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Publication numberUS3804406 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 16, 1974
Filing dateJun 19, 1972
Priority dateJun 19, 1972
Publication numberUS 3804406 A, US 3804406A, US-A-3804406, US3804406 A, US3804406A
InventorsViscione E
Original AssigneeViscione E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Karate fighter
US 3804406 A
Abstract
The invention comprises a mechanical man having two pairs of separately movable arms and one pair of separately movable legs which are constructed to carry out karate moves. The mechanical man includes electronic circuit apparatus for controlling the operation, and sequencing of the operation, of each of the arms and legs, whereby any given one of the arms or legs may be made to perform a certain characteristic motion when energized by the circuit apparatus, which can be followed in automatic sequence by the energization of another given one of the arms or legs. The circuit apparatus provides for energization of one arm or leg at any given time. The body of the man also includes padded disks mounted about the surface thereof representing sensitive pressure points which serve as targets for the user of the apparatus.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 1.

Viscione 1451 Apr. 16, 1974 KARATE FIGHTER Primary Examiner-Richard G. Pinkham [76] Inventor: Eugene G. Viscione, 21 Franklin St., Assistant Exammer l z' Stouffer semen/me NJ 08876 Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Robert .A. Green [22] Filed: June 19, 1972 57 ABSTRACT [21] Appl..No.: 264,389 The invention comprises a mechanical man having two pairs of separately movable arms and one pair of separately movable legs which are constructed to [52] US. Cl. 272/76, 46/148 carry out karate moves The mechanical man includes electronic circuit apparatus f controlling the p [58] held of Search I 272/57 273/1 tion, and sequencing of the operation, of each of the 273/ 46/27 148 arms and legs, whereby any given one of the arms or legs may be made to perform a certain characteristic [56] References cued motion when energized by the circuit apparatus, UNITED STATES PATENTS which can be followed in automatic sequence by the 1,587,459 6/1926 Workman, Jr... 46/148 energization of another given one of the arms or legs. 3,387,842 6/1968 u Edgar 272/76 The circuit apparatus provides for energization of one 335,796 11/1906 y--- 272/76 arm or leg at any given time. The body of the man also 3*552'749 1/1971 P 273/15 A includes padded disks mounted about the surface thereof representing sensitive pressure points which 3:675:92l 7 1972 Myers, Sr 273/15 A Serve as targets for the of the apparatus" 7 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures 1 i so i g 3O A30 1 l 41 1' I y l 5. 1/

l I I I ,5 23 170 I 9 1eoe- 4805 4 I :190K

1eoc- /l8OC E i i 130 1 ,130 I 1 1 KARATE FIGHTER At the present time and for many years up to now, there has been a great interest in the practice of karate and similar activities. This interest is expanding continually. The practice of karate requires at least two people for best results; however, since it is not always possible for one person to have a partner available, as the next best alternative, a mechanical partner would be most useful. However, no such suitable mechanical partner is known or available.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the Drawings:

FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of the apparatus of the invention showing some of its internal mechanical parts;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view, partly in section, of the apparatus of FIG. 1 and auxiliary operating apparatus therefor;

FIG. 3 is a plan view of a portion of the apparatus of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view of a portion of the apparatus of FIG. I; and

FIG. 5 is a schematic representation of a circuit for use in operating the apparatus of FIG. 1.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS:

Apparatus embodying the invention may be considered to be in the nature of a mechanical man which includes a generally box-like body portion covering the area which would generally comprise the torso of an individual, and a second box-like member seated on the first and representing the head of the mechanical man. The portions 20 and 30 are secured together in any suitable manner. The man 10 includes a first pair ofarms and 4] a second pair ofarms and 51, and a pair of legs 'and 70. In the pairs of arms, arms 40 and 50 are oriented horizontally and are adapted to perform a desired type of motion for a karate practitioner, e.g. a swing, and the arms 41 and 51 are oriented vertically and are adapted to carry out another type of motion, e.g. a chop. The arms and legs are secured to the torso 20 in any suitable manner, with one suitable connection arrangement being described below.

A vertical support post 80, preferably of metal, is secured to the rear surface of the first and second box portions 20 and 30 in any suitable manner. and the lower end thereof is suitably secured to a horizontal stand 90, of wood or metal or the like, which is adapted to rest on the floor. An air compressor is secured to the horizontal stand 90, and a box containing electronic control circuitry is seated on the compressor 100. Other arrangements of the parts may also be used. Also, the air compressor is provided with all necessary relief valves, regulators and the like.

The arms and legs are constructed generally similarly and are connected to their operating mechanisms generally similarly, and those skilled in the art will be able to practice the invention from the schematic showings thereof. Referring to FIG. 2 for a somewhat more detailed showing of an extremity, e.g. leg 60 and its operating mechanism, the leg is formed of a length of alumi-' num tubing carrying a length of sponge rubber tubing covering perhaps one-half of its length and extending from about the center of the member to the free end thereof. The sponge rubber protects the user when he strikes the leg (or arm).

The aluminum tubing of each of the limbs is split near its inner end to receive a stiff spring to impart resiliency to the limb. The spring 140 allows the limb to flex when blocked by the operator without causing damage to the joint of the limb. The spring is illustrated schematically in FIGS. 2 to 4, and its mounting can be readily designed by those skilled in the art. The limbs 40, 50, 60, 70 may also be made of a semi-rigid plastic material, thus eliminating the need for flexible springs 140.

Rubber clubs, knives and similar dummy weapons (not shown) may be attached to the limbs to enable the operator to practice defensive techniques against such weapons.

Referring again to FIG. 2 to illustrate the manner in which the arms and legs are connected to cause them to move, the inner end of the tubing 120 is fixedly connected to a rod which is suitably connected to the piston of an air cylinder 180. The air supply 100 is coupled to cylinder by means of suitable tubing or hose 190.

The air compressor pressure is controlled by a relief valve 200 set for about 50 pounds pressure, and an air pressure regulator 210 may also be incorporated in the system to allow the pressure to be increased or decreased in order to change the speed and force of the operation of the limbs. The air leaving the regulator is delivered to a solenoid-operated air valve 220 which is operated electrically from a circuit to be described and controls the flow of air to cylinder 180.

Briefly, when the valve 220 is operated, air is fed to the cylinder 180, andthe piston 170 is driven out of the cylinder, and this causes the attached leg member 60 to perform its function, e.g. to swing upwardly from its initial vertical position to a horizontal position as illustrated.

The various parts of the apparatus 10 may be assembled in any desired manner, and one suitable specific arrangement is shown in FIGS. 3 and 4. As illustrated, each chop arm 41 and 51 (only arm 41 is shown) is fixedly secured at its lower end to a horizontal shaft 230 which extends into the body 20 and is suitably rotatably secured therein. Each shaft 230 is suitably secured to the piston 170 of an air cylinder 180A which is mounted and suitably supported vertically within the head 30 on a horizontal shaft 240. Cylinders 180A rotate shafts 230 and thus cause arms 41 and 51 to rotate downwardly from their upright position.

Similarly, each swing arm 40 and 50 (only 50 is shown) has the inner end 250 of its tubing rotatably mounted on a pin 260 carried by a bracket 270 secured to the body. The end 250 of arm 50 is secured to the piston 170 of an air cylinder 180B mounted and suitably supported horizontally within the body 20. Operation of air cylinders 1803 causes the arms 40 and 50 to swing toward an individual standing in front of the fighter 10. t

The chop arms and swing arms are suitably offset from each other so that they do not interfere with each other. In one suitable arrangement, the axis of the swing arms is positioned below the horizontal axis about which the chop arms rotate.

Similarly, each leg 60 and 70 has its inner end 150 (FIGS. 2, 3, and 4) rotatably mounted on a shaft 290 which is itself suitably supported horizontally at the lower end of the body 20. The leg end 280 is secured through lever 160 to the piston 170 of an air cylinder 180C suitably supported vertically within body 20.

Of course, all air hoses, solenoids, regulators, etc., are provided as required, although not all are shown in FIGS. 3 and 4.

The body of the karate fighter is also provided with four targets 300 mounted on the front panel of the body. These four targets are located to correspond to sensitive areas of the body including nose, throat, solar plexus, and groin. The four member 300 are identical in construction, as shown in FIG. 5, and each includes an aluminum disk 310 having its outer surface covered with a rubber pad 320 and having its rear surface secured to a shaft 330 which is suitably slidably mounted in bearings in the front and rear walls of the torso portion of the karate fighter. A coil spring 340 is mounted on the shaft 330 between the rear surface of the disk and the front wall of the body to absorb the impact when the operator strikes the member 300.

One circuit 350, usable to operate the karate fighter 10, is shown in FIG. 6 and includes a positive D.C.

' power supply 360 of the order of 20 volts ciiiinetft edtd a bus 370 in which a coin slot 380 and a relaycontrolled starting switch 390 are located. A casette tape recorder is connected across switch 390 to provide sound effects, if desired. The bus 370 is coupled from switch 390 to one winding 400 of relay 410, which controls the switch, to ground. The ground side of the winding 400 is also connected through a second winding 420 to contact 440 of normally open relay 450 having its armature 460 connected back to the bus 370. Relay 450 includes a winding 442. The positive D.C. supply 360 is also connected through a second set of normally open contacts 470 and 480 controlled by relay 410 to a bus 490.

A first lead 500 extends from the bus 490 to a conventional variable timer circuit 510 which is coupled to the winding 520 of a relay 530 operated by the timer. The timer includes a light (not shown) which flashes each time the timer operates and closes the relay 530. The relay 530 includes normally open contacts 540 and 550, and an armature 560 which is connected to the bus 490. Contact 550 of relay 530 is connected to a variable delay module 570 which operates a relay 580 having a winding 581, two contacts 582 and 584, and

arma r 586-.v i A conventional 110 volt A.C. power supply 590 is provided from which buses 600 and 610 extend. The b is o ne t d Q. the a m t 5198 1391.

3 and a motor 620 is connected across the 110 volt supply between bus 610 and the contact 582 of the relay 580. The winding 630 of a relay 640 is also connected across the 1 10 volt supply between the bus 610 and the contact 584 of relay 580. The relay winding 630 operates a first set of contacts including contacts 642 and 644 and an armature 645 which is connected to the bus 490 to the DC. power supply 360. The contact 644 is connected to a delay circuit 647 including a photomodule type CK l 123 and an associated resistor-capacitor network 650 which is connected to the winding 660 of a relay 670 having contacts 672 and 674 and an armature 676. The winding of relay 630 also operates a second set of contacts, including contacts 680 and 682,

which is connected by lead 685 to a bus 686. The armature 684 associated with the contacts 680 and 682 is connected to the bus 600 which is connected to the A.C. power supply 590. Armature 676 of relay 670 is also connected to bus 686.

The circuit 350 also includes a set of six contacts Al to A4, L] and L2, each of which is connected to the relays 220 (FIG. 2) which operate the air solenoids 180 which operate the respective arms and legs. A common contact C is also provided. The circuit 350 also includes an eight-position switch 690 having four decks 691, 692, 693, and 694 of eight contacts each. The control knob for the eight-position switch is suitably mounted on the fighter, e.g. on the head (FIG. 1), for easy operation by the user. The circuit also includes an auxiliary stepper switch 700 having six contacts 701, each of which is connected to one of the contacts A and L which operate the air solenoids 180. Switch 700 includes an operating winding 704 and a wiper 700W for engaging each of the contacts 701.

The first bank 691 of the eight-position switch 690 has each of its first six contacts 691 C connected to one of the six contacts A and L. The seventh contact is unconnected, and the eighth is connected'in common to one side of each of six micro-switches 790, which will be described in greater detail below. The first deck of the eight-position switch has a wiper 691W which is connected by a lead 710 to contact 674 of the relay 670.

The second deck 692 of the eight-position switch, having contacts 692C, has its contacts 1 through 6 and 8 unconnected, and its seventh contact is connected to the wiper 700W of the six-position stepper switch 700. The wiper 692W of the second deck of the eightposition switch is connected to the wiper of the first deck by a lead 720.

The third deck 693 of the 8-position switch, having contacts 693C, has its first six contacts connected together through the winding 442 of relay 450 and a lead 730 to the bus 740 which is connected to the bus 610 of the HO volt supply. The wiper 693W of the third deck is connected to one contact 750 of a relay 752, the armature 753 of which is connected through a lead 756 to the commonly connected first six contacts of the third deck 693. The seventh contact of the third deck 693 is connected through the winding 704 of the sixposition stepper switch 700 and lead 780 to the bus 740, and the eighth contact is unconnected. The wiper 693W of the third deck is also connected to the last contact of a six position switch 770 having six contacts 770C, the rest of which are unconnected.

The fourth deck 694 of the eight-position switch, having contacts 694C, has its first six contacts unconnected, and the seventh contact is connected through the winding 754 of relay 752 to bus 780. The eighth contact is unconnected. The wiper 694W is connected by lead 695 to contact L2.

The six-position switch 770 includes a winding 772 connected through the bus 686 to the armature 676 of the relay 670, and it includes a wiper 770A and six contacts 770C. The first five contacts are unconnected, and the sixth is connected to the wiper 693W of the third deck and to the contact 750 of relay 752 as described.

The circuit 350 also includes the motor 620, which may be a clock motor, which operates at, say, RPM and carries on its shaft a disk 780 positioned to contact and operate the six micro-switches 790 mentioned above and illustrated schematically. The disk 780 includes a cut-out 800 of approximately 60 so that, wherever the motor stops, the cut-out will be positioned at one of the switches 790 which is arranged to be closed thereby. Each of the switches 790 has one contact 790A connected to one of the solenoid contacts A and L as illustrated, and the other contacts 7903 are commonly connected to the eighth contact of 'the first deck of switch 690.

The operation of the circuit 350 is as follows. When the start switch 390 is closed and a coin is inserted in slot 380, the armature 474 of the relay 410 moves to contact 480 and DC. power is applied to the timer module 510. Current flows through the winding 520 of relays 530, and the contacts close, with the armature 560 engaging contact 550. DC. power is now applied to the variable delay circuit which operates relay 580 to move armature 586 into contact with contact 584. It is noted that the delay of circuit 570 is adjusted to permit each of the air cylinders in the body the necessary time to complete its operation. This will be clear to those skilled in the art. This delay circuit 570 also determines the rate at which arm or leg of the karate fighter operates. When the relay 580 operates, the armature 586 closes on contact 584, and this applies A.C. voltage to the winding 630 of relay 640. The two sets of contacts 644 and 682 are now closed by the armatures 645 and 684, and l 10 volt A.C. power is applied to realy 640. At this time, with the contacts of relay 640 closed, DC. power is applied to the delay or timer circuit 647 to operate relay 670. In addition. A.C. power is coupled through the closed contacts of relay 640 and bus 686 to the six-position stepper switch 770, and through the closed contacts of relay 670, and through leads 710 and 720 to the first and second decks of the eight-position switch 690. A.C. power is also coupled to the third deck through leads 610, 740 and 730.

Assuming that the eight-position selector switch 690 was the wipers set to contact the first contact of all of the decks, then A.C. power is applied to the contact Al to the solenoid of arm 40, and the arm performs its motion. After the built-in time period has elapsed, the timer 510 switches off and the relay 520 opens, the delay circuit 570 is de-activated and relays 580 opens, and the other relays open along the line as A.C. power is removedfrom the system, and the system is reset for the beginning of another operation. The timer 510 again closes at the set rate, and the operation is 're peated with arm 40 again performing its operation.

At the same time, when the eight-position switch is set at the beginning of the above-described cycle of operation, the switch 770 is automatically set to its first contact position, and each time the circuit operates and arm 40 performs its motion, the wiper 770W of switch 770 moves by one contact. This operation is repeated, and the arm 40 carries out its motion five times, and, on the sixth time, the relay wiper 770W contacts its sixth contact. This applied A.C. voltage to the wiper 693W of the third deck 693 of the eight-position switch, and 1 l0 volts A.C. is applied to relay 450 which opens its contacts, and this unlatches the latching relay 410 and opens the start switch 390 and turns off the circuit 350.

If the user of the apparatus manually operates switch 690 through each of its first six positions separately, the same operation is repeated for each of the first six contacts of the eight-position switch which control the other arms and two legs of the apparatus. It can be seen that, with each setting of the eight-position switch, the selected member of the body performs its functions six times and then the system shuts down.

if it is desired to operate each of the body arms and legs sequentially, the eight-position switch 690 is set so that the deck wipers touch the seventh contact and the wiper 700W touchesthe first contact of switch 700. When the system is energized by operation of the start switch 390, A.C. power is applied to the wiper 700W of the six-position stepper switch 700 and to its winding 704. With this arrangement, each time the system operates beginning with the timer circuit 510 and the delay circuit 570, first, the first member 40 performs its operation, then the wiper 700W moves to the second contact 701 for the required period of time, during which the second member 41 performs its function. Thus, with each turn-on of the system, the wiper of the six-position stepper switch 700 moves from position to position and energizes each of the body-operating members in turn. When the sixth member L2 and the sixth contact 701 are reached, A.C. power is coupled through lead 695 to the wiper 694W of the fourth deck of the eight-position switch, which is on the seventh contact, and thus to the winding 754 of relay 752, to close its associated armature 753 on contact 750 and to provide current flow through the 'winding 442 of relay 450, and thus to de-energize the circuit as described above.

The circuit 350 can be used to provide random operation of the arms and legs as follows and with switch 690 in the eighth position. When the system is not functioning, the motor 620 rotates, due to the fact that the armature 586 of relay 580 is in contact with the contact 582 and A.C. power is applied to the motor. When the starting latch 390 is operated and the timer and delay circuits operate and the armature 5 86 moves to contact 584, A.C. power is removed from the motor and the motor stops. When the motor stops, the cut-out 800 on the disk 780 is positioned at one of the micro-switches 790 which is closed and thus completes a power circuit to one of the randomly selected solenoid contacts A or L. With the eight-position switch set to the eighth position, each time the timer circuit 510 and delay circuit 570 operate to connect A.C. power to the circuit, power is coupled through the eighth contact of the first deck and through the selected micro-switch 790 to one of the contacts A or L and thus to one of the operating solenoids and air cylinders. The circuit thus permits the selected member to perform its five operations, and the circuit is deactivated, as described above, through relay 450. Each time one of the members completes its functions, the system shuts down. This causes the motor 620 to rotate until the start switch 390 is closed and the timer and delay circuits operate to turn off the motor and to position the cut-out portion of the disk at perhaps a different micro-switch which controls a different operating member.

This mode of random operation can be continued as long as desired.

It will be clear to those skilled in the art that various mechanical and electrical modifications may be made in the apparatus described and within the scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

l. A karate fighter including a body portion representing the torso of a human body,

a head portion seated on said body portion,

a first pair of separately movable arms connected to said body portion and adapted each to perform a characteristic motion when energized,

a second pair of separately movable arms connected to said body portion and adapted each to perform a characteristic motion when energized,

a pair of legs connected to said body and adapted to perform a characterisitic motionwhen energized, and v means in said fighter connected to said arms and legs and energizable by an electronic circuit to selectively energize a given one of said arms and legs, wherein said given one of said arms and legs will perform its characteriatic motion without the remainder of said arms and legs being simultaneously energized.

2. The apparatus defined in claim 1 and including a plurality of disks positioned on said body portion and said head portion and representing selected sensitive locations on the human body.

3. The apparatus defined in claim 1 wherein said first 6. The apparatus defined in claim I wherein each of said arms and legs comprises a length of metallic tubing carrying a length of resilient insulating material and a spring member inserted in said length of metallic tubing to absorb shock.

7. The apparatus defined in claim 1 and including an adjustable switch mounted on said head portion and connected to electronic circuit elements for controlling the operation of said arms and legs.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3888481 *Sep 16, 1974Jun 10, 1975Adams CarlTraining and practicing apparatus for wrestling
US4088315 *Jul 21, 1976May 9, 1978Schemmel Robert ArcherDevice for self-defense training
US4309029 *Jan 8, 1979Jan 5, 1982Tomko Steven MMartial arts striking machine
US4353545 *Mar 3, 1981Oct 12, 1982Anderson Tyrone DAthletic reflex machine
US4401303 *Mar 11, 1982Aug 30, 1983Anderson Tyrone DAthletic reflex machine
US4564192 *Jan 25, 1984Jan 14, 1986Leizer LebowitzMartial arts training apparatus and method
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US4989862 *Sep 20, 1989Feb 5, 1991Michael CurtisBasketball game practice device
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WO1995028994A1 *Apr 12, 1995Nov 2, 1995Moya Gabriel PastorTraining device for martial arts
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Classifications
U.S. Classification482/4, 482/83, 273/454, 463/47.1
International ClassificationA63B69/34, A63B69/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B2244/106, A63B69/34, A63B69/004
European ClassificationA63B69/34, A63B69/00K