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Publication numberUS3801108 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 2, 1974
Filing dateFeb 28, 1973
Priority dateFeb 28, 1973
Publication numberUS 3801108 A, US 3801108A, US-A-3801108, US3801108 A, US3801108A
InventorsG Murray
Original AssigneeG Murray
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golfer{40 s wrist-release detector
US 3801108 A
Abstract
A device for measuring relatively, the point at which a golfer releases the cock of his wrists in his downswing, so that judgement can be made whether his release is premature thus having an adverse effect on his swing. It is a device for use by golfers in training to detect wrist movement through relative measurement of swing radius. The device may include a mat having indicia thereon for properly positioning a golfer relative one or more horizontally extending light beams adapted to function as detectors. If the golfer keeps his wrists fully cocked until after the clubhead passes a selected point, the radius of the circular path of the clubhead will remain small enough for the clubhead to pass inside a light beam, without triggering an alarm associated with the beam.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 1111 3,801,108

Murray Apr. 2, 1974 GOLFER'S WRIST-RELEASE DETECTOR Primary ExaminerGeorge J. Marlo [76] Inventor: Gerald F. Murray, 45-15 42nd St.,

Sunnyside, N.Y. 11104 57 ABSTRACT [22] Filed: 1973 A device for measuring relatively, the point at which a [21] APPL 33 42 golfer releases the cock of his wrists in his downswing, so that judgement can be made whether his release is premature thus having an adverse effect on his swing. [52] Cl 273/186 273/195A 273/187 A It is a device for use by golfers in training to detect [51] Illt. Cl A63b 69/36 wrist movement through relative measurement of [58] held of Search 273/186 26 swing radius. The device may include a mat having in- 273/191, 192 dicia thereon for properly positioning a golfer relative one or more horizontally extending light beams [56] References C'ted adapted to function as detectors. If the golfer keeps UNITED STATE PATENT his wrists fully cooked until after the clubhead passes 720,406 2/1903 Clifford 273/186 R a Selected p the radius of the circular p of the 2,571,974 10/1951 Walker 273/186 R clubhead will remain small enough for the clubhead to 2,985,452 5/1961 Trippet 273/26 R pass inside a light beam, without triggering an alarm Heard R X associated the beam 3,350,102 10/1967 Tiernan 273/l86 R X 5 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures PATENTED APR 2 I974 mokomhmo Nm wumnow 1 GOLFER'S WRIST-RELEASE DETECTOR BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The close observation of a good golfers swing will show that he keeps his wrists fully cocked until his hands have almost reached their bottommost point in the downswing, almost directly over the ball, and it is not until this point is reached that he releases his wristcock, thereby increasing the angle between his forearm toward to the target and his golf club. This manner of swinging a golf club retains centrifugal force built up in the golfers hands until that force reaches its peak, at which point it is released into the golf club by means of the golfer releasing his wrist-cock, thereby causing the clubhead to whip down into the ball much like the snapping of a whip. Premature release of wrist-cock permits the centrifugal force to be released before it has built up to its maximum point in the hands, and consequently the golf club receives less force, thereby causing it to swing through the ball at less speed, resulting in loss of distance covered by the driven ball.

Accordingly it is desirable for a golfer to know, while practicing, if he is keeping his wrists fully cocked until his hands have almost reached a point directly over the ball in his downswing, and, if not, then approximately at what point in his downswing he is releasing his wristcock. It is a basic object of this invention to provide a device for use by the golfer to detect his wrist-cock release.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will in part be obvious and in part appear hereinafter.

The invention is based on the fact that the path of a clubhead which is being swung with the wrists fully cocked describes a smaller circle than one being swung with the wrists extended, or uncocked. This can be more readily seen when the following facts are considered: The center of the circular path of the clubhead described by a right-handed golfer is in his left shoulder; the radius of this circle is from the left shoulder to the head of the club; at the same time, this radius is also one side of a triangle, with the left arm and the club being the remaining two sides. As the wrists uncock, the angle between the left arm and the club increases, thereby increasing the length of the side opposite that angle, or the radius of the circle. Thus, by uncocking the wrists, the head of the club moves further away from the golfers left shoulder.

Accordingly, by placing an indicating device such as an electric eye sensor beam at a point immediately beyond, or outside the circular path which would be taken by a clubhead when it is being swung with the wrists fully cocked, and at the point along that path which the golfer has selected to be his personal point of release, he can tell when he swings whether or not has kept his wrists fully cocked up to that point by whether or not the clubhead passes through and triggers the sensor beam.

In other words, if he keeps his wrist fully cocked until after the clubhead passes the selected point, the radius of the circular path of the clubhead will remain small enough for the clubhead to pass inside the beam. without triggering it. On the other hand, if he releases his wrist-cock prematurely the radius of the circular path will increase thereby causing the clubhead to be cast outward and pass through the sensor beam, setting off an indicator, and transmitting a signal to the golfer.

As to the placement of the beam, rather than use a mobile device adjustable to the various points along the clubhead path which may be selected by different golfers as being their own personal point of release, this-invention utilizes a stationary device located at the point of latest release possible for good contact with the ball. As will be shown below, the fact that it is stationary does not limit its capabilities since it may still be used to detect earlier points of release, not by moving the device but rather, by having the golfer move further away from it.

The sensor beam is aligned perpendicular to the line of target and horizontal to the ground at the same height as the height of the back of the golfers hand closest to the target when gripping his club in the normal address position with the sole of his club flat on the ground. It is also the minimum height at which the club should be when it becomes horizontal to the ground with the wrists still fully cocked. When the club reaches this position, the upper end of the grip will be immediately above a line, perpendicular to the target, which intersects the bottom of the golfers swing.

A right-handed golfer is directed to assume his stance so that the intended bottom of his swing is exactly the same distance from a line immediately beneath the sensor beam as is the length of a line from the back of his left hand to the head of the particular club he is using. This can be done easily enough by taking a normal grip on the club with the left hand, then laying the club on the ground in front of him so that the head is touching the line immediately beneath the sensor beam with the club itself parallel to the line of target, then taking a position so that the intended bottom of his swing is on a line, perpendicular to the club, which crosses the back of his left hand. He will then be in a position to determine whether or not he maintains his wrist-cock until the latest point of release when he swings.

Naturally he will trigger the sensor beam when he brings the club back away from the ball in his backswing with wrists extended, but this is unimportant since we are interested only in whether or not he triggers it in his downswing. If he triggers the beam on his downswing, this would indicate that his swing radius exceeded the limit set by his position and the beam. Then, he is directed to move gradually away from the beam towards the target and continue to hit ballsafter each gradual move, until he reaches that point where he can finally hit a ball without triggering the device. At this point, he is directed to measure the distance from his present position back to his original starting position. This measurement would be a relative measure of how early he was releasing his wrists, because when he releases his wrists, centrifugal force carries the clubhead outward from the center of its circular path, and it follows that the earlier he releases his wrists, the further out his clubhead would be cast by the time it gets to the sensor beam. Consequently, the further away from the original position the golfer must stand in order to swing without setting off the beam, is a relative measure of how early he is releasing his wrists in his downswing.

It is also possible to provide a plurality of beams parallel to each other and by identifying the beam or beams interrupted determine the extent to which the swing radius has exceeded the closest beam, thus deterdownswing.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION The invention is embodied in a device which employs the golfer as part of the total geometry of detection of the radius of his swing, the device consisting of a detection beam of any form of radiation, with appropriate connection to an indicator, a signal, or recorder, the radiation preferably beingany light source definable in a narrow beam aimed at a specific point to establish a line, perpendicular to the line of the target at a particular level above ground, coordinated with a mat on the ground, with position lines on the mat parallel to the line of radiation so that the golfer can take his stance on the mat in defined relation to the length of the club being used, the beam, and the idealized radius which would be made by his particular length club. In effect the beam would be just cleared by the end of the club as he swung toward the ball, and any increase in the radius, particularly brought on by premature uncocking of wrists, would be detected by interruption of the radiation beam.

The invention according to the preferred embodiment is in the detection device and its coordinated combination with the mat, so that the combination of elements and arrangement of parts in use by a golfer will make it possible in the appropriate assembly and the geometry to detect the extent of wrist uncocking premature to the preselected point in the downswing as indicated.

A detailed understanding of the invention can be had by reference to the following drawings in which,

FIG. 1 represents a diagram of a golfer in his current swing in relation to the detection device;

FIG. 2 indicates a manner of calibrating the mat; and

FIG. 3 illustrates in block diagram form the elementary circuit requirements of the beam detector; and

FIG. 4 indicates a golfer in a bad swing.

Referring now to the drawings for a better understanding of the device:

In FIG. 1, which is the representation of a righthanded golfer making a swing, represents the golfer, 11 his left arm, 13 his left leg, 14 his right leg, 15 his left foot, and 16 his right foot.

His hands are designated left hand, 17 and right hand, 18. In the position shown the golfer is in midswing with club 20, gripping handle 21, in a position parallel to the ground. In this position the golfers left wrist 17' and right wrist 18' are cocked and I have identified in the diagram a triangle defined by point 25 in the golfers left wrist, 26 a point in the left shoulder, and 27 the head of the club.

In order to detect the proper point and proper curvature for the arc as shown with club on triangle 26, 25, and 27 I have provided the swing detection or wrist cocking detection device, consisting of mat 50 carrying measured calibration marks 51 as indicated to whatever degree of refinement is desired, the mat 50 being rectangular and consisting of the base mat having side areas of grass 55 and 56, and end 57. The purpose of the mat is to provide a calibrated position for the golfer as will be explained in further detail.

At the end of the mat and aligned with the end 57 I provide stanchion 58, and means 59 for having it perpendicular on the ground, the stanchion being equipped internally with electrical means for light and collimator 60. The collimator or beam defining device is aimed to cast a narrow beam across the width of the mat parallel to the ground and perpendicular to the line of target, at a predetermined height to be seen by detector carried by stanchion 81, on base 82. It is to be understood that stanchions 58 and 81 are made height adjustable in any conventional fashion so that the exact height of the beam off the ground can be adjusted to the height of the back of the golfers hand when holding a club in the normal address position with the sole of the club resting flat on the grass mat.

In this position if the golfer had released or uncooked his wrists prematurely, for example as in FIG. 4 at position 40, it will be seen that the radius of the arc of the swing would belarger, and that the club would pass through the line of radiation. Elementary, block design detail of the circuit for the light of radiation detection is shown in FIG. 3. Where the stanchion 58 is indicated a power source is used to generate a light beam with a source 91, followed by collimating elements 92 and 93, to define a narrow beam 70. It should be noted that the beam should be quite specific and narrow, directed over to photocell detector 80, with appropriate amplifying circuit connected thereto for activating a signal for display. The details of this latter arrangement may be varied to suit the designer.

In FIG. 2 I have illustrated the manner in which the golfer positions himself for training and measuring. First, the golfer grips the club with his hand 17 closest to the target in his normal grip holding the club in its normal address position with the sole of the club resting flat on the grass. Then he places the club on the mat, without releasing his grip, so that the club is parallel to the line of target and that the clubhead is touching a line directly below the line of radiation. Next, he assumes his position on the mat so that the intended bottom of his swing is on a line, perpendicular to the target, which intersects the back of his hand. This position is the ideal position in relation to the line of radiation so that when he swings the club, in order for the clubhead to clear the line of radiation, he must have his wrists cocked sufficiently so that the angle between his forearm closest to the target and his golf club is no more than ninety degrees, when the back of hishand closest to the target reaches that point in his downswing where it is above the line intersecting the intended bottom of his swing.

It will be seen that any significant increase in this angle beyond the minimum angle required by this position will cause enlargement of the radius of the arc, inducing an interruption of the beam of radiation, thereby activating the signal. The signal can be made audible, or in any form which suits the fancy of the designer of the installation. I have found an audible chime eminently suitable.

For control purposes for use in public places it is apparent that a coin box attachment to the light beam or the electrical portion of the apparatus can be provided so that a time interval of use of the device can be had for a given small fee.

In FIG. 2 two areas 55, 56 are to take account of the fact that there may be left-handed or right-handed golf ers using the equipment and hence a stance which constitutes the inverse of the position shown in the FIG. 1 becomes possible.

Although the invention has been described in relation to this specific embodiment it is to be understood it may be varied in detail without departing from its spirit or scope.

What is claimed is:

1. Apparatus for detecting the locus of a golf clubhead in a golfer's swing in the act of swinging to hit a ball which comprises source of radiation and detector thereof established in geometric relation to a golfer so that radiation is directed through the plane of the swing essentially in the area of the downswing in combination with a mat and means on said mat for measuring distance from golfers position to said line of radiation so that golfer in his downswing maintains a swing radius limited by the line of radiation and his own position so if said limited swing radius be exceeded clubhead will pass through said line of radiation developing a signal for the golfer so that comparison may be made between distance measured and an ideal distance preselected by golfer.

2. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 including a plurality of beams to detect extent to which radius of golfers swing exceeds the limit set by his own position and the beam closest to his own position.

3. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 which coma mat adapted to be placed on the ground said mat.

being rectangular in form and carrying indicia thereon to define positions,

stanchions at two comers of said mat at the ends of one side thereof said stanchions respectively carrying a source of light and a detector therefor said stanchions being established at corners of said mat to define by means of a beam of light a line parallel to the mat over a defined point at the end thereof,

a line on said mat representing an idealized center for a golfers club in midswing coordinated to permit positioning the golfer ideally with respect to said detection beam, his ball, and his target.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US720406 *Sep 29, 1902Feb 10, 1903Stanley CliffordDevice for teaching the golf-swing.
US2571974 *Nov 18, 1946Oct 16, 1951Walker JohnGolf training device
US2985452 *Oct 14, 1959May 23, 1961Trippet William ABatting practice apparatus
US3009704 *Jan 21, 1960Nov 21, 1961Maurice E HeardGolf training device
US3350102 *Mar 23, 1965Oct 31, 1967Jr Frank M TiernanGolfer's head movement control device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4164352 *Jan 26, 1978Aug 14, 1979Brien John P OGolf swing practice mat
US4212116 *Feb 5, 1979Jul 15, 1980Hajduch James DTraining apparatus for visually impaired person
US4239227 *Jul 12, 1979Dec 16, 1980Davis Leighton IAthletic swing training device and method
US4279420 *Dec 17, 1979Jul 21, 1981Marvon BayPortable golf practice platform
US4477079 *Aug 16, 1982Oct 16, 1984White Arthur AGolf swing training and practice device
US7594860 *Oct 16, 2006Sep 29, 2009Dream N Act Co. LimitedGolf swing training method and apparatus
US7874929 *Jan 25, 2011Accuputt International, Inc.System and method for training a golf club stroke
US8177654 *May 15, 2012Pelz David TGolf training system
US9114302 *Oct 18, 2013Aug 25, 2015Mark Philip MendelsohnGolf swing training device and a method for using the same
US9155953 *Sep 30, 2011Oct 13, 2015Yansheng ZhaoPhotoelectric sensing instant display type golf swing collimation trainer
US20060014589 *Nov 15, 2004Jan 19, 2006Kim Man CApparatus for measuring golf club swing speed
US20080090673 *Oct 16, 2006Apr 17, 2008Andrew Jason GoodGolf swing training method and apparatus
US20080248890 *Aug 17, 2007Oct 9, 2008Blanchard Ralph JSystem and Method for Training a Golf Club Stroke
US20110159980 *Dec 30, 2010Jun 30, 2011Pelz David TGolf training system
US20120309555 *Sep 30, 2011Dec 6, 2012Yansheng ZhaoPhotoelectric Sensing Instant Display Type Golf Swing Collimation Trainer
US20150111656 *Oct 18, 2013Apr 23, 2015Mark Philip MendelsohnGolf swing training device and a method for using the same
WO1983001202A1 *Oct 8, 1982Apr 14, 1983Mayes, Brian, EdwardPractice aid for golfers
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/225
International ClassificationA63B69/36
Cooperative ClassificationA63B2220/805, A63B69/3614
European ClassificationA63B69/36C2