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Publication numberUS3802493 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 9, 1974
Filing dateDec 13, 1971
Priority dateDec 13, 1971
Publication numberUS 3802493 A, US 3802493A, US-A-3802493, US3802493 A, US3802493A
InventorsGoettl A
Original AssigneeGoettl A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Air conditioning apparatus
US 3802493 A
Abstract
An air conditioning apparatus is formed with a sump barrier to provide a low-profile evaporative cooler which may be fabricated with auxiliary air inlet openings and controllable damper assemblies so that inlet air may be optionally directed to a blower assembly either through the cooler pads or through the auxiliary inlet openings. The auxiliary inlet openings and damper assemblies allow the apparatus to be equipped with, or coupled to, various devices so that it may function in a variety of air conditioning capacities in combination with its evaporative cooling function.
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' United States Patent [191 Goettl Apr. 9, 1974 AIR CONDITIONING APPARATUS [76] Inventor: Adam D. Goettl, 4960 E. Palomino Dr., Phoenix, Ariz. 85018 [22] Filed: Dec. 13, 1971 [21] Appl. No.1 207,307

521 u.s.c1 165/60, 165/63, 62/314, 261/24, 261 /64 R, 261/72 R, 261/96,

51 Int. Cl ..B0lf3/04 581 Field of Search 261/24, 28, 29, 64 R, 72, 261/96, 105, 10 ,142,110. 34, 137, 151;

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENT 2,725,729 12/1955 Mills .L 261/29 2,620,722 12/1952 Owens 261/29 3,494,109 2/1970 Blazer et a1. 261/64 R 2,775,310 l2/1956 Shelton...,.;... 261/29 3,637,195 1/1972 Blazer et a1 261/64 R Primary ExaminerFrank W. Lutter Assistant Examiner-Steven H. Markowitz Attorney, Agent, or FirmHerbert E. Haynes, Jr.

[5 7] ABSTRACT An air conditioning apparatus is formedwith a sump barrier to provide a low-profile evaporative cooler which may be fabricated with auxiliary air inlet openings and controllable damper assemblies so that inlet 1 air may be optionally directed to a blower assembly I either through the cooler pads or through the auxiliary .inlet openings. The auxiliary inlet openings and damper assembliesallow the apparatus to be equipped with, or coupled to, various devices so that it may function in a variety of air conditioning capacities in combination with its evaporative cooling function.

20 Claims, 10 Drawing Figures )MENTEDAPR 91974 SHEET 2 [IF 6 p. Z 4Y%.

PATENTEUAPR 9mm I 3,802,493

- sum 3 or 6 1;: 95 INVENTOR. 404M Q 605774 AGENT PATENTEDAPR 9 m4 3.802.493

sum 5 0r 6 W476? S'UPPL INVENTOR. 404M 2 605272 I A GENT BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to air conditioning devices and more particularly to a low profile evaporative cooler having a novel configuration which is easily adapted to include various combinations of air conditioning elements.

2. Description of the Prior Art To combine any other type of air conditioning function with an evaporative cooler has always presented problems due to the water which flows through the cooler and is collected within the sump. Thiswater must be kept out of heating devices, ducts, air flow controlling devices, and the like.

Therefore, prior art air conditioning systems which utilize evaporative cooling in combination with other air conditioning elements generally employ one or more blowers, special purpose housings, and have ducting and air flow controlling devices. Accordingly, such previous systems have been relatively complicated, ex pensive, and unattractive devices.

One prior art combination air conditioning unit utilizes a special adapter housing which contains ducts, damper mechanisms and has an evaporative cooler attached to one side of the adapter housing and a heater mechanism attached to the other side. It may be seen that this type of structure requires three separate housings and two blower assemblies, and is thus relatively large and expensive.

Another prior art device is provided with a large special purpose housing having a centrifugal blower located therein. Evaporative cooling elements are located on one side of the blower and heating elements are positioned on the other side. The blower is enclosed within a special inner housing having damper devices mounted thereon. By selective positioning of the dampers, inlet air to the blower may be provided from either the cooler side or the heater side of the unit. It may be seen that this prior art unit is also relatively large and expensive.

It should be noted that neither of these prior art devices provide an apparatus which can be easily or economically manufactured as a basic device or manufactured in various combinations to meet specific requirements. Also these prior art devices are limited to specific combinations and do not lend themselves to the inclusion of other combinations.

Therefore, in view of the foregoing aneed exists for an air conditioning apparatus which may be manufactured in various combinations at reasonable cost and eliminates some of the problems associated with the prior art systems.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION ln accordance with the invention, a new and useful 1 air conditioning apparatus isprovided which has a cooler housing which is particularly adapted for roof top installation. As is common in structures of this type, the lower portion of the housing is pan-shaped to provide a sump for collecting the water which is used to wet the cooler pads. The cooler housing of the present invention is provided with a barrier located in the sump to separate it into a reservoir compartment and a duct passage. A centrifugal blower assembly is supported on the barrier and extends downwardly into the duct passage to position its outlet opening therein.

The novel structure of the sump barrier being formed' in the cooler housing makes a low-profile structure possible by allowing the inlet openings of the blower assembly to be positioned closer to the bottom of the housing than was heretofore possible. The prior art devices were limited in this respect due to the water level within the sump which could be drawn into the centrifugal housing and ducts by blower action.

If it is desired to combine the low-profile evaporative cooler with various combinations of other types of air conditioning apparatus, auxiliary air inlet openings are formed in the duct passage within the sump barrier. Suitably controlled air flow damper assemblies are mounted within the housing so that inlet air may be optionally directed to the inlets of the blower either from the cooler pads or from the auxiliary inlet openings.

The air conditioning apparatus of the present invention may be manufactured to include heat exchanger elements located within the auxiliary air inlet openings. A cooling or heating medium may be supplied to the heat exchangers from a conventional refrigeration device, heat pump, or from a water heating or cooling appliance.

The apparatus of the present invention may be operated as a humidifier in combination with its other air conditioning functions by drawing humidified air from the cooler pads through the damper assemblies which are properly positioned in response to signals received from a humidistat.

The inlet air routed to the blower assembly through the auxiliary inlets may be supplied thereto through an interposer duct structure mounted beneath the cooler housing. The interposer may be employed to optionally supply filtered fresh air or return air from the building to the auxiliary inlets.

Accordingly, it is one object of the present invention to provide a new and useful air conditioning apparatus.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a new and useful air conditioning apparatus in the form of a low-profile evaporative cooler.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a new and useful air conditioning apparatus which includes an evaporative cooler having a sump barrier formed therein for positioning the water reservoir ex- Another object of the present invention is to provide a new and useful air conditioning apparatus which is manufactured as a low-profile evaporative cooler and may be equipped at the time of manufacture with various other air conditioning elements.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a new and useful air conditioning apparatus which includes a low-profile evaporative cooler having auxiliary air inlet openings formed within a sump barrier and having suitably controlled damper means for optionally supplying inlet air to the, blower assembly from the cooler pads or from the auxiliary inlet openings.

A still further object of the present invention is to provide a new and useful air conditioning apparatus in the form of a low-prof1le evaporative cooler having auxiliary air inlet openings and controllable damper assemblies for allowing the apparatus to be combined with various other elements of air conditioning equipment which may be located within the auxiliary inlet openings or coupled thereto.

The foregoing and other objects of the present invention, the various features thereof, as well as the invention itself, may be more fully understood from the following description when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the air conditioning apparatus of the present invention incorporating the various features thereof;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged sectional view taken on the line 2-2 of FIG. 1 and illustrating the novel structural configuration of the evaporative cooler housing of the present invention;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary plan view taken on the line 33 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on the line 44 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view similar to FIG. 2 illustrating the auxiliary air inlet, interposer duct assembly and damper means of the present invention;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary sectional view illustrating a heat exchanger means positioned within the auxiliary air inlets of the apparatus of the present invention;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary side elevation partially broken away to illustrate the placement of the damper means and heat exchanger means within the structure of the present invention;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary view taken on the line 8-8 of FIG. 7 and illustrating the placement of control devices and plumbing lines for an automatic control system of the present invention;

FIG. 9 is a schematic illustration of the control system of FIG. 8; and

FIG. 10 is a schematic illustration of a modification of the control system of the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring more particularly to the drawings, FIGS. 1 through 4 illustrate an air conditioning structure indicated generally by reference numeral 12.

The air conditioning structure 12 includes all of the standard elements of a conventional down-draft evaporative cooler. It should be noted that these construction details are illustrative only and should not be construed as limitations to the apparatus of the present invention, as these elements may vary without affecting the operation of the novel apparatus.

The air conditioning structure 12 comprises a housing 13 having a top 14, a sump l5 and at least four vertically disposed corner posts 16. The housing 13 is formed into a unitary structure by welding or otherwise attaching the opposite ends of the posts 16 to the top 14 and the sump 15. A plurality of conventional evaporative cooler pads 17 are mounted on the housing 13 in a well-known manner.

As seen in FIG. 2, the sump 15 is positioned to collect the water which is employed to wet the cooler pads 17. Two well-known methods are employed to circulate the water. One method being to continuously supply and drain the water, with the other method being a supply-on-demand system with recirculating devices.

The former method of water circulation couples the water supply (not shown) directly to distributing tubes 18. The tubes 18 supply the water to troughs 19 which in turn wet the pads 17. The water runs down through the pads and into the sump and is drained therefrom by suitable connections (not shown).

The latter method of circulating water couples the supply (FIG. 9) to the sump 15. A conventional floatpump mechanism 20 is located in the sump 15 for maintaining the water at a predetermined level and recirculating it through the tubes 18, troughs 19, and pads 17.

In accordance with the present invention, sump 15 is provided with a sump barrier 23 which divides the sump into a reservoir compartment 24 and duct passage 25.

The sump barrier 23 is an upstanding endless structure having four walls 26, each of which has a flange 27 formed on its uppermost end.

A centrifugal blower assembly 30 is mounted within the housing 13 so that its centrifugal outlet 31 is directed downwardly through the sump 15 within the duct passage 25. Due to air control mechanisms to be hereinafter described, a special type of centrifugal blower assembly is desirable.

A centrifugal blower assembly suitable for use in the air conditioning apparatus of the present invention is fully disclosed in a copending US. patent application by the same inventor, entitled CENTRIFUGAL BLOWER ASSEMBLY, Ser. No. 213,992 filed Dec. 30, 1971 now US. Pat. No. 3,746,464. Also, a desirable rotor and arrangement for driving the rotor of the centrifugal blower assembly is fully disclosed in a copending U.S. patent application by the same inventor entitled A ROTOR FOR A BLOWER STRUC- TURE, Ser. No. 133,188 filed Apr. 12, 1971 now US. Pat. No. 3,702,741.

Since the rotor, drive for the rotor and the centrifugal blower assembly are fully described in the hereinbefore referenced US. patent applications, these structures will be only briefly described herein.

As seen best in FIGS. 2, 3, and 4, the centrifugal blower 30 is provided with a pair of spaced apart side walls 32 each of which is provided with an upper flange 33, a lower flange 34, a rear flange 35 and a front flange 36. Each of the side walls 32 has an axially disposed air inlet 37 formed therein and each inlet has a bearing 38 carried centrally thereof in suitable struts 39.

A rotor 40 is positioned between the axial inlets 37 and is journaled for rotation in the bearings 38.

A spiral shaped housing 41 is positioned between the side walls 32 and is suitably attached thereto. The spiral shaped housing 41 is provided with a removable segment 42, which allows access to the interior of the blower assembly 30 for servicing.

A drive motor 45 is attached to one of the side walls 32 and drives a V-belt 46 which passes into the interior of the blower assembly 30 through a slot provided for that purpose, and drivingly engages the rotor 40.

When the air conditioning apparatus 12 is used as an evaporative cooler, a large volume of output air from the blower assembly 30 is required. However, the various other air conditioning functions which may be performed by the apparatus, as will hereinafter be described, require various output volumes for efficient operation. To provide a wide range of output air volumes, an outlet damper 47 may be mounted within the blower assembly 30 adjacent to the outlet 31 thereof for controlling the volume of output air. The damper 47 is provided with a suitable positioning servo 48.

The centrifugal blower assembly 30 is positioned within the sump barrier 23 so that the outlet 31 of the blower is within the duct passage 25, and is flush with the lower surface of the housing 13. The side walls 32 of the blower extend between a pair of opposed walls 26 of the sump barrier so that the lower ends of rear flanges 35 and the front flanges 36 are in engagement with the barrier and are suitably secured thereto.

As seen best in FIGS. 2 and 3, the side walls 32 of the blower assembly 30 are parallel to and spaced inwardly from a second opposed pair of the side walls of the barrier 23. This spaced relationship forms the duct passage 25 into two portions with the first being defined as that area occupied by the outlet 31 of the blower 30. The second portion of the duct passage 25 are those areas which extend between the side walls 32 of the blower assembly 30 and the outwardly spaced side walls 26 of the sump barrier 23. In the embodiment seen best in FIGS. 2 and 3, it may be seen that this second portion of the duct passage 25 has a closed bottom formed of the material of the sump which extends inwardly from the barrier 23 to the blower 30. This spaced relationship allows the axial inlets 37 of the blower assem bly 30 to be located close to the bottom of the sump 15 without danger of water being drawn into the blower. Thus, the second portion of the duct passage may be defined as a baffle area.

The air conditioning apparatus 12 as thus far described provides a low-profile evaporative cooler assembly which may be easily and economically manufactured to include other air conditioning elements in combination therewith as will not be described.

As seen in FIGS. 5 through 8, when the air conditioning apparatus 12 is to be manufactured as a combination unit, the material of the sump 15 which extends inwardly from the barrier 23 to the blower is omitted to provide openings within the duct passage 25 which eliminates the baffle area as such and allows these second portions of the duct passage 25 to function as auxiliary air inlet openings 50. The auxiliary inlets 50 provide an alternate source of inlet air which may be directed to the axial inlets 37 of the blower 30.

Controllable upper and lower damper assemblies are provided for optionally directing the inlet air to the blower assembly 30 either through the cooler pads 17 or through the auxiliary inlets 50.

The upper damper assembly or means includes a pair of louver assemblies 53 and 54 which are mounted on opposite sides of the centrifugal blower assembly 30. The louver assemblies 53 and 54 are identical structures so only one will now be described in detail.

The louver assembly 53 includes a frame 55 having a main panel 56 and a pair of triangularly shaped end panels 57. A lower flange 58 is formed on the frame 55 which mates with and is attached to the flange 27 of the barrier 23. An upper flange 59 is provided on the frame 55 which attaches to the upper flange 33 of the side walls 32 of the blower assembly 30. The end panels 57 of the frame 55 overlap the front and rear flanges 36 and 35 of the side walls 32 and are secured thereto. The frame 55 is attached to the barrier 23 and the blower assembly 30 such as by spot welding, sheet metal screws or other suitable attaching devices.

The main panel 56 is provided with an enlarged opening 60 formed therein so that inlet air directed to the blower assembly 30 from the cooler pads 17 will pass through this opening. I

A plurality of louvers 64 are positioned internally and adjacent to the opening 60. Each of the louvers 64 is journalled for rotation on its opposite ends in the end panels 57 of the frame 55.

The individual louvers-64 of the louver assembly 53 are each provided with a lever 65 which is connected to a rod 66 for simultaneous operation thereof. Similarly, the louvers 64 of the louver assembly 54 are each provided with a lever 65 which couples them to a rod 67.

As will hereinafter be described in detail the louver assemblies 53 and 54 may be individually actuated, or by interconnecting their respective rods 66 and 67 they may be adapted for simultaneous operation. Also as will be described, the louver assemblies 53 and 54 may be adapted to operate as staged dampers, that is, they may be positioned at various locations between fully open and fully closed.

The lower damper assembly or means includes a pair of louver assemblies 70 and 71 which are mounted on opposite sides of the centrifugal blower 30 within the auxiliary inlets 50. The louver assemblies 70 and 71 are identical structures, therefore only one will be described.

The louver assembly 70 includes a pan-shaped frame 72 formed to fit within the auxiliary inlet 50 so as to contact and be secured on three of its sides to the barrier 23, and its fourth side contacts and is attached to the side wall 32 of the blower assembly 30.

The pan-shaped frame 72 is provided with an opening 73 formed therein through which the inlet air passes on its way to the centrifugal blower 30 from the auxiliary inlet 50.

A plurality of louvers 74 are pivotably journaled on their opposite ends in the frame 72 adjacent to the opening 73 and are movable between an open and a closed position and may operate as staged dampers.

The louvers 74 of the louver assemblies 70 and 71 may be connected for individual operation or may be connected for simultaneous operation as will be hereinafter described.

It may now be easily seen that the air conditioning apparatus 12 with the upper and lower damper means mounted therein provide alternate inlet air paths to the blower assembly 30. Therefore, the air conditioning structure 12 may be easily formed into a combination unit.

As hereinbefore mentioned the air conditioning structure 12 is best adapted for roof top mounting, thus the housing 13 may be supportingly positioned adjacent to a roof 75 (FIG. on an interposer duct structure 80 or a conventional supporting frame (not shown).

The roof 75 is provided with a supply duct 81 and a pair of laterally disposed return ducts 82. The ducts 81 and 82 may be coupled directly to the outlet 31 and to the auxiliary inlets 50 of the air conditioning structure 12.

The interposer duct structure 80 is provided with a supply spanner duct 83 which connects the outlet 31 of the blower 30 to the supply duct 81 provided in the roof 75. A pair of return spanner ducts 84 are laterally disposed with respect to the supply spanner duct 83 and are adapted to couple return air from the return ducts 82, provided in the roof 75 to the auxiliary inlet openings 50 of the housing 13.

Each of the return spanner ducts 84 is provided with a branch duct 85 extending laterally therefrom. The branch ducts 85 are each provided with a filter 87 mounted in the outermost end thereof so that filtered fresh air may be routed to the blower 30. The filters 87 are preferably fabricated of a material such as activated charcoal so as to extract air born pollutants. The filters 87 are positioned within the branch ducts 85 by stop brackets 88 against which the filters 87 are positioned. A louvered door 89 is hingingly mounted on the outmost end of each of the branch ducts 85 to hold the filters 87 against the stops 88.

A damper door 90 is provided within each of the return spanner ducts 84, and are pivotably swingable about suitable mounting pins 91 to optionally open and close the branch ducts 85 and the return spanner ducts 84.

On the left hand side of the illustration of FIG. 5, the damper door 90 is shown in a position which closes its adjacent branch duct 85 and opens the return spanner duct 84 so that return air from the point of use is directed to the blower assembly 30.

On the right hand side of the same figure, the damper door 90 is shown as closing its adjacent return spanner duct 84 and opening the branch duct 85 so that filtered fresh air is routed to the blower assembly 30.

The damper doors 90 may be provided with appropriate control linkages (not shown) to allow either individual or ganged operation thereof.

As best seen in FIGS. 6 and 7, a heat exchanger means 95 may be mounted in each of the auxiliary inlet openings 50 of the housing 13. The heat exchanger means 95 may be self-contained appliances operable by conventional methods such as natural gas, electricity or the like.

Due to the proximity of a highly humidified atmosphere and the protective devices that would be needed for protecting either a gas or electric appliance and to eliminate the need for a combustion appliance on the roof of a building, the preferred system is to employ a radiator type of heat exchanger which receives a temperature conditioned medium from as remote source as will be hereinafter described. This preferred form is desirable not only because it does not require protective devices, it is also less expensive and virtually maintenance free. Each of the heat exchanger devices 95 are in the form of a radiator structure having an elongated coiled tube 96 upon which a plurality of radiating fins 97 are positioned. The heat exchangers are suitably mounted in the lower most ends of their respective auxiliary inlets 50 and are thus positioned below the lower damper means.

Reference is now made to FIGS. 8 and 9 wherein a first automatic control system for the upper and lower damper means is illustrated.

This first control system is a fluid actuated system and is suitable when the apparatus doesnt require staged operation of the damper assemblies.

The louver assemblies 53 and 54 are provided with the rods 66 and 67 respectively which adapt the individual louvers 64 of these assemblies for ganged or simultaneous operation as previously described. As seen best in FIGS. 5, 7 and 8, the rod 66 of louver assembly 53 is pivotably connected to a pivot plate 100, and the rod 67 of the louver assembly 54 is similarly connected to a pivot plate 101. The pivot plate 100 and 101 are each connected by a pivot pin 102 to the inner surface of the end panels 57 of the frames 55 of their respective louver assemblies 53 and 54.

As seen in FIG. 8, a control shaft 103 is slidably journaled for horizontally disposed reciprocal movement in suitable bushings 104 provided in each of the side walls 32 of the blower assembly 30. The control shaft 103 is connected on its opposite ends to the pivot plates 100 and 101 by pins 105.

Reciprocal movements of the control shaft 103 will cause the pivot plates 100 and 101 to swing about their pivot pins 102 and thus convert the horizontal movements of the control shaft 103 into substantially vertically reciprocal movements of the rods 66 and 67.

As seen in FIGS. 5 and 8, the control shaft 103 is illustrated at one end of its reciprocal travel, and that position will hold the louver assemblies 53 and 54 in the closed position. Movement of the control shaft to the other end of its reciprocal travel (to the right of FIG. 8) will cause the pivot plate 101 to move in the direction of arrow 106, and will cause the pivot plate 100 to move in the direction of the arrow 107.

Reciprocal movement of the control shaft 103 is produced by a servo mounted on the inner surface of the barrier 23. The other end of the link 111 is connected to the control shaft 103. Linear motion of the output shaft 1 13 of servo 1 10 will cause the link 111 to pivot about its mounting pin 112 and thus laterally reciprocate the control shaft 103.

A lower damper control shaft 115 is suitably coupled on its opposite ends to the lower louver assemblies 70 and 71, and operates in a similar manner to the previously described control shaft 103.

As seen in FIG. 8 the control shaft 115 is slidably journaled for horizontally disposed reciprocal motion in suitable bushings 116.

Reciprocal movements of the control shaft 115 are produced by a servo suitably mounted on an internal surface of the sump barrier 25. An output shaft 121 of the servo 120 is coupled to a pivot link 122 which operates in the same manner as the previously described link 111 to produce the reciprocal motion of control shaft 115.

It should be noted that both of the servos 110 and 120 are shown in the retracted position and that the upper louver assemblies 53 and 54 are closed and the lower louver assemblies 70 and 71 are open in this position of the servos. The servos 110 and 120 are adapted for simultaneous operation, as will hereinafter be described, so that the upper louver assemblies 53 and 54 are open when the lower louver assemblies 70 and 71 are closed and these assemblies will switch positions upon an actuation of the servos 110 and 120.

FIG. 9 is a schematic illustration of the first automatic control system.

Inlet to this automatic control system may be obtained from a domestic water supply and coupled to a supply line l25. The line 125 is provided with a tee 126 which couples the water supply to a temperature conditioning system 127 and to a control system 128.

The water supply is coupled from tee 126 to the control system 128 by a line 129 which has a shutoff valve 130 therein. The water is coupled from the line 129 to the float-pump 20 by a line 131 thus supplying watert thesump 15 as previously described.

When the shutoff valve 130 is opened by a user the air conditioning apparatus will operate as an evaporative cooler. Therefore, not only must water be suppliedto the sump 15, the upper louver assemblies 53 and 54 must be opened, and the lower louver assemblies 70 and 71 must be closed.

To automatically accomplish the proper positioning of the louver assemblies 53, 54, 70 and 71, the servos 110 and 120 are connected by lines 132 and 133 to the supply line 129 so that when shutoff valve 130 is opened water is simultaneously directed to the sump l and to the servos 110 and 120. As seen in FIG. 9, each of the servos 110 and 120 is provided with a piston 135 which is biased toward a retracted position by suitable springs 136.

It may now be seen that when water under pressure is applied to the control system 128, the servos 110 and 120 are actuated to an extended position and will thus automatically position the louver assemblies 53, 54, 70 and 71, so that inlet air is supplied through the cooler pads 17 to the blower assembly 30.

When the water pressure is removed from the control system 128 byclosing the shutoff valve 130 the water trapped within the control system will bleed into the sump and thus allow the springs 156 to return the servos 110 and 120 to their retracted positions.

The water in the supply line 125 is coupled to a temperature conditioning appliance 140 of the temperature conditioning system 127. The temperature conditioning appliance 140 may be a conventional hot water heater.

A supply line 141 from the appliance 140 is coupled to a pump 142 which supplies the hot water to the inlets 143 of the heat exchangers 95. The heated water circulates through the tubes 96 of the heat exchangers 95, it is returned through outlet lines 144 to the appliance 140.

The pump 142 may be controlled by a conventional thermostat 145 located at the point of use.

It should be noted that the temperature conditioning appliance 140 could be a cooling device which would chill the water circulated through the heat exchangers 95. Also a pair of temperature conditioning appliances (not shown) 'could be suitably connected to the heat exchangers 95 for optionally supplying either heated or chilled water thereto.

It should be understood that the temperature conditioning appliance 140 could take the form of a conventional heater, refrigeration unit or heat pump. In these instances the water supply would not be coupled to the appliance 140, but could be employed solely in the control system 128.

A second type of control system is schematically illustrated in FIG. 10. This second system will accomplish all that the previously described first control systern accomplishes with the added features of allowing the apparatus 12 to function as a humidifier, and increasing the efficiency of the unit by controlling the heat transfer therein.

Conventional electrically operated servo motors 150 are coupled to each of the upper louver assemblies 53 and 54. The servo motors 150 respond to signals received from a humidistat 151 to position their respective louver assemblies in accordance with the signals received. The louver assemblies are thus properly positioned to allow controlled amounts of humidified air from the cooler pads 17 to enter into the blower 30.

Similar electrically operated servo motors 155, under control of a thermostat 156, may be coupled to the lower louver assemblies and 71 to control the volume of air passing over the heat exchangers and thus control the heat transfer.

While the principles of the invention have now been made clear in an illustrative embodiment, there will be immediately obvious to those skilled in the art, many modifications of structure, arrangement, proportions, the elements, materials, and components, used in the practice of the invention, and otherwise, which are particularly adapted for specific environments and operating requirements without departing from those princiv ples. The appended claims are therefore intended to cover and embrace any such modifications within the limits only of the true spirit and scope of the invention.

sembly positioned to extend downwardly into the duct passage so that the outlet thereof passes through the duct passage, said barrier means comprising an endless upstanding wall with the portion of the wall which faces the axial inlet side of the blower assembly laterally spaced therefrom to provide a baffle area having a closed bottom, the baffle area extending between the laterally spaced portion of the wall and the axial inlet side of said blower assembly to prevent water from the reservoir compartment from entering the axial inlet side.

of said blower assembly. 2. An air conditioning apparatus as claimed in claim 1 wherein the endless upstanding wall which forms said barrier means comprises a first opposed pair of side walls adapted to support the blower assembly and a second opposed pair of side walls spaced laterally from opposite sides of the blower assembly.

3. An air conditioning apparatus comprising: a. a housing having at least one inlet opening formed in the side thereof for demountably receiving an evaporative cooler pad, said housing having a sump formed in the lower portion thereof;

b. a multisided barrier within the sump of said housing, said barrier formed into an endless upstanding wall for providing a reservoir compartment externally of said barrier and a duct passage internally thereof; and

c. a blower assembly supportingly attached to said barrier and extending downwardly into the duct passage formed internally of said barrier to position the outlet of said blower assembly therein, at least one side of said blower assembly spaced inwardly from said barrier to provide an auxiliary inlet opening therebetween.

4. An air conditioning apparatus as claimed in claim 3 wherein said blower assembly includes a pair of spaced apart side walls positioned to extend into the duct passage, the side walls attached at their respective opposite ends to perpendicularly disposed portions of said barrier for supporting said blower assembly, the side walls of said blower assembly each parallel to and spaced inwardly from other portions of said barrier to provide an auxiliary inlet opening on each side of said blower assembly.

5. An air conditioning apparatus as claimed in claim 3 wherein said barrier has at least four sides an opposed parallel pair of which provide support for said blower assembly and another opposed parallel pair of which are each laterally spaced from opposite sides of said blower assembly to form an auxiliary inlet opening on each side of said blower assembly.

6. An air conditioning apparatus as claimed in claim 3 further comprising:

a. upper damper means mounted between said barrier and said blower assembly for optionally opening and closing an air path to said blower assembly from the evaporative cooler pad of said housing; and

b. lower damper means mounted within the auxiliary inlet opening formed internally of said barrier for optionally opening and closing an air path to said blower assembly from the auxiliary inlet opening.

7. An air conditioning apparatus as claimed in claim 3 further comprising an output damper means mounted within said blower assembly adjacent to the outlet thereof for controlling the volume of output air.

8. An air conditioning apparatus comprising:

a. an evaporative cooler housing including at least one cooler pad mounted in the side thereof for providing a first airinlet path into the interior of said housing, said housing having a sump formed in the bottom thereof;

b. barrier means formed in the sump of said housing for providing a reservoir compartment laterally disposed with respect to said barrier means and for providing a duct passage internally thereof;

c. a blower assembly supportingly attached to said barrier means and extending into the duct passage to position the outlet of said blower assembly therein, at least one side of said blower assembly spaced inwardly from said barrier means to form an auxiliary air inlet therebetween for providing a second air inlet path into the interior of said housing;

d. an upper damper means mounted between said barrier means and the upper end of the inwardly spaced side of said blower assembly for optionally opening and closing the first air inlet path between the cooler pad and said blower assembly;

e. a lower damper means mounted within the auxiliary air inlet opening for optionally opening and closing the second air inlet path between the auxiliary air inlet opening and said blower assembly; and

f. control means coupled to said upper and said lower damper means for proper positioning thereof in accordance with the desired air inlet path.

9. An air conditioning apparatus as claimed in claim 8 wherein said upper damper means comprises:

a. a main panel having an opening formed therethrough;

b. a pair of end panels attached to opposite ends of said main panel; and

c. a plurality of louvers rotatably journaled adjacent to the opening formed in said main panel for optionally opening and closing the opening formed in said main panel.

10. An air conditioning apparatus as claimed in claim 8 wherein said lower damper means comprises:

a. a frame having an opening formed therein; and

b. a plurality of louvers rotatably journaled adjacent to the opening formed in said frame for optionally opening and closing the opening formed in said frame.

11. An air conditioning apparatus comprising:

a. an evaporative cooler housing having a sump formed in the bottom thereof;

b. barrier means formed in the sump of said housing for providing a reservoir compartment externally of said barrier means and a duct passage internally thereof;

c. a blower assembly supportingly mounted on said barrier means and extending into the duct passage to position the outlet of said blower assembly therein, said blower assembly having two opposed sides which are each spaced inwardly with respect to said barrier means for providing a pair of auxiliary inlet openings within the duct passage;

d. a pair of upper louver assemblies each positioned adjacent to a different one of the opposed sides of said blower assembly, each of said upper louver assemblies extending between said barrier means and the upper end of its adjacent side of said blower;

e. a pair of lower louver assemblies each positioned within a different one of the auxiliary inlet openings provided in the duct passage;

f. a first servo means coupled to said pair of upper louver assemblies for controlling movement thereof; and

g. a second servo means coupled to said pair of lower louver assemblies for controlling movement thereof.

12. An air conditioning apparatus as claimed in claim 11 wherein said first servo means comprises a servo motor the output shaft of which is coupled to each of said pair of upper louver assemblies for simultaneous operation thereof.

13. An air conditioning apparatus as claimed in claim 11 wherein said second servo means comprises a servo motor the output shaft of which is coupled to each of said pair of lower louver assemblies for simultaneous operation thereof.

14. An air conditioning apparatus asclaimed in claim 11 wherein said first servo means comprises a separate servo motor for each of said pair of upper louver assemblies, each of said servo motors coupled to their respective louver assemblies and adapted to control the positions thereof for staged operation.

15. An air conditioning apparatus as claimed in claim 16. An air conditioning apparatus as claimed in claim 11 further including heat exchanger means mounted within the auxiliary inlet openings for controlling the temperature of the air passing therethrough.

17. An air conditioning apparatus as claimed in claim 11 further comprising:

a. an interposer duct structure mounted below said evaporative cooler housing;

b. a supply spanner duct formed in said duct structure and coupled to the outlet of said blower assembly;

c. a pair of return spanner ducts formed in said duct structure a different one of said return spanner ducts laterally disposed from opposite sides of said supply spanner duct, said return spanner ducts coupled to the auxiliary inlet openings provided in the duct passage of said cooler housing;

d. a branch duct laterally extending from each of said return spanner ducts. each of said branch ducts having a filter mounted therein; and

e. damper means mounted in each of said return spanner ducts for optionally directing air to the auxiliary openings from either said branch ducts or 35 said return spanner ducts.

18. An air conditioning apparatus comprising:

a. a housing having at least one inlet opening formed in the side thereof for demountably receiving an evaporative cooler pad, said housing having a sump formed in the lower portion thereof;

b. a multisided barrier within the sump of said housing, said barrier formed into an endless upstanding wall for providing a reservoir compartment externally of said barrier and a duct passage internally thereof; and

c. a blower assembly having at least one axial inlet side, said assembly supportingly attached to said barrier and extending downwardly into the duct passage formed internally of said barrier to position the outlet of said blower assembly therein, said at least one axial inlet side of said blower assembly spaced inwardly from said barrier to provide a baffle area having a closed bottom therebetween, arranged to prevent water from the reservoir compartment from entering the axial inlet side of said blower assembly.

19. An air conditioning apparatus as claimed in claim 18 wherein said blower assembly includes a pair of spaced apart side walls positioned to extend into the duct passage, the side walls attached at their respective opposite ends to perpendicularly disposed portions of said barrier for supporting said blower assembly, the side walls of said blower assembly each parallel to and spaced inwardly from other portions of said barrier to provide a baffle area having a closed bottom on each side of said blower assembly.

20. An air conditioning apparatus as claimed in claim 18 wherein said barrier has at least four sides, an opposed parallel pair of which provide support for said blower assembly and another opposed parallel pair of which are each laterally spaced from opposite sides of said blower assembly to form a baffle area having a closed bottom on each side of said blower assembly.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3900301 *Jul 16, 1974Aug 19, 1975Metalul Rosu Cluj IntreprinderAir treatment apparatus
US3960527 *Nov 22, 1974Jun 1, 1976Goettl Adam DAir delivery and treatment apparatus
US4066064 *Apr 8, 1976Jan 3, 1978Mcgraw-Edison CompanyKitchen ventilator damper actuator and control
US4101609 *Oct 5, 1976Jul 18, 1978Sumrow Paul ECover holder for evaporative cooler
US4132087 *Oct 3, 1977Jan 2, 1979Goettl Adam DAir conditioning assembly
US4309365 *Mar 3, 1980Jan 5, 1982David Van NessNon-corrosive, non-staining evaporative cooler
US4312819 *Nov 18, 1980Jan 26, 1982Leyland Billy MAir cooling apparatus
US4361525 *Nov 2, 1981Nov 30, 1982Leyland Billy MAir cooling apparatus
US4738305 *Dec 9, 1986Apr 19, 1988Bacchus Rockney DAir conditioner and heat dispenser
US5143655 *Jul 8, 1991Sep 1, 1992Duracraft CorporationEfficiently packaged humidifier device
US6502414 *Apr 27, 2001Jan 7, 2003General Shelters Of Texas, S.B., Ltd.Cooler housing apparatus and method of making the same
US20100242516 *May 13, 2010Sep 30, 2010Sungji Air-Conditioning Technology Co., LtdModular cooling tower
Classifications
U.S. Classification165/60, 261/105, 261/24, 261/151, 261/72.1, 165/63, 261/137, 261/96, 62/314, 261/64.1
International ClassificationF24F11/08, F24F6/02, F24F6/04, F24F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationF24F3/00, F24F6/04, F24F11/08
European ClassificationF24F6/04, F24F3/00, F24F11/08