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Publication numberUS3802206 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 9, 1974
Filing dateMar 8, 1972
Priority dateMar 8, 1972
Publication numberUS 3802206 A, US 3802206A, US-A-3802206, US3802206 A, US3802206A
InventorsMoore A, Moore R
Original AssigneeMoore A, Moore R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pile splicer
US 3802206 A
Abstract
Splicing means for connecting two wood piles, end-to-end, to make a long pile for transfer of pile-loads to lower, stronger ground. The splicer comprises: at least one plate-like, substantially horizontal element adapted to lie between adjacent pile ends, with optional epoxy glue between upper and lower surfaces of this element and the upper and lower piles; and a central upright dowel member, extending above and below the plate-like element. This plate-like element is in the form of a disk in FIGS. 1 to 3 and 6 to 9; in FIGS. 4 and 5 there are two plate-like elements (the horizontal parts of angle irons, these irons being welded on opposite sides of the dowel); and in FIGS. 10 and 11, the plate-like element has two parts that are at angles to each other and integrally joined at their lower lines of junction (this angle plate being fixed to a V-shaped cut in the lower pile). Preferably, the splicer comprises other pile penetrating and anchoring elements that are fixed to the plate-like element, for example: the piece of six-inch pipe of FIGS. 1 to 7, extending around the disk (or angle irons of FIG. 4), driven into the upper and lower piles; the vertically-extending parts of the angle irons of FIGS. 4 and 5; the prongs of FIGS. 6 and 7, struck-out from the disk; the laterally placed, double-point pins of FIGS. 8 and 9; or the hammer-driven nails or spikes of FIGS. 10 and 11. And preferably the upper pile section of the composite pile is within a tightly clamped metal band, and is at least 30 feet long.
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United States Patent [191 Moore et al.

1 Apr. 9, 1974 1 1 PILE SPLICER [76] Inventors: Robert Fred Moore, 1625 3rd Ave.,

Picayune, Miss. 39446; Alvin Edward Moore, 916 Beach Blvd., Waveland, Miss. 39576 [22] Filed: Mar. 8, 1972 21 Appl. No.: 232,659

[52] US. Cl. 61/53, 287/127, 287/2092 E, 287/2092 L [51] Int. Cl. E0211 5/26, F16b 7/00 [58] Field of Search 61/53, 54, 53.5; 287/2092 L, 20.92 E, 127 R [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,438,659 4/1969 Waldron 287/2092 E 2.821.069 1/1958 Fox 61/53 684,044 10/1901 Commons..... 61/53 X 3.201.834 8/1965 Baittinger 61/53 X 1.073.614 9/1913 McDearmid.. 61/53 2.117.567 5/1938 Myer et a1 287/2092 L 826.125 7/1906 Steinmetz 287/2092 L 3.307.362 3/1967 Cravens et 211.... 61/53 X 569.235 10/1896 Rockwell 287/2092 E FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 85.932 3/1936 Sweden 61/53 Primary Examiner-Jacob Shapiro Attorney. Agent, or F irmAlvin Edward Moore 5 7 ABSTRACT Splicing means for connecting two wood piles, end-toend, to make a long pile for transfer of pile-loads to lower, stronger ground. The splicer comprises: at least one plate-like. substantially horizontal element adapted to lie between adjacent pile ends. with optional epoxy glue between upper and lower surfaces of this element and the upper and lower piles; and a central upright dowel member. extending above and below the plate-like element. This plate-like element is in the form of a disk in FIGS. 1 to 3 and 6 to 9; in FIGS. 4 and 5 there are two plate-like elements (the horizontal parts of angle irons, these irons being welded on opposite sides of the dowel); and in FIGS. 10 and 11, the plate-like element has two parts that are at angles to each other and integrally joined at their lower lines of junction (this angle plate being fixed to a V-shaped cut in the lower pile). Preferably, the splicer comprises other pile penetrating and anchoring elements that are fixed to the plate-like element, for example: the piece of six-inch pipe of FIGS. 1 to'7, extending around the disk (or angle irons of FIG. 4), driven into the upper and lower piles; the vertically-extending parts of the angle irons of FIGS. 4 and 5; the prongs of FIGS. 6 and 7, struck-out from the disk; the laterally placed, double-point pins of FIGS. 8 and 9; or the hammer-driven nails or spikes of FIGS. 10 and 11. And preferably the upper pile section of the composite pile is within a tightly clamped metal band, and is at least 30 feet long.

12 Claims, 11 Drawing Figures PATENTEB AFR 91974 Riga/47 m WW k was FILE SPLICER Because timber piles are often required in lengths too long to be made from single tree trunks there is need for an efficient splicer to join ends of two piles, thus forming a long pile, able to transfer loads to deep, stronger ground. another advantage of such a composite pile is that the lower pile may be of untreated wood, while the upper pile (mostly above the water table and thus vulnerable to rot) may be treated with wood preservative. In view of these facts, some objects of this invention are to provide: (1) a pile splicer having elements that will efficiently penetrate upper and lower piles, anchoring them together; (2) a splicer comprising a metal plate, fitting between and against ends of two piles, and pile-penetrating elements above and below the plate; (3) a splicer having an upright tube, adapted to be driven into end portions of end-joined piles and pile-anchoring elements, fixed to the tube, one of these elements being an upright polepenetrating dowel, longer than the tube; (4) a splicer having an angled plate and nails or spikes driven into adjacent V-jointed piles; (5) a composite pile comprising a pair of upright, end-to-end piles, the upper one of which has a factory-drilled hole, and a splicer having elongated, upright, integral dowel portions, one pressed into the pre-drilled hole and the other forced down into an on-the-site-drilled hole; and (6) a fastening device for forming a joint between ends of piles or the like having a central dowel means and angle irons fixed to the dowel means.

Other objects of the invention will be apparent from consideration of the following specification and the accompanying drawings.

In these drawings:

FIG. 1 is an elevational, exploded view, partly broken away, of upper and lower piles and a splicer by which they may be joined;

FIG. 2 is a mostly plan view from the sectional plane 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an elevational view, partly broken away, showing the composite pile, comprising two pile sections that are connected by the invented splicer;

FIG. 4 is an elevational, exploded view, partly broken away, of two piles and a second form of the invented splicer;

FIG. 5 is a mostly plan view from the sectional plane 2-2 of FIG. 4;

FIGS. 6 and 7 are views similar to FIGS. 4 and 5, illustrating a third form of the splicer;

FIG. 8 is a vertical, sectional view of two piles joined by a fourth form of the splicer, with the resulting composite pile shown as being driven into the ground;

FIG. 9 is a top plan of the splicer of FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a vertical, sectional view of two piles joined by a fifth optional form of the invented splicer; and

FIG. 11 is a plan view of the angled plate and central dowel element of FIG. 10.

In each of the forms of the invention the splicer comprises: at least one metallic, plate-like element (optionally the disk 1 of FIGS. 1 to 3, or each of the substantially horizontal parts 2 of the angle irons 4 of FIGS. 4 and 5, the disk of FIGS. 6 and 7, the disk 6 of FIGS. 8 and 9, or the angled plate 7 of FIGS. 10 and 11); central dowel means, fixed to the plate-like means, comprising a pin 8 extending upward from the plate-like element and a pin 9, extending down from the said element (these pins preferably being integral, forming a single elongated dowel member); and other pileanchoring means (the tubular element 10 of FIGS. 1 to 7; or the sharp-pointed pins or dowels 12 of FIGS. 8 and 9; or the nails or spikes 14 and 16 of FIG. 10); and- /or optional epoxy glue (liquid cement or putty) that may be placed on each side of the plate-like means). The plate-like elements of FIGS. 1 to 3 and 6 to 9 have holes 18 which further aid in anchoring the pile ends together when epoxy glue is used, for the glue goes thru the holes and cements the ends of both piles to each other, as well as to the plate. At least the lower tip of the pile 38 is clamped within a tightly crimped steel band, 17. Optionally, the butt of the lower pile 34 (at the joint) may be thus clamped.

The elements 8-9, 10 and 12 are welded to the platelike means. The tube 10 of FIGS. 1, 2, 6 and 7 (preferably a piece of six-inch standard pipe, approximately eight inches long) is welded to the disk (1, 5), preferably all around the edges of the disk. In FIG. 4 the arcuate ends of the oppositely extending angle irons 4 are welded to the inner curvature of the tube. Preferably, the horizontal parts 2 of these angles are 1 /2 inches wide; and their vertical parts 20 and 22 are 2% inches deep. These vertical parts, in addition to the tube 10, serve as pile-anchoring means, for during the first blow of the pile hammer on the upper pile the part 20 penetrates the lower pile and the part 22 penetrates the upper one.

In FIG. 6 the plate-like means (the disk 5) has prongs 24 and 25 that are cut out from it and bent into vertical positions, forming the holes 18 in the process. The prongs 24 penetrate the upper pile, and the prongs 25 penetrate the lower pile.

In FIG. 8, the pile-penetrating pins 12 are extended thru holes in the plate 6 and welded there at each pins middle portion. As in the splicers of FIGS. 1, 6 and 10 the central dowel means 8-9 preferably is a single metal dowel, extended thru and welded in a hole in the platelike element. The dowel means 8-9 of FIG. 4 is also similarly welded at its middle portion to the vertical elements '20 and 22.

In FIGS. 10 and 11, the angled plate 7 approximately fits in the V-shaped cut in the lower pile. This steel plate is sufficiently bendable at its middle line 26 for its parts 27 and 28 to move under pile-hammer blows into tight contact with the bottom V-shaped cut and the angled lower end of the upper pile. The pile 38 preferably has a minimum length of 30 feet. Therefore, the joint is within deep, strong ground.

METHOD OF MANUFACTURE This invention comprises a method of making the composite, two-part, elongated pile, having the following steps:

l. The lower pile 34 is driven by the hammer of a pile driver until the top end of this pile is of satisfactory distance above the ground for working on it for example about waist high.

2. Drilling the holes 30 and 32 in the two piles. Preferably these bores 30 and 32 are of slightly less diameter than the major diameter of the dowel means; and in assembly the dowel thus penetrates and compacts the wood around the hole, insuring a tight fit and pole-anchoring friction. For further aid in the pile-guiding and pile-anchoring functions of the dowel means it preferably has a minimum diameter of three-fourths of an inch. When it has this diameter, for example, the holes 30 and 32 preferably have a diameter of eleven-sixteenths of an inch.

3. The dowel element 9 isinserted into thehole 32, and this element is driven into the hole, until the bottom edge of the tube contacts the top of the pile 34 (or, re FIGS. 8 to 11, until the plate-like element, 6 or 7, contacts this top). In driving the pin 9 of FIG. 8 a heavy sledge hammer is preferably used, striking the somewhat blunt upper end of the pin 8. In each form of the invention the dowel means optionally may have ends that are entirely unpointed, as exampled in FIGS. 1 to 3, or have end portions that are sufficiently pointed to provide easy access of these ends into the bores, these end portions being slightly pointed but having blunt, planar tip surfaces 36. For economy of manufacture, the currently preferred dowel means is an unpointed round steel rod of the type illustrated in FIG. 1.

4. The upper pile section 38 is lowered by the pile A driver, and this section is adjusted until the bottom edge of the hole 30 is over and contacting the dowel element 8. I

5. The pile hammer is actuated to drive the pile 38 down over the pin 8, driving other pile-anchoring meansthe tube 10 and/or the plate-like element and its connected auxiliary pile-penetrating elements (20 and 22, or 24 and 25, or 12) into their pile-anchoring positions.

6. The pile driver continues driving the composite pile until its top is in the desired position relative to the ground surface.

The above step (2) preferably comprises two parts: (2A) the holes 30 are pre-drilled in the plant that makes the pile sections; and (2B) the holes 32 are drilled after the pile sections 34 are driven into their junction-forming positions. Also preferably: the following step is taken before (28): the top of the piledriverblunted section 34 is saw-cut into the planar shape of FIGS. 1 to 8 (or the V-shape of FIG. 10); and when the splicer is of the type of FIG. 10, the following step is taken between the above steps (3) and (4): the nails 14 are driven; and also in the case of FIG. 10, the following additional step is taken between the above steps (5) and (6): the nails 16 (which may be spikes) are driven into the two piles, above the upper edges of the steelplate parts 27 and 28. Preferably the nails 14 are 60- penny common nails and the nails 16 are barn nails, longer than the GO-penny kind.

Another optional and preferable step in the method of manufacture comprises the placing of liquid or viscous epoxy cement between the substantially horizontal faces of the plate-like element and the adjacent surfaces of the piles 34 and 38. In the case of FIG. 10, this cementing step results in the glue layers 40 and 42 above the upper edges of the elements 27 and .28, as well as the cement layers between these elements and the pile sections 34 and 38.

In the following claims, unless otherwise qualified: the term dowel means signifies a single, integral dowel or a pair of rigidly pins; and the word nails" means common nails or spikes.

We claim:

1. A device of the character described, adapted to unite ends of upper and lower end-joined piles, comprising:

pile penetrating and anchoring dowel means, comprising metal, adapted to penetrate and anchor middle parts of said end-joined piles;

a pair of angle irons, rigidly and oppositely fixed to middle portions of said dowel means, having in-use approximately horizontal flat parts, adapted to fit bexween closely adjacent ends of said upper and lower piles, and pile-penetrating upright parts that are at right angles to said approximately horizontal parts; the bottom of one of said upright parts being fixed to one of said flat parts, and the top of the other one of said upright parts being fixed to the other said flat part; the said upright parts being adapted for driven penetration and joining of said pile ends; and

welding between said angle irons and dowel means.

2. A device as set forth in claim 1, further comprising: a tube open at each end, having a maximum area in cross section along a plane normal to its axis that is less than the maximum area in cross section thru each of said pile-ends along a plane normal to the pilesaxis,

the said tube being adapted to penetratingly join the. pile ends during driving of the upper pile; and welding cent lower end of the upper pile, the said device further I including a pile-reinforcing metal band, encompassing and tightly clamping the bottom part of the upper pile, restraining said bottom part against splitting during pile-driving of the upper pile, and joining structure to unite ends of the piles during said piledriving; the said joining structure comprising:

plate-like means, having faces adapted to fit between closely adjacent ends of said upper and lower piles;

pile penetrating and anchoring dowel means, comprising metal, located at and rigidly fixed to a middle portion of said plate-like means, having a portion jutting from each of said faces, adapted to penetrate and anchor middle parts of the end-joined piles; plurality of pile penetrating and anchoring elements, connected to said plate-like means, laterally spaced from the perimeters of said pile ends and located between said dowel means and said perimeters, jutting upward and downward from said faces, extending from each face a maximum distance shorter than the maximum extent from that face of the said dowel means, and adapted for driven penetration and joining of said pile ends; and metallic bonding means rigidly and strengthprovidingly joining said plate-like means to said dowel means and to said anchoring elements. 4. A device as set forth in claim 3, further including: a tube, having a maximum cross-sectional area less than the maximum cross-sectional area of each of said pile ends, adapted to penetratingly join the pile ends during driving of the said upper pile, the said tube being fixed to and surrounding said plate-like means and having open upper and lower portions adapted to penetratingly join the pile ends during driving of the upper pile; and metallic bonding means rigidly joining the said tube and plate-like means; the said plate-like means being located at a middle portion of said tube and adapted to serve as a brake during said driving, limiting downward penetration of the tube into said lower pile.

5. A device as set forth in claim 3, comprising a pair of angle irons, rigidly and oppositely fixed to middle portions of said dowel means, and welding between said angle irons and middle portions; and in the said device: said plate-like means comprises approximately horizontal flat parts of said angle irons; and said pile penetrating and anchoring elements comprise upright parts of said angle irons; the bottom of one of said upright parts being at right angles to and fixed to one of said approximately horizontal parts, and the top of the other one of said upright parts being at right angles to and fixed to the other approximately horizontal part.

6. A device as set forth in claim 3, in which: said plate-like means comprises an angled, V-shaped plate; and said pile ends have adjacent, upper and lower, V- shaped portions, substantially conforming to each other and to said V-shaped plate.

7. A device of the character described, inlcuding upper and lower end-joined wooden piles comprising parts of former trees, the upper, butt end of the lower pile having a greater cross-sectional area than the adjacent lower end of the upper pile, the end of one of said piles having a V-shaped cut and the end of the other pile having a shape adapted to fit in said out; the said device further including a pile-reinforcing metal band, encompassing and tightly clamping the bottom part of the upper pile, restraining said bottom part against splitting during pile-driving of the upper pile, and joining structure to unite ends of the piles during said piledriving; the said joining structure comprising:

an angled plate-like member, V-shaped in a cross section, having angled faces adapted to fit between said pile ends;

pile penetrating and anchoring dowel means, comprising metal, located at and rigidly fixed to a middle portion of said plate-like means, having a portion jutting from each of said faces, adapted to penetrate and anchor middle parts of the'end-joined piles; and metallic bonding means between said plate-like member and dowel means; and

other pile penetrating and anchoring means, connected to said plate-like means, jutting upward and downward into the wood of said piles from said faces, extending from each face a maximum distance shorter than the maximum extent from that face of the said dowel means.

8. A device as set forth in claim 7, in which said other pile penetrating and anchoring means comprises nails driven thru holes in said plate-like member, into each of said pile ends.

9. A device of the character described, including upper and lower end-joined, wooden, tree-origin piles, the upper butt end of the lower pile having a greater cross-sectional area than the adjacent lower end of the upper pile, and joining structure adapted to unite ends of the piles during pile-driving of said upper pile, each of the said piles having a central hole extending a short distance from its end; the said joining structure comprising:

plate-like means, having faces adapted to fit between closely adjacent ends of said upper and lower piles;

metallic, pile penetrating and anchoring dowel means, located at and rigidly fixed to a middle part of said plate-like means, having smooth-surfaced pin portions, each comprising solid metal, jutting upward and downward from said faces; each of said pin portions consisting of integral metal, and adapted to be driven into the adjacent one of said holes, and having a cross-sectional area that is sufficiently greater than that of said adjacent one of the holes for compacting of the wood in tight frictional engagement with the dowel means;

plurality of pile penetrating and anchoring elements, rigidly fixed to said plate-like means, jutting from each of said faces, extending from each face a maximum distance shorter than the maximum extent from that face of the said dowel means, and

adapted for driven penetration and joining of said pile ends;

a metallic tube, having a maximum cross-sectional area less than the maximum cross-sectional area of each of said pile ends, adapted to penetrate the wood of the pile ends during driving of the said upper pile, the said tube being rigidly fixed to and surrounding said plate-like means and having open upper and lower portions adapted to penetratingly join the pile ends during driving of the upper pile; the said plate-like means being located at a middle portion of said tube and adapted to serve as a brake during said driving, limiting downward penetration of the tube into said lower pile; and

metallic bonding means rigidly joining interior, middle portions of said tube to said plate-like means.

10. A device as set forth in claim 9, in which: each of said holes has a maximum diameter of elevensixteenths of an inch; and each of said pin portions has a minimum cross-sectional area of three-fourths of an inch.

1]. A device as set forth in claim 10, in which: the hole in said upper-pile end is factory-drilled; the hole in said lower-pile end is drilled in situ; and the integral end of said downward-jutting portion of the dowel means is adapted to be driven into the lower one of said holes by a sledge hammer.

12. A device as set forth in claim 10, comprising a narrow, integral, pile-strengthening, metallic band, clamped around the lower end of said upper pile, lo-

cated adjacent to and above the said plate-like means.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
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US4097165 *Apr 29, 1977Jun 27, 1978Quayle Jackson CPole top extension bracket
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Classifications
U.S. Classification405/251, 403/292, 403/267
International ClassificationE02D5/52, E02D5/22
Cooperative ClassificationE02D5/523
European ClassificationE02D5/52B