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Publication numberUS3802100 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 9, 1974
Filing dateJan 22, 1973
Priority dateJan 22, 1973
Also published asCA993468A, CA993468A1
Publication numberUS 3802100 A, US 3802100A, US-A-3802100, US3802100 A, US3802100A
InventorsW Prater
Original AssigneeW Prater
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Snowshoe
US 3802100 A
Abstract
A snowshoe having a frame, crossbars and webbing laced thereon is disclosed wherein the webbing supports, at a forward end portion of the frame, a metallic cross hinge rod. A binding, having a relatively rigid or metallic foot plate, is pivotally mounted on the hinge rod. The foot plate supports, at its underside, a downwardly projecting, relatively rigid, or metallic cross cleat at its forward end portion and at a location forward of the hinge rod. Also, downwardly projecting, and generally, lengthwise extending cleats are connected to the bottom surface of the foot plate. The forward end portions of the lengthwise extending cleats diverge from each other. Another cleat is carried crosswise of the snowshoe and by a crossbar and ahead of the first mentioned cleat. The cleats preferably are serrated on their bottom edges. The undersurfaces of the foot plate and of the forward cross bar are lined with a flexible, waterproof sheet of material, which repels ice and snow buildup. Portions of the sheet material lining the foot plate are puffed or spaced from the undersurface of the plate to lessen the adherence of snow to the lining.
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United States Patent m1 Prater [11] 3,802,100 [45] Apr. 9,1974

[21] Appl. No.: 325,507

[52] US. Cl. 36/25 AB [51] Int. Cl A43b 00/00 [58] Field of Search 36/25 R, 2.5 AA, 2.5 AB

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,511,087 6/1950 Villemur.... 36/25 AB 2,738,596 3/1956 Walsh... 36/25 AB 1,004,900 10/1911 Pease 36/25 AB 3,638,333 2/1972 Sprandel 36/25 AB Primary Examiner-Patrick D. Lawson [57] ABSTRACT A snowshoe having a frame, crossbars and webbing laced thereon is disclosed wherein the webbing sup ports, at a forward end portion of the frame, a metallic cross hinge rod. A binding, having a relatively rigid or metallic foot plate, is pivotally mounted on the hinge rod. The foot plate supports, at its underside, a downwardly projecting, relatively rigid, or metallic cross cleat at its forward end portion and at a location forward of the hinge rod. Also, downwardly projecting, and generally, lengthwise extending cleats are connected to'the bottom surface of the foot plate. The forward end portions of the lengthwise extending cleats diverge from each other. Another cleat is carried crosswise of the snowshoe and by a crossbar and ahead of the first mentioned cleat. The cleats preferably are serrated on their bottom edges. The undersurfaces of the foot plate and of the forward cross bar are lined with a flexible, waterproof sheet of material, which repels ice and snow buildup. Portions of the sheet material lining the foot plate are puffed or spaced from the undersurface of the plate to lessen the adherence of snow to the lining.

5 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures 1. Field of Invention Snowshoes have been convenient, and often necessary, equipment for those who must travel by foot over relatively deep and soft snow. The number of parties who must now use snowshoes has increased many fold due to the great number of sport oriented people who are now present on areas where snow fields are or may be expected, all inaddition to people who are present on the snow fields for reasons of necessity or business;

2. Description of Prior Art US. Pat. No. 3,638,333 isillustrative of theprior art except such patentshows a plastic one-piece snowshoe which, in my opinion, is not an entirely satisfactory device. In general, the prior art failed to teach, in connection with a snowshoe frame, crossbars, and webbing laced thereon, of ametallic cross hinge rod secured to the webbing. Also, it failed to teach the use of a binding embodying relatively rigid or metallic foot plate, supporting on its undersurface, a bearing journaling the cross hinge rod. Also, it failed to disclose suitable traction devices for engaging the snow surface without substantial slippage and means to prevent caking of the snow on bottomportions of the binding.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The invention relates to asnowshoe having a frame, crossbars, and webbing, wherein a relatively rigid, cross, hinge rod is supportedata forwardcnd portion of the frame by the said webbing: Next, a binding with a relatively rigid footplate is provided with abearing on its undersurface and which bearing journals the cross hinge rod. The boot, on the foot of the user of the snowshoe, is held by an appropriate binding with the ball of the foot of the user alined oversaid bearing.

The underside of the foot plate of the binding carries downwardly projecting cleats, one of which extends crosswise, and two others, which extend generally lengthwise, and with their forward ends diverging. Also, the cross cleat is carriedby one of the crossbars of the snowshoe. Preferably, the bottom edge portions of all cleats are serrated and the bottom of the foot plate islined with a sheet of flexible material, having portions thereof puffed or spaced from the foot plate, to lessen the tendency of the snow to adhere with the bottom of the foot plate.

These and other objects of my invention will become implicit and explicit asthe description thereof proceeds in connection with the accompanying specification and drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Referringito the drawings, wherein like reference numerals refer to like parts:

FIG. 1 isan elevational view, with the shoe of the wearer and the snowline in phantom, illustratin'gan embodiment of my invention;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the device shown in FIG.

FIG; 3 is an enlarged, fragmentary, bottom view; and

FIG. 4 is a sectional viewtaken substantially on broken line 44 of FIG. 3. j

DESCRIPTION OF A PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to thefigures, a frame 10 forms the periphery of the snowshoe and aconventional form thereof is illustrated. While wood, such as white ash, is preferably employed in fabricating the frame 10, other materials may be employedas is conventional. The frame 10 is reinforced by forwardcrossbar l2 and rear crossbar l4 and in a conventional manner. The webbing, 16 is laced tightly to the frame 10. Such webbing 16 is preferably formed of synthetics, as nylon fabric witha heavy Neoprene coating. Cross webbing 18 comprises a plurality of loops andthe end portions there-of are securedto opposite side rails forming the frame: 10. A hinge rod 20 (FIG. 4) terminates in end eyelets 22 (FIG. 3). Longitudinally extending webbings 24comprise a plurality of webbings and are connected with cross webbing 18, eyelets 22, and forward crossbar 12; webbings 24 secure end eyelets 22 between forward crossbar l2 and cross webbing l8 and with a space 26 between the eyelets 22 and the forward crossbar 12. Two short cross webbings 28, each comprising a plurality of webbings, are provided, and each thereof connects between a side rail of the frame 10 and an eyelet 22. All of the various webbings 16, 24, and28 are maintained in a taut or very tight condition as walking on snowshoes with loose webbing is highly unsatisfactory. One author has well characterized the unsatisfactory character of loose webbings by stating:

Walking on snowshoes with slack webbing is rather like walking on a soggy pancake fried in cold grease,an awful sensation! In addition, it is desired that the hinge rod 20 be maintained relatively rigid by its supporting structure for the greatest advantages of the present invention.

A binding having a relatively rigid foot plate 30 (may be formed of aluminum alloysheetmetal) has aforwardend portion which projects downwardly andthe lower end portion thereof forms a relatively rigid, downwardly projecting, cross cleat .32. The trailing end portion of the foot plate 30 is provided with downwardly projecting side portions forming downwardly projecting cleats 34 which extend generally lengthwise of the foot plate 30 and preferably at an angle thereto so that the trailing end portions thereof converge toward each other or, conversely, the forward end portions diverge from each other.

Below the foot plate 30, a bearing retainer clip 36 is detachably secured thereto and by laterally spaced nuts and bolts 38. A split bearing 40, formed of suitable plastic material, encircles hinge rod 20 and journals said rod 20 for angular movement thereof. Then the bearing 40 and the rod 20 are held in place by bearing retainer clip 36and such clip is held in place by nuts and bolts 38. Before securing hinge: rod 20 in place by webbing 18, 24, 28, the hinge rod was originally equipped with two side thrust washers 42 thereon (see FIGS. 3 and 4) and such washers serve as side thrust bearing means after the foot plate 30 is mounted on such rod 20 and provide thrust bearings for the ends of bearing 40 or the ends of bearing retainer clip 36 and the end eyelets 22.

I A rigid, metallic, cross cleat 44(may be formed of an aluminum alloy metal sheet) is secured to and has a portion thereof projecting downwardly from the forward crossbar 12. All the other metal parts may likewise be formed of suitable metal such as aluminum alloy sheet metal. All the cleats 44, 32, and 34 preferably have their lower vertical edges serrated to facilitate insertion into snow, and particularly ice-crusted snow. Sheets of flexible material, 46 and 47, are coated nylon or other tough waterproof, flexible sheeting and are thus water repellant. Such sheets are fitted to the undersides of the metallic elements, cleat 44 and foot plate 30, and such sheets are held in place, respectively, by rivets 48 to plate 30 and by nut and bolt means 50 to the forward crossbar 12. The sheet 46 preferably has portions thereof puffed or spaced from the underside of the binding foot plate 30. Thus, portions of the sheet 46, preferably, may move independently of the foot plate 30 and in so doing can release snow tending to adhere to the said material 46. The nut and bolt means 50 secure the cross cleat 44 to the forward crossbar 12.

A boot 52 (FIG. 1) of the user of the snowshoe is releasably secured to the snowshoe by a binding body member 54 formed of tough, flexible, waterproof material and straps 56 laced in hooks 58 and around the heel of the boot 52. The boot 52, binding body member 54, binding 56, and hooks 58 are typical of a desirable binding as to construction and material.

In constructing the snowshoe, the frame is preferably of desirable wood, such as white ash. Then the various webbings 18, 24, and 28 are secured in place with the proper tension and at the same time the hinge rod is secured in place and with the eyelets 22 thereof secured to the longitudinal webbing 24 and to the short cross webbings 28. These webbings 24 and 28 should be tight so that the hinge rod will be maintained firm. All the weight of the user on a foot plate 30 is transmitted therefrom to the snowshoe through the hinge rod 20 and thus the said webbings must be tight for proper functioning of the snowshoe. Surrounding the rod 20 is a bearing 40 which is split for ready insertion. Then this bearing 40 is secured to the binding foot plate 30 by bearing retainer clip 36. This type of bearing provides for minimum friction connection between the plate 30 and the hinge rod 20 even though the parts may be cold during operation and are oftentimes ice coated. Also, as the wearer walks, the boot 52 and the hinge rod 20, carrying the snowshoe, may articulate and the snowshoe lifted and drawn forward and with the shoe itself taking the more complex movements inherent in walking. Also, the toe of the boot 52 can move into and out of the space 26 forward of the hinge rod 20 and thus permit free angular movement of the foot plate 30 about the hinge rod 20 and without interference with the normal movements of the boot 52 while walking with the snowshoes.

The cross cleat 32, side cleats 34 and rigid cross cleat 44, all have their lower edge portions serrated to enhance the snow penetration and particularly where an ice crust is present. By having the flexible sheeting 46 on the under horizontal surfaces of the metallic foot plate 30 and also having such sheeting 46 loosely fitted or puffed or spaced, then as the weight of the snowshoe user is brought to bear upon and released from such sheeting 46, the sheeting is caused to move relatively to the plate 30 and with the result of snow loosening and tending to maintain the sheeting 46 snow free.

SUMMARY From the foregoing, it will now be apparent that the snowshoe of my invention comprises a frame 10, crossbars 12 and 14, and webbings l6, 18, 24, and 28 thereon and where webbings 24 and 28 firmly hold hinge rod 20 in place through the end eyelets 22. This hinge rod 20 is connected to the binding foot plate 30 through a bearing comprising a split plastic bearing 40. The binding foot plate 30 has a cross cleat 32 positioned at its forward end portion and forward of the hinge rod 20 and thus during walking the toe of a boot 52 will move downwardly into the space 26 and the cross cleat 32 and side cleats 34, mounted on the movable binding foot plate 30, will enter into the snow below the snowshoe as the user rocks forward on his feet in walking and move out of the snow as the user rocks on his feet in the other direction. More in detail, the rearmost foot of a user, in walking, will first have both cleat means 32 and 34 piercing the snow surface. During the travel of such foot to a foremost position, first the side cleat means 34 will be withdrawn from the snow and the cross cleat means 32 will be more deeply embedded. Next the user can push forward and against said cleat means 32. Then the said foot is moved to the foremost position and while the body weight of the user rests on the other foot and while both cleat means 32 and 34 under said other foot pierce the snow surface. Then the said other foot becomes the rearmost foot and may then function as described. Thus, the cleat means 32 and 34 carried by the underside of the foot plate 30 have distinct function by reason of such position.

The side cleats 34 extend generally lengthwise of the snowshoe and the trailing end portions thereof converge toward each other. Whenever a snowshoe is moved downwardly into engagement with the snow, then the rigid cross cleat 44 will enter into the snow therebelow. The bottom edge portions of cleats 32, 34 and 44 are all preferably serrated on the bottom edge portions thereof to facilitate penetration into icecrusted snow. Also, preferably, the rigid cross cleat 44 is carried by forward crossbar 12 and is lined with snow-repellant material. The under horizontal surface of foot plate 30 is lined with a sheet of tough, flexible, waterproof material 46, and such material is puffed or spaced from the foot plate 30 to permit movement between the metallic foot plate member and the flexible material 46 and thus loosen adherence of snow to the material 46.

Obviously, changes may be made in the forms, dimensions and arrangements of the parts of my invention without departing from the principle thereof, the foregoing setting forth only preferred forms of embodiment of my invention.

1 claim:

1. In a snowshoe having a frame, crossbars and webbing thereon, the combination comprising a relatively rigid, cross hinge rod supported by the webbing at a forward end portion of the frame; a relatively rigid foot plate having a sleeve on its underside, pivotally connected to said hinge rod by said sleeve; and relatively rigid, downwardly projecting, cleat means positioned at the underside of said foot plate, extending generally crosswise of, and longitudinally offset sufficiently from said hinge rod, so that said cleat means will enter and exit from snow during use of the snowshoe while walking and pivoting said foot plate about said hinge rod.

2. The combination of claim 1, wherein relatively rigid, downwardly projecting, and generally longitudinally extending cleat means are connected with the 4. The combination of claim 1, wherein an additional cross cleat means is carried by a frame crossbar forward of said foot plate and wherein said foot plate and said cleat means are all metallic.

5. The combination of claim 4 wherein said additional cleat means is lined with a snow-repellant material.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1004900 *Jan 14, 1911Oct 3, 1911Albert Judson PeaseSnow-shoe.
US2511087 *Jan 4, 1949Jun 13, 1950Albert A WillemurSnowshoe binding
US2738596 *Nov 15, 1954Mar 20, 1956William R WalshSnowshoe guide and climber
US3638333 *Jul 20, 1970Feb 1, 1972Hans W SprandelSnowshoe and harness
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4334369 *Sep 3, 1980Jun 15, 1982Brunel Paul HubertSki-shoe
US5014450 *Aug 21, 1989May 14, 1991Mcgrath James JSnowshoe
US5341582 *Apr 6, 1993Aug 30, 1994Sherpa, Inc.Anti-slip device for footwear
US5517772 *May 6, 1994May 21, 1996Sherpa, Inc.Snowshoe having means limiting articulation of binding support plate
US5531035 *Mar 10, 1994Jul 2, 1996Mountain Safety ResearchSnowshoe binding assembly
US5540002 *Jan 26, 1995Jul 30, 1996Sherpa, Inc.Snowshoe having a claw plate on the underside of a snowshoe frame
US5659981 *Sep 25, 1995Aug 26, 1997Liautaud; Jeffrey T.Snowshoe
US5687491 *Jan 26, 1996Nov 18, 1997Atlas Snow-Shoe CompanySnowshoe with contoured footbed
US5699630 *Aug 14, 1995Dec 23, 1997Atlas Snow-Shoe CompanySnowshoe with front and rear cleats
US5809667 *Jan 24, 1995Sep 22, 1998Liautaud; Jeffrey T.Snowshoe having snap-on claw plate
US5921007 *Oct 21, 1996Jul 13, 1999Mountain Safety Research, Inc.Mountaineering snowshoe
US6178666 *Oct 12, 1999Jan 30, 2001Tubbs Snowshoe Company, LlcMolded snowshoe
US6195919Apr 20, 1999Mar 6, 2001Mountain Safety Research, Inc.Mountaineering snowshoe
US6247253Sep 14, 1999Jun 19, 2001Macintyre S. ScottRemovable cleat for snowshoe
US6505423Dec 22, 1997Jan 14, 2003Tubbs Snowshoe CompanySnowshoe with front and rear cleats
US6898874 *Jan 4, 2002May 31, 2005K2 Snowshoes, Inc.Snowshoe with two degrees of rotational freedom
US8020321 *Dec 13, 2006Sep 20, 2011K-2 CorporationSnowshoe footbed pivot system
US8302331Jan 21, 2010Nov 6, 2012Faber & Co., Inc.Harness hinge member attachment for snowshoe
US20030126764 *Jan 4, 2002Jul 10, 2003Emerson Daniel T.Snowshoe with two degrees of rotational freedom
US20080141564 *Dec 13, 2006Jun 19, 2008Gregory Vinton MatthewsSnowshoe footbed pivot system
US20110173845 *Jul 21, 2011Guy FaberHarness hinge member attachment for snowshoe
EP2498881A1 *Nov 12, 2010Sep 19, 2012K-2 CorporationSnowshoe with pivoted boot binding
EP2498881A4 *Nov 12, 2010Apr 16, 2014K 2 CorpSnowshoe with pivoted boot binding
WO1986004489A1 *Jun 14, 1985Aug 14, 1986Jack Saffron Sports Inc.Improvements in replaceable shoe soles
WO2015026698A1 *Aug 18, 2014Feb 26, 2015Eric DarnellSnow mobility device
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/124
International ClassificationA63C13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63C13/001, A63C13/003, A63C13/005, A63C13/006
European ClassificationA63C13/00S, A63C13/00C, A63C13/00F