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Publication numberUS3804408 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 16, 1974
Filing dateSep 14, 1972
Priority dateJan 31, 1972
Publication numberUS 3804408 A, US 3804408A, US-A-3804408, US3804408 A, US3804408A
InventorsT Kataoka, T Saito, S Yamawaki
Original AssigneeAnritsu Electric Co Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Remaining pin detecting apparatus of a bowling machine
US 3804408 A
Abstract
A remaining pin detecting apparatus of a bowling machine wherein a light projector casts a desired colored light at least on the upper ends of pins placed within the predetermined region on a pin deck; and a light receiver includes as many light receiving elements as a predetermined number of pins, each of the elements generating a signal indicating the presence of the corresponding pin upon receipt of a predetermined colored light reflected from the upper end of the pin so as to automatically count the scores of bowling games. The light projector includes at least one lens to form at least one parallel beam of the colored light. The beam is received and reflected by at least one mirror which is rotated during a pin detecting cycle to deflect the beam across the predetermined region.
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United States Patent [191 Saito et al.

[ Apr. 16, 1974 1 REMAINING PIN DETECTING APPARATUS OF A BOWLING MACHINE [73] Assignee: Anritsu Electric Co., Ltd., Tokyo,

Japan [22] Filed: Sept. 14, 1972 [21] App]. No.: 288,923

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Jan. 31, 1972 Japan 47-11152 [52] US. Cl. 273/54 E, 250/224 [51] Int. Cl A6311 5/04 [58] Field of Search 273/54 C, 54 E; 250/222 R, 250/224, 225, 234, 235, 236

3,623,065 11/1971 Rockwood et al. 273/102.2 R 3,700,236 10/1972 Walker 273/54 C 3,501,644 3/1970 250/222 R 3,309,086 3/1967 Viets et a1 250/222 R Primary ExaminerAnton O. Oechsle Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Edward H. Loveman [5 7] ABSTRACT A remaining pin detecting apparatus of a bowling machine wherein a light projector casts a desired colored light at least on the upper ends of pins placed within the predetermined region on a pin deck; and a light receiver includes as many light receiving elements as a predetermined number of pins, each of the elements generating a signal indicating the presence of the corresponding pin upon receipt of a predetermined colored light reflected from the upper end of the pin so as to automatically count the scores of bowling games. The light projector includes at least one lens to form at least one parallel beam of the colored light. The beamis received and reflected by at least one mirror which is rotated during a pin detecting cycle to deflect the beam across the predetermined region.

13 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures A1 ENTEUAPR 16 1am SHEEI 1 BF 4 F I G Il/l/AIW FIG. 2

PATENTEDAPR 16 I974 muznra FIG. 4

FIG. 5

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PATENTEDAPR 1s i974 3.804.408

sum 3 or 4 FIG. '7

FIG. 8

17'? 50?] 5i? 52 Q 533% 554 L'GHT OUTPUTI DISCRI i HOLDING EEEE 'E L MINATOR CIRCUIT J 17 2 so z 51- 2 5 3 2 LIGHT DISCRI- & HOLDING OUTPUT n E525??? MINATOR CIRCUIT 52%};-

: i z i E i 1?;10 I 50-10 51-10 5 I I A OUTPUT DISCRI- T HOLDING X MINATOR .CIRCUIT 43 RESET INPUT ECIT L 57 5 6 5? T Z A TlMTNG START INPUT 26 CIRCUIT Q START -4 SWITCH 7 PATENTEDAPR 16 1914 mamas SHEET l [1F 4 F l G. 9

FABOUT 3 SECONDS ABOUT T START INPUT 550 015 SECO D ns GATE 627l RELAY MIRROR s4 s5 66 MOTION A ELEMENT I ELEMENT [1 11 69 ELEMENT SZH J1 M 69 OUTPUT I 7 1 OUTPUT 11 OUTPUT \211 1 T 1 RESET INPUT H REMAINING PIN DETECTING APPARATUS OF A BOWLING MACHINE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a remaining pin detecting apparatus of a bowling machine and more particularly to a type capable of detecting pins remaining after not only a first but also a second ball throw.

Heretofore, detection of remaining pins in a bowling game has been effected by mechanical switch means such as microswitches so disposed on the pin setter of a bowling machine as to face the predetermined positions of pins. About 3 seconds after the first ball throw in a frame, the pin setter is brought down to pick up the remaining pins which were not thrown down by a thrown ball. At this time, the presence of the remaining pins is mechanically transmitted to the microswitches which detect the presence. An output detection signal from the switch is supplied to an indication lamp. Detection of remaining pins is carried out by the naked eye from lamp indications. Fallen pins are removed after the remaining pins are picked up by the pin setter. Thereafter the remaining pins are set again at predetermined positions ready for the second ball throw.

For the prior art bowling machine, therefore, lifting of remaining pins by the pin setteris essentially indispensable to permit the second ball throw. Pins remaining after the first ball throw are detected at the moment they are picked up by the pin setter. Pins remaining after the second ball throw are removed without being lifted, and in consequence are detected only by the naked eye instead of the aforesaid microswitches.

Accordingly, it may be contemplated to lift pins still remaining after the second ball throw by a pin setter so as to detect their presence by the microswitches. However, this process of detection will necessarily prolong the time of one game to reduce the operating efficiency of a bowling machine. Further where detection of remaining pins is carried out by a mechanical method using switches, then the vertical movement of a pin setter often damages a switching mechanism and lead wires associated therewith. Accordingly, the remaining pin detecting apparatus of the prior art is not fully reliable for automatic calculation of the scores of bowling games.

Another known remaining pin detecting apparatus is not based on a mechanical, but an optical process. This optical detecting apparatus comprises 10 light projectors mounted over a pin deck to face 10 pins so as to emit light thereon, ten light receivers for catching reflections from the pins illuminated by the light projectors and 10 corresponding switch circuits each of which receives an output from the light receiver caused by reflection from the pin and, in absence of any such reflection, generates an output. The above-mentioned type of optical detecting apparatus needs ten light projectors and 10 light receivers, resulting in a bulky size and high production cost. Further, determination of a relative positional relationship between a light projector and a light receiver which are corresponding to each other requires time consuming work. It sometimes happens that pins are displaced from their originally set positions due to, the slight impingme'nt thereon of a ball or adjacent pins. In such case, accurate detection of remaining pins sometimes fails.

It is accordingly an object of this: invention to provide an apparatus capable of accurate automatic detection of pins remaining after the first and second ball throws in one frame without extending any harmful effect on the mechanical operation required for a bowling game.

Another object of the invention is to provide an optical remaining pin detecting apparatus of simple construction little subject to erroneous operations.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION A light projector used in a remaining pin detecting apparatus according to this invention is so disposed as to emit a specific colored light at least to the upper end of pins set in predetermined positions within a predetermined area on a pin deck. The specific colored light may be obtained by application of, for example, a filter. A light receiver used in this invention includes as many light receiving elements as predetermined number of pins set on the pin deck. The light receiving elements are so disposed as to face at least the upper ends of the pins set on the pin deck, and generate signals indicating the presence of the corresponding pins in response to specific colored reflected lights therefrom. The light receiving elements substantially receive only the specific colored light by means of a filter.

In a remaining pin detecting apparatus according to an embodiment of this invention, the light projector simultaneously illuminates the upper ends of pins set on the pin deck.

In a detecting apparatus according to another embodiment of the invention, the light projector includes means for forming at least one parallel beam of light and means for deflecting the parallel beam substantially within the predetermined area of the deck so as to cause the pins thereon to be illuminated in turn by the parallel beam of light. The means for providing the parallel beam of light includes a source of light, lens and mirror. The means for deflecting the parallel beam rotates the mirror. Those of the light receiving elements which face the pins disposed near the light receiver have a larger area of light reception than those elements which correspond to the pins remote from the light receiver. Output signals from the light receiving elements may, if required, be used in the automatic counting of the scores of bowling games.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a schematic side view of a bowling machine including a remaining pin detecting apparatus according to an embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a top view of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 shows the arrangement of light receiving elements constituting the light receiver of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a schematic side view of a bowling machine including a remaining pin detecting apparatus according to another embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 5 is a top view of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a front view of a light projector shown in FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is a plan view of the light projector;

FIG. 8 is a block digaram of the remaining pin detecting device of this invention when applied in automatically counting the scores of bowling games; and

FIG. 9 illustrates an operational diagram useful in explaining the operation of FIG. 8.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2 showing a remaining pin detecting apparatus according to an embodiment of this invention, the reference numerals 1 to represent ten white-colored pins disposed at predetermined positions on a pin deck 11 in a triangular formation. Above the pin deck 11 ahead of the pins 1 to 10 is suspended a support plate 12, on which there is held a light projector 13 at such a point as to illuminate at least the upper ends of the pins 1 to 10 at the same time. The light projector 13 is fitted at the front with a filter 14 substantially permeable to, for example, infrared rays alone. Accordingly, the upper end of the pins 1 to 10 is illuminated with a desired colored light distinguishable from other beams of light containing small amounts of infrared rays, such as those from a fluorescent lamp which is generally provided to make pins easily observed by a player.

A little above the projector 13 fixed to the support plate 12 is provided a light receiver 15 for receiving infrared rays reflected from the upper ends of the pins 1 to 10. The light receiver 15 comprises a housing 16; a group 17 of 10 light receiving elements 17--] to 17-10 arranged, as shown in FIG. 3, in a triangular pattern on the rear wall of the housing 16 so as to match the similar triangular formation of the 10 pins 1 to 10; a filter 18 substantially permeable to infrared rays alone; and a lens 19 for focusing the image of the upper ends of the pins 1 to 10 on the corresponding light receiving elements.

Referring again to FIG. 1, the reference numeral 21 denotes a known pin setter, which is so located above the pin setting positions as to grasp the pins 1 to 10, and provided with ten switches 22 for lamp indication which are selectively actuated when the pin setter 21 grasps pins still left standing after the first bowl throw. In contrast, the remaining pin detecting apparatus of this invention has its output primarily utilized in automatically counting the scores of bowling games and, if required, also applied in lamp indication. In the latter case, therefore, the aforesaid switches are obviously unnecessary.

The numeral 23 is a skirt having a function of separating a ball 24 from pins 3 and 5 thrown down thereby and also acting as a sort of shock absorber for stopping any further movement of the ball 24. The skirt 23 is painted, for example, black to absorb most of the light emitted thereto, thereby preventing the group 17 of light receiving elements from making any response to otherwise occurring reflections from the skirt 23. The numeral 25 represents a sweeper which is brought down to a position 25 immediately after the arrival of the ball 24 to remove fallen pins from the pin deck 11.

The numeral 27 in FIG. 2 denotes gutters formed on both sides of the pin deck 11. The skirt 23 is provided with a switch 26 which is actuated upon receipt of a shock resulting from the impingement of the ball 24 on the skirt 23 to detect its arrival, thereby causing the sweeper 25 and pin setter 21 to commence operation. Arrival of the ball 24 may also be detected by optical means, namely, by a source of light and a light receiving element separately provided ahead of the pin 1 across the pin deck 11. In this case, light from the source is probably preferred to be invisible rather than visible.

Referring now to FIG. 3, the light receiver 15 includes a group 17 of ten light receiving elements 17-1 to 17-10 corresponding to the 10 pins 1 to 10. On those of the light receiving elements which correspond to, for example, remaining pins 1, 2, 4 and 7 is projected through the lens 19 the bright image of the upper ends of the pins illuminated by the light projector 13. On the other hand, the other fallen pins are not illuminated by the light projector 13 due to their decreased height. Those of the light receiving elements 17-1 to 17-10 which correspond to the pins near the light receiver 15 have a larger area of light reception than those corresponding to pins remote from the light receiver 15. Namely, the light receiving elements are formed in such sizes as to enable the images of the corresponding pins to be picked up without fail thereby even where the pins are slightly displaced from the predetermined positions and also to prevent the image of a single pin from being picked up at the same time by two light receiving elements. The light receiving elements (in FIG. 3, 17-1, 17-2, 174 and l77) which picked up the images of the corresponding pins which happened to be left standing by reflections from the upper ends thereof generate detection signals. The signals generated upon detection of remaining pins will be processed in such a manner as later described in connection with the second embodiment of this invention shown in FIG. 4.

In the foregoing embodiment, light from the projector l3 simultaneously illuminates the predetermined area of the pin deck 11 where the pins are to be set. To obtain high illumination at the upper ends of the remaining pins, that is, large output from the light receiving elements, it is preferred that parallel beams of light be emitted to the ends. Further it is desired to scan the upper ends of remaining pins by emitting a parallel beam of light thereto. In the case of scanning by the parallel beam of light, there may be used a small capacity light source. In this case, scanning is carried out with little effect from ambient lights such as those from fluorescent lamps used in a bowling hall, so that remaining pins can be detected with a high signal-to-noise ratio. Prior to ball throw, light of detection is shut off from the players field of view, and only afterward enters said field. While scanning by a single parallel beam is sufficient for detection of remaining pins, the second embodiment of this invention represents the case where scanning is undertaken by two parallel beams obtained from a single light source. Scanning by said two parallel beams is expected to realize reduction of power consumption.

There will now be described the second embodiment of FIGS. 4 and 5. The parts of these figures same as those of the first embodiment of FIGS. 1 and 2 are denoted by the same numerals and description thereof is omitted. Referring to FIG. 4, a first parallel light beam A from the light projector 13 illuminates the upper ends of pins 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 out of the 10 pins remote from the light projector 13 and light receiver 15 and a second parallel light beam B from the light projector 13 illuminates the upper ends of pins 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 near the light projector 13 and light receiver 15. To this end, the parallel beam A is emitted at a greater height than the parallel beam B. Before used in scanning, both parallel beams A and B are located in positions indicated by solid lines of FIG. 5 and should preferably be shut off from a players field of view. Thereafter these parallel beams A and B are shifted up to the positions of A and B respectively indicated by the broken lines of FIG. 5. While both parallel beams A and B are being thus deflected, remaining pins are illuminated by either or both of the beams, causing the corresponding light receiving elements of the light receiver to generate outputs.

There will now be described by reference to FIGS. 6 and 7 the mechanism of the light projector 13 whereby light is emitted to scan remaining pins. In the upper left hand corner of the front panel 31 of the light projector housing 30 is formed a window 32A for drawing out the parallel beam A. This window 32A is covered with a filter 33A substantially permeable to, for example, infrared rays alone. In the lower right hand corner of the front panel 31 is provided a window 32B for drawing out the parallel beam B. This window 32B, too, is fitted with a filter 33B substantially permeable to infrared rays alone. At the center of the light projector housing 30 is disposed a light source or lamp 34. On both sides of the lamp 34 are set a pair of lenses 35A and 353 which render light beams from the lamp 34 parallel and conduct them to mirrors 36A and 36B placed behind the windows 32A and 32B. The mirrors 36A and 36B reflect both the parallel beams A and B obtained through the lenses 35A and 35B and deliver them to the outside through the filters 33A and 33B and windows 32A and 32B. The mirrors 36A and 36B for reflecting scanning light are rotatably supported at the center by shafts 37A and 37B respectively and fitted at one end with shafts 39A and 39B. The latter shafts 39A and 39B are fitted into slits 40A and 40B cut out in one end of levers 41A and 41B respectively. The levers 41A and 41B are jointly fixed at the opposite end to a connection lever 42, which in turn is connected at one end to drive means 43, for example, a solenoid, and at the opposite end to a spring 44. While the solenoid 43 remains inoperative, the mirrors 36A and 36B take positions indicated by solid lines to reflect parallel beams A and B similarly indicated by solid lines. Where the solenoid 43 is energized, the connection lever 42 is drawn to the left side against the force of the spring 44 to rotate the mirrors 36A and 36B, thereby deflecting the parallel beams A and B to the positions A and B' indicated by broken lines. While the parallel beams A and B are thus deflected, remaining pins are scanned thereby.

There will now be described by reference to FIG. 8 the circuit arrangement of the remaining pin detecting apparatus of this invention. The output terminals of the light receiving elements 17-1 to 17-10 arranged as shown in FIG. 3 are connected to the input terminals of amplifiers 50-1 to 50-10. The light receiving elements may be comprised by photoelectric conversion elements such as solar cells, phototransistors or photodiodes or a combination of photoconductive elements prepared from, for example, cadmium sulfide and a semiconductor circuit for generating signals in response to variations in the conductivity of the cadmium sulfide elements.

Outputs from the amplifiers 50-1 to 50-10 are connected to'the input sides of discriminators 51-1 to 51-10 such as Schmitt circuits. Outputs from the discriminators 51-1 to 51-10 are connected through AND gates 52-1 to 52-10 to the set input terminals of holding circuits 53-1 to 53-10 such as flip-flop circuits. Outputs from the holding circuits 53-1 to 53-10 are fed as calculation inputs to a computor or calculator ing games.

When the start switch 26 associated with the skirt 23 is put into operation, it supplies a start input to the calculator 54 and a timing circuit 55 such as a monostable multivibrator. The holding circuits 53-1 to 53-10 re ceive a reset input from the calculator 54. The AND gates 52-1 to 52-10 receive an enabling signal from the timing circuit 55, which also supplies an energizing signal to a relay 56 having a contact 57. This contact 57 is connected across a power supply source or battery 58 in series with the solenoid 43, and the lamp 34 as a source of light is connected across the power supply source 58.

There will now be described by reference to FIG. 9 the operation of the remaining pint detecting apparatus according to the second embodiment of this invention. When a thrown ball 24 strikes against the skirt 23, the resultant shock closes the start switch 26, momentarily producing the start input 60. Upon receipt of the start input 60, the calculator 54 supplies a reset input 61 to the holding circuits 53-1 to 53-10, thereby resetting outputs I, II and III, for example, of the holding circuits 53-1, 53-2 and 53-7 which were held up to this moment. l

After energization of the start switch 26, the bowling machine is operated in the following manner. In less than about three seconds after the closing of the switch 26, the sweeper 25 is brought down to the position 25' shown in FIG. 4, and the pin setter 21 descends to pickup remaining pins as is well known. The sweeper 25 removes remaining pins by moving toward the skirt 23 and is brought back to the aforesaid position 25'. Thereafter the pin setter 21 comes down to set remaining pins at the predetermined positions on the deck. The pin setter 21 and sweeper .25 are jointly lifted ready for the second bowl throw.

Upon the closing of the start switch 26, the timing circuit 55 receives the start input 60. The timing circuit 55 may include three timers each formed of a monostable multivibrator. The first timer generates a pulse for about 3 seconds (practically less than 3 seconds) in response to the start input 60. The second and third timers are actuated by the rear edge of the pulse. The second timer produces a pulse 62 of about 0. 1 5 second duration to enable the gates 52-1 to 52-10. The third timer produces a pulse 63 of about 0.1 second duration to energize the relay 56. When energized, the relay 56 has its contact 57 closed to operate the solenoid 43 .be-

fore the pin setter 21 is brought down after the descent of the sweeper 25. Operation of the solenoid 43 causes the mirrors 36A and 36B to rotate for an interval 64, thereby deflecting parallel beams A and B through angles 6,, and 0,, respectively. During a time interval 65, the beams A and B rest at the positions A and B. During the succeeding interval 66 the mirrors 36A and 36B are brought back to the original positions. While being deflected during the aforesaid interval 64, the beam A illuminates, for example, remaining pins 1 and 2, causing outputs 67 and 68 to be delivered from the corresponding light receiving elements 17-1 and 17-2. While being deflected during the interval 64, the beam B is emitted to, for example, remaining pin 7, causing output 69 to be drawn out from the corresponding light receiving element 17-7. During the succeeding interval 66, the light receiving elements 17-1, 17-2 and 17-7 generate outputs 67, 68' and 69' due to the return of the mirrors 36A and 36B.

Outputs 67, 68 and 69 from the light receiving elements 17-1, 17-2 and 17-7 are amplified by the amplifiers 50-1, 50-2 and .50-7 to an extent required for distinction by the discriminators 51-1, 51-2 and 51-7. When supplied with voltage having a higher level than the threshold level, the discriminators generate outputs which set the holding circuits 53-1, 53-2 and 53-7 through the enabled AND gates 52-1, 52-2 and 52-7 to produce outputs 70, 71 and 72 corresponding to the remaining pins 1, 2 and 7. In this case, outputs 67', 68' and 69 from the light receiving elements 17-1, 17-2 and 17-7 do not exert any effect on the corresponding holding circuits 53-1, 53-2 and 53-7 which have already been set. Outputs from the holding circuits 53-1, 53-2 and 53-7 are supplied to the calculator 54 to count a number of fallen pins. The outputs are held until there are supplied next start input 73 and reset input 74 as the result of the second ball throw. Or the outputs may be reset immediately after the calculator 54 completes counting. After the second ball throw, the sweeper 25 is operated in the same manner as after the first ball throw. However, the pin setter 21 is not put into operation. Remaining pins are optically detected after the sweeper 25 is shifted to the position 25', as after the first As previously described, the beam A illuminates chiefly pins 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 due to its greater height, while the beam B is emitted chiefly to pins 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 due to its lower height. Therefore, the pins 7, 8, 9 and 10 are still illuminated by the beam A, though they are shut off from the beam B by the pins placed ahead of them, thus presenting no difficulties in their detection. Further, the pins 4, 5, and 6 are illuminated by the beam A, fully permitting their detection even though they are not illuminated with the beam B, which is shut-off from the pins 4, 5 and 6 by the pins placed ahead of them.

According to the circuit of FIG. 8, the lamp 34 is always kept on by being connected to the power source 58. However, it may be connected in parallel with the solenoid 43 to be lighted only when the relay 56 is actuated. Further, if a single parallel light beam is designed to illuminate all the pins on the pin deck, their detection can be fully effected.

The AND gates 52-1 to 52-10 permit the passage of detection signals only during the operation of the solenoid 43, that is, while the beams A and B scan the pins, thus preventing the occurrence of unnecessary optical or electric noises.

The electric operation of a remaining pin detecting apparatus according to the first embodiment of this invention will be easily inferred from that of the second embodiment.

What we claim is:

1. ln apparatus for detecting remaining pins on a pin deck after first and second ball throws in one frame of bowling games, said apparatus comprising:

a light projector means positioned relative to a predetermined area on said pin deck on which a predetermined number of pins are to be set for illuminating at least the upper ends of the pins with a predetermined colored light;

said light projecting means including,

a source of colored light,

a lens means disposed to receive light from said light source for forming at least one parallel beam of light,

a mirror means for receiving and reflecting said parallel beam of light passing from said lens means, and

a drive means mechanically coupled with said mirror means and adapted to rotate said mirror means to deflect said parallel beam of light reflected from said mirror within said predetermined area of said pin deck where the pins are to be set, and

a light receiver means for receiving substantially colored reflections from the upper ends of said pins set on said pin deck and illuminated by said light projector means, said light receiver means including light receiving elements corresponding to the pins provided in said predetermined number and being positioned so that each of said light receiving elements receives only reflection from a corresponding pin and produces an output indicative of the presence of said corresponding pin whereby remaining pins on said pin deck after first and second ball throws are detected.

2. The apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said light projector means further includes a filter substantially permeable only to the predetermined colored rays of the light emitted from said source; and said light receiver means includes a lens and a filter substantially permeable to said predetermined colored rays.

3. The apparatus according to claim 1 wherein those of said light receiving elements of said light receiver means which correspond to the pins disposed near said light receiver means have a larger area of light reception than the light receiving elements corresponding to the pins placed remote from said light receiver means.

4. The apparatus according to claim 1 further comprising a filter substantially permeable to said colored light which is positioned in the passage of said parallel light beam reflected from said mirror.

5. The apparatus according to claim. 1 wherein said lens means includes a first and second lens located to I receive light from said source for forming first and second parallel beams of light and said mirror means includes a first and second mirror for receiving and reflecting said first and second parallel light beams passing through said first and second lenses, and said drive means are mechanically coupled with said first and second mirrors and adapted to rotate said first and second mirrors to deflect parallel beams of light reflected from said first and second mirrors substantially within said predetermined area of said pin deck where the pins are to be set.

6. The apparatus according to claim 5 wherein said first and second parallel beams of light are delivered at difierent heights from said light projector means.

7. The apparatus according to claim 6 further including first and second filters substantially permeable to a predetermined colored light which are disposed in the passages of the first and second parallel light beams reflected from said first and second mirrors.

8. The apparatus according to claim 6 wherein the first parallel light beam reflected from said first mirror is adapted to chiefly illuminate the upper ends of pins disposed in the first section of the predetermined area of said pin deck, and said second parallel light beam from said second mirror is adapted to chiefly illuminate the upper ends of pins placed in the second section of said predetermined area of said pin deck.

9. The apparatus according to claim 8 wherein the first and second sections of said predetermined area overlap each other.

10. A remaining pin detecting apparatus of a bowling machine comprising:

projecting means for emitting at least one parallel beam of light to the upper ends of pins set on a predetermined area of a pin deck; said projecting means comprising a source of colored light a lens means disposed to receive light from said light source for forming said parallel beam of light and a mirror means for receiving said parallel beam of light passing from said lens means;

a light receiver including light receiving elements corresponding to the pins so as to receive reflections from said pins when they are illuminated by said parallel beam of light;

a detector means for detecting the arrival of a ball at said predetermined area of the pin deck during a bowling game;

a generator means connected to said detection means for producing a signal in a predetermined length of time after-detection of the arrival of said ball; and

means mechanically coupled with said mirror means for deflecting said parallel beam of light substantially within said predetermined area of said pin deck in response to said signal from said generator means.

11. The apparatus according to claim 10 further including a plurality of output means coupled to said'light receiving elements for generating outputs in response to outputs produced by said'elements upon receipt of reflected light from the upper end of the'pins, said output means holding their outputs for a predetermined length of time; and a calculator connected to receive outputs from said output means for counting the scores of a bowling game, said calculator being designed to generate a signal for resetting outputs of said output means in response to the detection of the arrival of said ball by said detector means.

12. The apparatus according to claim 11 further including gate means connected between said light receiving elements and output means, and timing means for producing an output in response to a signal from said detector means for a predetermined length of time after the detection of a ball arrival of said ball by said detector means, said gate means being enabled in response to said output from said timing means.

13. A remaining pin detecting apparatus of a bowling machine comprising:

a light projector positioned to illuminate at least the upper end pins of a predetermined number set on the predetermined area of a pindeck; said light projector comprising,

a source of colored light,

a lens means disposed to receive light from said light source for forming at least one parallel beam of light,

a mirror means for receiving and reflecting said parallel beam of light passing from said lens means, and

a drive means mechanically coupled with said mirror means and adapted to rotate said mirror means to deflect said parallel beam of light reflecting from said mirror within said predetermined area of said pin deck;

a light receiver including as many light receiving elements as the number of pins which are so posi tioned as to receive light from said light projector when reflected from the corresponding pins on said pin deck;

a plurality of output means coupled to the output side of said light receiving elements for generating outputs for a predetermined length of time in response to outputs from said elements;

a plurality of gating means connected between said light receiving elements and said output means;

a detector means for detecting the arrival of a ball at said predetermined area of said pin deck; and timing means connected to said detector means for enabling said gating means in a predetermined length of time after the detection of the arrival of said ball by said detector means.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4629189 *Jan 28, 1985Dec 16, 1986Vittorio MeniconiPhotoelectric pinfall detection system
US4726587 *Jul 11, 1986Feb 23, 1988Fitch Robert COptical bowling pin sensor
US5679079 *Oct 23, 1995Oct 21, 1997Crosby; Kennith D.Solid state bowling pin counter and method therefor
US5803819 *Nov 13, 1995Sep 8, 1998Tuten; William J.Solid state pinspotter controlled chassis and method therefor
EP0151956A2 *Jan 18, 1985Aug 21, 1985Vittorio MeniconiApparatus mounted on bowling-lanes for indicating the game results
WO1997049467A1 *May 29, 1997Dec 31, 1997Bms Bowling Marketing ServiceBowling alley with monitoring device and process for optimising the cycles of movement to be performed after the launch of a ball
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/101, 250/224
International ClassificationA63D5/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63D5/04
European ClassificationA63D5/04
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
May 2, 1986AS01Change of name
Owner name: ANRISTSU CORPORATION
Effective date: 19851001
Owner name: ANRITSU ELECTRIC CO., LTD.
May 2, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: ANRISTSU CORPORATION
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:ANRITSU ELECTRIC CO., LTD.;REEL/FRAME:004541/0296
Effective date: 19851001