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Publication numberUS3804281 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 16, 1974
Filing dateJun 21, 1971
Priority dateJun 21, 1971
Publication numberUS 3804281 A, US 3804281A, US-A-3804281, US3804281 A, US3804281A
InventorsT Eckdahl
Original AssigneePlastics Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Beverage cruet
US 3804281 A
Abstract
A cruet is formed of a receptacle and an outer supporting sleeve. The receptacle tapers downwardly and inwardly so as to be of smallest diameter at its lower end. The sleeve tapers inwardly and upwardly to engage the receptacle at its upper extremity. The spacing between the receptacle and sleeve is such as to accomodate the upper end of an identical cruet so that the cruets may be nested together through the greatest portion of their height.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Eckdahl [451 Apr. 16, 1974 BEVERAGE CRUET [75'] Inventor: Thomas H. Eckdahl, Minneapolis,

Minn.

{73] Assignee: Plastics, Inc., St. Paul, Minn.

[22] Filed: June 21, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 155,025

[52] U.S. Cl. 215/13 R, 220/9 R, 220/69, 220/97 C [51] Int. Cl. A47j 41/00 [58] Field of Search 215/12 R, l3 R, 10, 99.5,

215/1 R, l L; 220/69, 9 R, 17, 23, 6, 23.83, 97 C; 206/65 K; 229/15 H; 222/131, 183

[56] References Cited I UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,493,633 l/1950 Mart 220/97 C 3,355,046 11/1967 Jolly 215/13 R 3,355,045 11/1967 Douglas 215/13 R FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIQNS 36,090 3/1967 Finland 220/9 R Primary Examiner-William T. Dixson, Jr. Assistant Examiner-Stephen Marcus [5 7] ABSTRACT A cruet is formed of a receptacle and an outer supporting sleeve. The receptacle tapers downwardly and inwardly so as to be of smallest diameter at its lower end. The sleeve tapers inwardly and upwardly to engage the receptacle at its upper extremity. The spacing between the receptacle and sleeve is such as to ac comodate the upper end of an identical cruet so that the cruets may be nested together through the greatest portion of their height.

2 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures MTENTED W INVENTOR fCKDAHL TTORNEY BEVERAGE CRUET This invention relates to an improvement in Beverage Cruet and deals particularly with a plastic container capable of containing liquids and condiments, and which may be made inexpensively enough so that it can be disposed of after use.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Various types of double walled receptacles have been produced which include an inner receptacle, an outer enclosure, and an air space therebetween. Such receptacles are used for vacuum bottles, coffee cups or for a wide variety of other purposes. In general, containers of this type have the extreme disadvantage of requiring considerable storage space. Items which are dispensible must normally require a very small-space prior to their use because of the volumn of such items which must be maintained.

As a more specific example, let us consider that the cruet is designed to contain a liquid and that each of five hundred customersin a day or five hundred patients in an institution in aday receive one such receptacle each day. Quite obviously, the storage space which would be required to contain receptacles of the type in'question for use each week would be tremendous. Accordingly, it is necessary that in order to be practical, the receptacles must nest together in such a manner that they may be easily separated one from another and filled for use.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In a structure of the type described, it is always often desirable that the receptacle be provided with an upper lip structure which simplifies the task of pouring liquid from a receptacle without dripping. This is accomplished by providing an out-turned upwardly and outwardly curved upper lip on the receptacle from which liquid may be readily poured.

A further feature of the present invention resides in the provision of a receptacle of the type described in which the body is preferably made of two parts, oneof which comprises an innergenerally frusto-conical receptacle and includes downwardly and inwardly inclined side walls and a connecting bottom wall. The outer member comprises an oppositely tapered inverted generally frusto'conical sleeve which is of larger diameter at its lower end than at its upper end, providing a space between the sleeve and the inner receptacle which is of tapered cross-section. As a result, the lip portion of one receptacle may be inserted into the space between the receptacle and sleeve of a similar receptacle. permitting the receptacles to nest throughout the major portion of their height.

A further feature of the present invention resides in the fact that the outer sleeve is provided near its upper end with a shoulder which is approximately similar in inner diameter to the exterior diameter of the lip at the upper end of a similar receptacle. When two similar receptacles are telescoped together, the lip at the upper extremity of the lower receptacle will engage against the shoulder on the outer sleeve of the upper receptacle preventingv the two receptacles from wedging together while at the same time permitting the receptacles to nest together throughout the major portion of their height.

A further feature of the present invention resides in the provision of an inwardly extending offset at the lower end of the lip portion of the inner receptacle against which the upper end of the enclosing sleeve may engage. As a result, the upper end of the sleeve may wedge against the offset at the lower end of the receptacle lip, forming a rounded reduced diameter neck adjoining the upper end of the structure by means of which the cruet may be readily grasped and handled.

An added feature of the present invention resides in the fact that the cruet may be shipped with theparts separate and with the outer sleeves in telescoping relation and the inner receptacles in telescoping relation. When the cruet is to be used, the inner receptacle is merely wedged into the outer sleeve to form the assembly. When shipped in this manner, a minimum of space is required due to the fact that the sleeves telescope almost completely into one another, as do also the inner receptacle portion.

These and other objects and novel features of the present invention will be more clearly and fully set forth in the following specification and claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the assembled cruet in readiness for use.

FIG. 2 is a vertical sectional view through the same.

FIG. 3 is a top plan view of the same. FIG. 4 is a sectional view indicating a pair of similar cruets packed one upon another.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The cruets are designed for a multiplicity of purposes, but are designed so that liquids of various viscosity may be poured therefrom with a minimum of dripping down the sides of the body. In general the cruets are indicated by the letter A, and include an inner receptacle 10 and an outer supporting sleeve 11. In use the two parts are secured together either by friction or by use of a suitable sealing means.

The inner receptacle '10 includes an upwardly and outwardly inclined frusto-conical wall 12 which is closed at its lower end with a bottom wall 13 having a convex upper surface, and a concave under surface. Near the upper end of the cruet, the tapered wall 12 is outwardly offset as indicated at 14, the extent of the offset being substantially equal to the thickness of the plastic used in forming the cruet. The offset 14 provides an external shoulder 15. Above the offset 14, the receptacle continues as a tapered wall 16 which terminates in an outwardly curved lip 17 which forms the top of the receptacle.

The outer sleeve 11 also comprises a frusto-conical wall portion 19 throughout the major portion of its height. The upper end of the wall 19 curves upwardly and inwardly as indicated at 20 to terminate in an abutment 21 which is designed to engage against the shoulder 15 of the offset 14. Preferably, the proportions are such that the abutment 21 fits snugly about the upper end of the tapered wall 12 and against the abutment so that the two parts of the cruet are frictionally engaged together. Suitable adhesive or solvent means may be provided for securing the two parts together, or the two parts may fit snugly enough to fit together without separation. The outer surface of the inwardly curved portion 20 of the sleeve forms a continuation of the outer surface of the receptacle portion so as to form a curved neck providing a convenient area for handling or manipulating the cruet. The bottom of the receptacle 13 is substantially coplaner with the lower edge 22 of the sleeve 11, so that the inner receptacle is firmly supported.

This arrangement serves a multiplicity of purposes. In the first place, the outer sleeve 11 is in spaced relation to the receptacle l0, and in the event the cruet contains liquid or other material which is extremely hot or extremely cold, the outer sleeve may be used to handle the inner receptacle without direct contact of the fingers with the inner receptacle. The outwardly turned tip portion 17 is so designed that liquid may be poured therefrom with a minimum of dripping. At the same time, the cruets may be stacked one within the other as indicated in FIG. 4 of the drawings. In this event, the upper edge of the lip 17 of the lower cruet engages against the juncture or shoulder 23 between the inwardly and upwardly tapered wall 19 and the inwardly curved sleeve portion 20. The spacing is such that the cruets will not frictionally engage one another when in superimposed relation so that the cruets may be readily separated for use.

In accordance with the Patent Office Statutes, [have described the principles of construction and operation of my improvement in BEVERAGE CRUETS, and while I have endeavored to set forth the best embodiment thereof, I desire to have it understood that changes may be made within the scope of the following claims without departing from the spirit of my invention.

I claim:

I. A cruet including:

an inner receptacle of inverted generally frustoconical wall shape having a closed bottom,

a peripheral outwardly extending offset near its upper extremity, said offset providing an exterior downwardly facing shoulder of a width substantially equal to the thickness of the wall of said inner receptacle,

said inner frusto-conical wall having an upper and outwardly tapering wall portion above said offset terminating in an outwardly curved lip which forms the top of the inner receptacle,

said inner receptacle being formed of plastic which is of substantially uniform thickness throughout,

an outer sleeve comprising a frusto-conical wall portion throughout the major portion of its height,

an inwardly and upwardly curved portion at the upper end of said outer sleeve snugly encircling the portion of said inner receptacle below said offset with the upper edge of said outer sleeve engaging said shoulder,

the thickness of said sleeve being substantially uniform and substantially equal to the thickness of said the inner receptacle,

whereby a neck portion is provided is provided between said lipson said inner container and said inwardly and upwardly curved portion of said outer sleeve,

the outer periphery of the curved lip being substantially equal to the inner diameter of the sleeve at its juncture with said inwardly and upwardly curved portion at the upper end of said frusto-conical wall portion, to permit nesting of one cruet into the other to prevent wedging together of stacked cruets.

2. The structure of claim 1 and in which the closed bottom of saidinner receptacle is extended substan-

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2493633 *Jun 3, 1946Jan 3, 1950Mart Leon TDouble-walled container
US3355045 *Oct 24, 1965Nov 28, 1967Douglas DavidInsulated beverage server
US3355046 *Apr 22, 1966Nov 28, 1967Ross T JollyInsulating tumbler
FI36090A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4055273 *Jun 4, 1976Oct 25, 1977Tumble Not Tumbler, Inc.Spill-resistant container
US4367820 *Jun 22, 1979Jan 11, 1983Yoshino Kogyosho Co., Ltd.Saturated polyester resin bottle and stand
US4519219 *Aug 15, 1983May 28, 1985The Kelch Corp.Receptacle for beverage container
US4548348 *Feb 27, 1984Oct 22, 1985Solo Cup CompanyDisposable cup assembly
US4867313 *Mar 2, 1988Sep 19, 1989I.S.A.P. Spa (Industrie Specializzate Articoli Plastici)Cup for coffee, or similar drinks, formed of synthetic thermoplastics material
US4928848 *Mar 20, 1989May 29, 1990Ballway John ACombination drinking vessel and cup holder with convertible cap/coaster
US5036998 *Oct 26, 1989Aug 6, 1991Dunn Ralph CTable trash container
US5040719 *Mar 8, 1990Aug 20, 1991Ballway John ACombination drinking vessel and cup holder with storable insert
US5398842 *May 27, 1992Mar 21, 1995Whirley Industries, Inc.Thermal container
US5511684 *Aug 26, 1994Apr 30, 1996Kraft General Foods, Inc.Container with movable bottom portion for dispensing contents
US7243812Oct 21, 2005Jul 17, 2007Hurricane Shooters, LlcPlural chamber drinking cup
US7380685Feb 19, 2004Jun 3, 2008Simmons Michael JContainers, sleeves and lids therefor, assemblies thereof, and holding structure therefor
US8272529Aug 3, 2010Sep 25, 2012Hurricane Shooters, LlcPlural chamber drinking cup
US8365941 *May 15, 2009Feb 5, 2013David James MayerDual-capped hydration bottle
US20090071968 *Sep 10, 2008Mar 19, 2009O'brien DianeContainer
US20100288723 *May 15, 2009Nov 18, 2010Clean Designs, LLCHydration bottle
US20110089172 *Oct 16, 2009Apr 21, 2011Keng-Jen ChenDouble-layer container
US20130323381 *Aug 13, 2012Dec 5, 2013Louis DakisMulti-Layer Brewing Cup
WO2004021964A2 *Sep 5, 2003Mar 18, 2004Ben-Levi Michal BroshiContainer
WO2004100736A1 *May 14, 2004Nov 25, 2004Claire ClareDrinking vessel
WO2013159139A1 *Apr 25, 2013Oct 31, 2013Schaerf MarcoStackable vessel having a double‑walled and single‑walled region
Classifications
U.S. Classification215/12.1, D07/523, 220/634, 220/630, 220/918, 206/519
International ClassificationA47G19/23, B65D1/26
Cooperative ClassificationA47G19/23, B65D1/265, Y10S220/918, A47G19/2261
European ClassificationA47G19/22B10, B65D1/26B, A47G19/23