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Publication numberUS3802904 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 9, 1974
Filing dateMar 16, 1970
Priority dateMar 16, 1970
Publication numberUS 3802904 A, US 3802904A, US-A-3802904, US3802904 A, US3802904A
InventorsJ Morrison
Original AssigneeJ Morrison
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of making a decorative article
US 3802904 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 A l m1 3,802,904

Morrison Apr. 9, 1974 METHOD OF MAKING A DECORATIVE Publishing Company, 1948, pg. 20.

ARTICLE [76] Inventor: g 5' f z i ig 52nd Primary Examiner-Ralph S. Kendall ew or Assistant E.raminerM. F. Esposito [22] Filed: Mar. 16, 1970 Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Breitenfeld & Levine [21] Appl. No.: 29,371

[52] US. Cl. 117/37 R, 117/3.1, 117/361, ABSTRACT 35/26 [51] Int. Cl B44d 1/02, B41m 3/12- A transfer sheet, which may be a sheet of paper bear- [58] Field of Search 117/37, 3.1, 36.1; 35/26 ing a grease-impenetrable coating, is rubbed with a writing instrument, e.g., a wax-base crayon. The cray- [56] References Cited on-bearing surface of the transfer sheet is placed in UNITED STATES PATENTS opposition to a surface to be decorated and a rubbing pressure is applied to the opposed surfaces to transfer the crayon material to the surface to be decorated. The transfer sheet may rest on a textured surface while being rubbed by the crayon. A guide sheet for guiding the'rubbing pressure-may be placed over the surface to be decorated, and the transfer sheet placed between the guide sheet and surface to .be decorated.

OTHER PUBLICATIONS Todd, .1. P., Tricks Every Boy Can Do, N.Y., Hart 11 Claims, 8-Drawing Figures PATENTED APR 9 9 sum 1 0P2 INVENTORI JOHN R. MORRISON BY 2 TTORNEYS MK (i PATENTEDAPR 9 I974 3802.904

sum 2 or 2 /4 a m 2 \C/ A m\\\\\ \KQ FIG. 7 B

ATTORNEYS 1 METHOD OF MAKING A. DECORATIVE ARTICLE This invention relates to decorating surfaces, and

.more particularly toa method of applying coloring matter in the form of a writing or drawing instrument, e.g., an ordinary wax-base crayon, to a surface.

In the description which follows, the writing instrument will be referred to as a crayon. However, it is to be understood that the writing instrument may be any implement, having the characteristics of a wax-base crayon, i.e., the capacity to be rubbed against the surtic or synthetic base have been used successfully.

Conventionally, crayon coloring is performed by rubbing a crayon stick directly against the surface to be decorated.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a method of applying crayon coloring matter'to a surface by transferring the crayon material from a transfer sheet to which the crayon material has first been applied.

Generally speaking, the method of this invention involves rubbing a surface of the transfer sheet with a wax-base crayon, placing the crayon-bearing surface of the transfer sheet in opposed relation to the surface to be decorated, and rubbing either the transfer sheet or the rear face of the surface to be decorated to cause the crayon to be released from the transfer sheet and applied to the surface to be decorated. Transfer of the crayon in this way takes place only in the area to which the rubbing pressure has been applied.

Among the advantages offered by the present inven- I tion are the following: 7

1. There is greater control of application of the crayon to the surface to be decorated. Thus, with an ordinary crayon stick only relatively thick lines or blocks of color can be applied. With the present invention, pressure can be applied between the crayon-bearing surface of the transfer sheet'and the-surface to be deco-' rated, with a pointed tool. In this way, distinct borders of crayon colored areas can be achieved, and very thin crayon lines can be drawn.

2. Crayon coloring can rapidly be applied to the surface to be decorated in an unlimited number of patterns. If the transfer sheet is rested on a textured surface while the crayon is appliedto it, application of the crayon will be in a pattern conforming to'the texture. The crayon is thereafter transferred to the surface to be decorated in the same pattern.

3.'Crayon colors can be overlapped on the surface to be decorated without having the colors blend into one another, as happens when a crayon stick of one color is rubbed over crayon material of another color previ-' ously applied to the surface. to be decorated. With'the present transfer method, subsequently applied crayon. material lies right ontop of previously applied crayon material. I

A feature of the invention is the use of a guide sheet adapted to be laid over the surface to be decorated, bearing an illustration divided into a number of discrete areas. Each area bears some indicia indicating, for example, which color and/or texture should be used to color the corresponding area of the surface to be decorated. A transfer sheet to which a particular color and textures.

Additionalfeatures and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description in which reference is made to the accompanying drawings. V

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the items which may be provided to carry out the present method; I

FIG. 2 is a perspective view illustrating the application of crayon to a transfer sheet;

FIG; 3 is a perspective view showing a crayonbearing transfer sheet being rubbed, through a guide sheet, against a sheet to be decorated;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary perspective view of the sheet to be decorated after the transfer of crayon material to FIG. 5 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view on an enlarged scale, taken along line 5'5 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view showing a crayon being rubbed on a transfer sheet while the latter rests on a resilient surface;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view showing a crayon being'rubbed on a transfer sheet while the latter rests on a textured surface; and

FIG. 8 is a view similar to FIG. 4 showing the sheet to be decorated after application of textured crayon pattern to it.

The procedure chosen to illustrate the present invention may be carried outwith the items shown in FIG. 1. In the present example, the surface to be decorated is the upper face 10 of a piece of relatively stiff and heavy cardboard 11. However, the surface to be decorated can be any surface capable of accepting crayon. Overlying the board 11 is a guide sheet 12, preferably formed of a transparent material such as acetate. The guide sheetneed not necessarily be transparent; it could be translucent, such as a' sheet of tracing paper, or even opaque. The guide sheet, however, must be thin enough so that pressure applied to its upper surface is transmitted through to the surface 10 beneath.

'Guide sheet 12 carries an illustration 13, in the present embodiment. a; picture of a fish, at a location wherein it can be'seen by the user. The illustration 13 is divided into several discrete areas, each area bearing a numeral, in this case the'nurnerals 1-6 are used. The

numerals are keyed to a color chart (not shown) or to such as a suitable adhesive along edge secures guide Paper of the type used to wrap butter has been used successfully. This is parchment paper provided with a grease-resistant surface coating.

A resilient pad 19, such as a thin sheet of foam rubber or foam plastic covered by a smooth plastic layer, has been found useful under some circumstances when it is desired to apply a solid over-all crayon coloring to a transfer sheet. In such a case, the transfer sheet is rested on pad 19 (FIG. 6) while a crayon is rubber over its surface. Under some conditions, simply resting the transfer sheet on a hard smooth surface (FIG. 2) while rubbing a crayon over it yields satisfactory results.

A block 20 having different surface textures is also shown in FIG. 1. In the present example, the surface of one half 21 of block 20 has a window screen texture, and the surface of the other half 22 has a pebbled texture. It will be appreciatedthat if a transfer sheet 18 is rested on the surface of block part 21 (FIG. 7) and its surface is rubbed with a crayon 14, the crayon material is'applied to the surface of the transfer sheet in a window screen pattern. Thus, literally any textured surface may be used as a base for supporting a transfer sheet :18, while the latter is rubbed by a crayon l4, and the 4 being rubbed with a crayon, overall rubbing of area 6 of the guide sheet would have resulted in transfer of crayon material 32 (FIG. 8) in a pattern.

In the case of an areasuch as the area bearing numeral 3, a transfer sheet carrying solid or patterned crayon material may be used first, and the area 3 rubbed with tool 25, and thereafter a transfer sheet bearing a pattern of crayon material which may be identified by numeral 7, preferably a color different from the color used first, is used and the area 3 is rubbed again. As a result an overlying pattern of color is applied to the first crayon material transferred to surface 10 in the area 3. If desired, the same area 3 can be rubbed again with a third transfer sheet bearing yet a different pattern and color. As a result of transfers of crayon by rubbing of all the areas of illustration 13, a

. composite picture of a fish, made up of-different colors with a tool, such as tool 25', to transfer allthe crayon In use, a transfer sheet 18 is placed on a flat hard surface (FIG. 2) or a resilient surface (FIG. 6), a crayon 14 of appropriate color is selected, and the surface of the transfer sheet 18 is rubbed to apply a layer of crayon material 29 to the surface of the transfer sheet.

The hard flatsu'rface or resilient surface are used'when a solid area of color is desired on the transfer sheet. If a pattern of crayon material 30 (FIG. 7) is desired, the transfer sheet is rested on a textured'surface.

The transfer sheet 18 is then placed between the board VII and guide sheet 12 (FIG. 3) with its crayonbearing face in opposed relation to the surface 10 to be decorated One of the areas of the illustration 13 carried-bythe guide sheet l2-is then rubbed by means of the tool 25 (see FIGS. 3 and 5). In FIG. 3, the area labeled with the numeral 6, and representing one fin of the fish, is shown being rubbed by the rigid end 27 of the tool. If the color selection system mentioned above is being used, the transfer sheet will have been rubbedwith a crayon 14 of the color corresponding to numeral material carried by the transfer sheet in that area to the surface to be decorated, or a pointed tool can be used to selectively apply pressure in an area, whereby a design comprising very thin crayon lines is applied to the surface to be decorated. A

A modified way of practicing the invention should be mentioned, in which the lower face of guide sheet 12 is the surface to be decorated. Accordingly, a transfer sheet 18 is placed beneath the guide sheet with the crayon-bearing surface of 'the transfer sheet facing the lower face of the guide sheet. In this case, the board 11 is eliminated, and the lower face of the transfer sheet rests on a support surface. When rubbing pressure is applied to the upper face of the guide sheet, the crayon material 29 or 30 is-transferred to the lower face of the guide sheet. If the guide sheet is transparent, the crayon can be viewed through the upper face of the sheet.

It should also be mentioned that since the crayon material is completely released from the transfer sheet 18, the sheet can be reused. Thus, the'same transfer sheet can be used, at differenttimes, to transfer different colors and/or different patterns of crayon to the surface to be decorated. v

The invention has been shown and described in preferred form only, and by way of example, and many variations may be made in the invention which will still be comprised within its spirit; It is understood, therefore, that'the -invention is not limited to any specific form or embodiment except insofar as such limitations are included in the appended claims.

What is claimed is: l. A method of making a decorative article comprising the steps of a. providing an article having a surface to be decorated, I b. providinga transfersheet having a surface which accepts a wax-like or grease-like coating without permitting such coating to penetrate through the surface, c. rubbing said surface of the transfer sheet with a writing instrument having the characteristics of awax-base crayon while the transfer sheet rests on a textured surface, whereby the crayon-like material is applied to the transfer sheet in a pattern conforming to that of the textured surface,

d. placing the crayon-bearing surface of the transfer sheet in opposition to-the surface to be decorated, and

e. applying a rubbing pressure to an area of said opposed surfaces,

whereby the crayon material carried by the'transfer sheet in the rubbed area is transferred to the surface to be decorated in the pattern conforming to that of the textured surface.

-2. A method as defined in claim 1 wherein the rubbing pressure is applied by rubbing the surface of the transfer sheet opposite the crayon-bearing surface.

3. A method as defined in claim 1 wherein the article is a piece of sheet material, and the rubbing pressure is applied by rubbing the surface of the sheet material opposite the surface to be decorated.

4. A method as defined in claim 1 wherein the rubbing pressure is applied by rubbing the transfer sheet or the article with a rigid tool.

5. A method as defined in claim 1 including the step .of resting the transfer sheet on a resilient base while rubbing its surface with the writing instrument.

6. A method as defined in claim 1 including the stepof transferring crayon-like material from the transfer sheet to an area of the surface to be decorated which has previously received crayon-like material from a transfer sheet.

7. A method as defined in claim 6 wherein the subsequent transfer is of crayon-like material carried by the transfer sheet in a textured pattern.

8. A method as defined in claim 1 wherein said transfer sheet is a paper sheet at least one surface of which bears a grease-impenetrable coating.

9. A method as defined in claim 1 including the steps of f. providing a guide sheet bearing an illustration having a plurality of discrete areas,

g. placing the transfer sheet between the guide sheet and the surface to be decorated with the surface of the transfer sheet bearing the crayon-like material in contact with the surface to be decorated, and

h. rubbing the exposed surface of the guide sheet within one of the discrete areas,

whereby different areas may be rubbed when different transfer sheets are used to create a composite illustration on the surface to be decorated.

10. A method as defined in claim 9 wherein the guide sheet bears indicia in the discrete areas indicating the particular type of crayon-bearing transfer sheet to be used when each area is rubbed.

l l. A method as defined in claim 9 wherein the guide sheet is transparent.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3840113 *Apr 13, 1973Oct 8, 1974Bartleson FTotem name batik kit
US4584042 *Nov 8, 1984Apr 22, 1986Wandroik Walter JArtistic method and kit for creating an art form
US4875953 *Nov 30, 1988Oct 24, 1989Lloyd Christopher AImpression printing process for animals and children
US5196237 *Sep 27, 1991Mar 23, 1993May Brian WMethod for coloring fabric with crayon
US5676549 *Feb 6, 1995Oct 14, 1997Toy Biz, Inc.Toy finger painting apparatus
US6217336 *Dec 9, 1998Apr 17, 2001Camp Kazoo, Ltd.Methods and kits for painting walls
US6293799 *Apr 3, 2000Sep 25, 2001Walker, Ii Randall L.Method of applying pigmented material to a screen to create an artistic image and the resulting pigmented screen
US6343934 *Nov 21, 1997Feb 5, 2002Theodore David Johnson, Jr.Method and apparatus for transferring or applying a drawing to a surface
US6926527Jan 15, 2002Aug 9, 2005Theodore David Johnson, Jr.Method and apparatus for transferring or applying a drawing to a surface
US7021939 *Feb 25, 2003Apr 4, 2006Arnulfo HernandezSystem and method for determining area of irregular or complex shapes
US8011929 *Feb 6, 2008Sep 6, 2011Teng-Kuei ChenMethod for coloring a coloring card
US20040229193 *May 14, 2003Nov 18, 2004Larry WittmeyerColoring paper having adhesive
WO1996024496A1 *Feb 6, 1996Aug 15, 1996Toy Biz IncToy finger painting apparatus
WO1999036275A1 *Jan 13, 1999Jul 22, 1999Henry R MartinezSystem and method for transferring photographic images onto leather and like materials
Classifications
U.S. Classification427/282, 434/84, 428/914, 427/288
International ClassificationB44C1/17
Cooperative ClassificationB44C1/1733, Y10S428/914
European ClassificationB44C1/17H