber 17 has as large a diameter as possible, and has a total cross-sectional area in planes perpendicular to axis 18 which is substantially greater than the aggregate area of the water inlet openings to the chamber. A large cross-sectional area of chamber 17, relative to the total water inlet opening area to the chamber, assures that the velocity of water entering the chamber through nipples 19, for example, will be substantially reduced within the chamber. Such a velocity reduction reduces the tendency of water to swirl both within the chamber and as it enters into the inlet opening of nozzle 12, thereby assuring to the greatest extent possible that the water entering into the nozzle flows parallel to the axis of the nozzle and has an essentially laminar flow characteristic.

It has been found that the cross-sectional area of chamber 17 in planes perpendicular to axis 18 should be at least twice the total water inlet area to the chamber, and preferably four or more times greater than the inlet area to the chamber. Also, the cross-sectional area of the chamber in planes perpendicular to axis 18 should be substantially greater than the area of the inlet opening to the nozzle which is supported by the base. Also, the height of the chamber should be at least equal to, and preferably greater than, the diameter of any one of the inlet openings to the chamber. As a general rule, for best practice of this invention, as the height of the chamber is reduced, the diameter of the chamber should be increased.

As will be apparent from a comparison of the structures shown in FIGS. 1 and 3, this invention comprehends that the inlet openings to the chamber may be formed either through the side walls of the chamber or through the bottom of the chamber. Where the chamber water inlet openings are formed through the side walls of the chamber, one, two or four such openings may be provided. Regardless of the number of openings provided to chamber 17, each opening should be centered in a plane of one of the baffle plates so that the baffle plate operates on water entering the chamber from the adjacent inlet opening to divide the water flow into two equal parts.

Especially where only a single inlet opening is provided to chamber 17, it is desired that equalization flow channels be provided around the circumference of baffle assembly 22 within the chamber to assure that the water entering nozzle 12 has the desired uniform liquid flow pattern. The presence of equalization flow channels around the circumference of baffle assembly 22 is also desired in multi-inlet bases according to this invention where the flow rate through any one inlet opening can vary relative to the flow rate through the other inlet openings, as where the water flow to one or more plural inlet openings is separately valved. On the other hand, where two or four water inlet openings are provided to the chamber and the inlet openings are so connected to a source of water that no differential flow rates can exist between the several inlet openings, then baffle plates 23 and 24 may be configured to intimately engage the bottom, side and top surfaces of chamber 17.

Another fountain 40 according to this invention is illustrated in FIG. 3. Fountain 40 includes an axial-flow, low profile, flow-regulating support base 41 for a suitable fountain nozzle such as nozzle 12. As in fountain 10, a cruciform flow modulating and equalizing baffle assembly 22 cooperates with the lower portions of nozzle body 26 and with an internal chamber 42 formed within a body 43 of the base. A water inlet opening 44 is provided through the floor 45 of chamber 42 and is aligned coaxially of a nozzle axis 47 about which chamber 42 is concentric. A conventional bolting flange 48 is carried by the lower exterior surface of base 41 concentrically about inlet opening 45 to adapt the base to be connected to the externally threaded upper end of a riser nipple 49 which extends a short distance above the floor 50 of fountain pool 35. Preferably, as shown in FIG. 3, the upper extent of inlet opening 45 is belled or flared.

In fountain 40, baffle assembly 22 cooperates with the proportioning and arrangement of chamber 42 to provide water flow controlling and directing means within the base for assuring that water entering the inlet end of nozzle 12 flows axially within the nozzle body with an essentially laminar flow characteristic and has an essentially uniform liquid flow pattern. As with chamber 17 of fountain 10, chamber 42 of fountain base 41 is proportioned and arranged with respect to the cross-sectional area of both the water inlet opening to the chamber and the nozzle inlet opening area. Accordingly, chamber 42 has a cross-sectional area in planes perpendicular to axis 47 which is at least twice the effective flow area of inlet opening 45, and preferably is at least four or more times greater than the inlet opening area. Also, as shown in FIG. 3, the crosssectional area of the chamber in planes perpendicular to axis 42 is substantially greater than the inlet opening of the nozzle which is supported by the base.

In an axial-flow, low profile base according to this invention, it is desired that baffle assembly 22 be arranged so that the bottom, side and top surfaces of the arms 27 of baffle plates 23 be spaced from the adjacent surfaces of chamber 42, thereby to provide flow equalizing water circulation paths within the chamber about the circumference of the baffle assembly. These equalizing flow paths are desired about the circumference of the baffle assembly because, conventionally, riser nippie 49 extends directly upwardly from an elbow located essentially immediately below the floor 50 of the fountain pool. The presence of an elbow close to the upper end of riser nipple 49 causes the water flowing through inlet opening 45 to have a non-uniform liquid flow pattern, which flow pattern is modulated by the proportioning of chamber 42, in cooperation with baffle assembly 22, into a uniform liquid flow pattern at the inlet opening to the nozzle supported by base 41.

Workers skilled in the art to which this invention pertains will readily appreciate that modifications and alterations may be made to the structures of the two embodiments described above without casting aside or departing from the teachings of this invention. Accordingly, the foregoing description should not be regarded as limiting the scope of this invention.

What is claimed is:

1. An ornamental fountain assembly comprising a nozzle support housing defining therein a chamber, a water inlet duct means communicating with the chamber, the chamber having a height along a vertical axis of the assembly which is at least equal to the diameter of the duct means adjacent the chamber, the chamber having a cross-sectional area in planes normal to said axis which is at least twice the effective water flow area of the duct means adjacent the chamber, a fountain nozzle carried by the housing coaxially of the chamber and communicating with the chamber through the upper boundary thereof, the nozzle having a liquid inlet opening of area less than said cross-sectional area of the chamber, and liquid flow controlling and directing means associated with the path of water flow through the chamber from the opening of the inlet duct means to the chamber to the inlet of the nozzle and proportioned and arranged for causing liquid flowing along the path at the nozzle inlet to have an essentially axial flow characteristic and an essentially uniform liquid flow pattern, said means including the aforesaid proportioning of the chamber relative to the inlet duct means and nozzle inlet areas and vertically disposed perpendicularly intersecting baffle members in the chamber symmetrical about said axis.

2. A fountain assembly according to claim 1 wherein the inlet duct means are defined through the side walls of the chamber.

3. A fountain assembly according to claim 2 wherein the inlet duct means comprises a plurality of openings to the chamber through the side walls thereof at locations spaced uniformly about the axis.

4. A fountain assembly according to claim 3 wherein each chamber inlet opening is aligned with a baffle member.

5. A fountain assembly according to claim 1 wherein the baffle members extend in the chamber laterally from the nozzle opening.

6. A fountain assembly according to claim 5 wherein the baffle members have edges disposed proximate to but spaced from the adjacent surfaces of the chamber.

7. A fountain assembly according to claim 1 wherein the inlet duct means to the chamber comprises a water inlet opening formed through the bottom of the chamber concentric to said axis.

8. A fountain assembly according to claim 1 wherein the baffle members extend through the nozzle inlet opening.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US477824 *Dec 26, 1890Jun 28, 1892 Reducer and nozzle for hose
US3486700 *Dec 14, 1967Dec 30, 1969L N B CoNozzle
US3705686 *Nov 9, 1970Dec 12, 1972Rain Jet CorpFlow controlling support base for ornamental fountains
CH293636A * Title not available
GB496231A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4889283 *Aug 22, 1988Dec 26, 1989Wet Enterprises, Inc.Apparatus and method for stream diverter
US5161740 *Oct 4, 1990Nov 10, 1992Kuykendal Robert LPop jet fountain
US5718379 *Sep 18, 1996Feb 17, 1998Air-O-Lator CorporationLow profile fountain
US5904295 *Jun 16, 1997May 18, 1999Kuykendal; Robert L.Pop jet fountain
US20120180730 *Jul 12, 2011Jul 19, 2012Radio Systems CorporationUniversal Water Fountain System for Animals
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/17, 239/590.5
International ClassificationF21S8/00, B05B17/08
Cooperative ClassificationF21W2121/02, B05B17/08
European ClassificationF21S8/00, B05B17/08
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Aug 16, 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: RAIN JET CORP., 27671 LAPAZ RD. LAGUNA NIGUEL, CA.
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:IRRIGATION ENGINEERING AND MANUFACTURING CO., BY: JOHN DREW; JOHN O. HRUBY, JR. ; GERALD W. FRASIER, PARTNERS;REEL/FRAME:004026/0088
Effective date: 19820719