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Publication numberUS3804416 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 16, 1974
Filing dateMar 27, 1972
Priority dateMar 27, 1972
Publication numberUS 3804416 A, US 3804416A, US-A-3804416, US3804416 A, US3804416A
InventorsL Jones, A Sims
Original AssigneeCalifornia R & D Center
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Two level game board apparatus
US 3804416 A
Abstract
A two level game board apparatus, adapted to be played with playing pieces, comprises a first game board having a column mounted thereon for rotatively supporting a second game board. Each board includes a group of indicated areas adapted to receive the playing pieces. Each group of indicated areas extending about the periphery of the respective boards constitute portions of a path or course. A number of indicated areas on each path portion are designated so as to constitute a distinguishable group to enable the playing pieces landing on designated areas of the path portions of one board to move to designated areas of the path portions of the other board. During play, the second game board is rotatable with respect to the first game board in order to constantly change the angular relationship of the second game board with respect to the first game board. In this manner, the routes taken between board levels are constantly changing.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 [1 1 Jones et a1.

[ Apr. 16, 1974 TWO LEVEL GAME BOARD APPARATUS [73] Assignee: California R & D Center, Palisades,

Calif.

22 Filed: Mar. 27, 1972 21 Appl. No.: 238,372

OTHER PUBLICATIONS Playthings Magazine, Sept. 1964; page 152 cited.

Primary Examiner-Delbert B. Lowe Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Jackson & Jones 5 7] ABSTRACT A two level game board apparatus, adapted to be played with playing pieces, comprises a first game board having a column mounted thereon for rotatively supporting a second game board. Each board includes a group of indicated areas adapted to receive the playing pieces. Each group of indicated areas extending about the periphery of the respective boards constitute portions of a path or course. A number of indicated areas on each path portion are designated so as to constitute a distinguishable group to enable the playing pieces landing on designated areas of the path portions of one board to move to designated areas of the path portions of the other board. During play, the second game board is rotatable with respect to the first game board in order to constantly change the angular relationship of the second game board with respect to the first game board. In this manner, the routes taken between board levels are constantly changing.

9 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures w ill Q ATENTEBAPRISiHM 3.804.416

SHEE'! 1 BF 3 nmmmum IIIIIIIIHHHHH Ill lllmmllllll SHEET 3 [IF 3 PATENTEDAPR 16 m4 TWO LEVEL GAME BOARD APPARATUS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The present invention relates generally to amusement devices and more particularly to game boards which are adapted to be utilized with playing pieces.

2. Description of the Prior Art There are many types of game boards that have been patented and/or developed to provide amusement fo people of all ages.

.One of the earlier game boards is described in US.

Pat. No. 1,903,661. The apparatus disclosed therein comprises a board having a track marked at the edge of the board. Markers, or playing pieces, are adapted to travel over the track with their movement controlled by a pack of cards having directions imprinted thereon. The game is still quite popular and is sold under the trademark SORRY.

A game that has also been quite popular is the game that is sold under the trademark MONOPOLY. This game is described in US. Pat. No. 2,026,032, and is similar to the SORRY game with the exception that the extent of the moves of the playing pieces is controlled by the rolling of dice.

US. Pat. No. 3,1 16,928 discloses a game board having a plurality of inlaid sockets forming a course or continuous path. The sockets are adapted to receive marbles forming the playing pieces. The object of the game is to be the first one to move four marbles from a start or base position, around the course to a finish or home position. The advancement of the marbles is controlled by the rolling of dice.

In playing the game, if one marble lands on a socket occupied by an opponents marble, the opposing marble vacates the socket and is sent back to the base position. Because of the number of marbles'involved, the frequencyof having to return to the base position is quite high, thereby making the game interesting.

Later versions of this game provide for various ways to take shortcuts along the course in order to reach the home position faster. These shortcuts are created by designating certain sockets as ones forming a shortened path. If a marble lands on any of these designated sockets, it can continue on the shortened path. The later version of this game also provides for another shortcut by designating a special socket in the middle of the board. The socket canbe reached only by certain avenues. Upon reaching this socket, the marble cannot leave there until a certain number is rolled on the dice, after which the marble is free to continue a shortened path to the home position.

Although this game affords one a variety of optional moves, the game is played on only one plane. Because of this, the moves are relatively simple, and the decision making as to what move to make is not very challenging.

SUMMARY OF THE NVENTION The present invention adds a new dimension to the games described above by utilizing two game boards having separate tracks whichmay be interplayed in a completely novel manner.

The game board apparatus comprises a first game board and a second game board relatively rotatable. Each game board has indicatedareasextending about the respective board and constituting portions of a path or course. Various indicated'areas on the upper and lower tracks are specially desiganted to enable the playing pieces to travel from the path portion on one game board to the path portion on the other game board.

During play, the second game board is rotatable with respect to the first game board in order to constantly change the routes taken between boards.

The main advantage of the present invention is that new dimensions are added to an old game which is played on a single board. By having a dual level path which is constantly changing, the player is faced with more complex decisions in deciding what moves to make of the many options available to him. Moreover, he must be more visually astute than for previous games of this type. All of these novel features tend to be more challenging and serve to heighten the interest one would have in the game. The features of the present invention which are believed to be novel are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. The

present invention, both as to its organization and manner of operation, together with further objects and advantages thereof, may best be understood by reference to the following description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawings, FIG. 1 illustrates a game board apparatus, generally indicated by arrow 10, comprising a first game board 20 and a second game board 30, rotatively mounted above. The game boards are substantially similar in structure except for differences which will be described hereinafter.

Each game board comprises a central portion 21 and 31, each having three legs extending radially outward therefrom at intervals. For illustrative purposes, the three legs of the game board 20 are numbered 22, 23, and 24 while the three legs of the game board 30 are numbered 32, 33 and 34.

The game boards further include a plurality of sockets 25 and 35 spaced about the peripheries thereof for receiving a plurality of playing pieces 40. The playing pieces are in the form of pegs for fitting into the sockets 25 and 35. However, they may also be in the form of marblesor other conventional designs.

The sockets 25 and 35 extend about the peripheries of the boards 20 and 30 and constitute portions of a path or course.

Each member playing the game has four playing pieces 40 which are distinguishable by color from the other groups of playing pieces. The object of the game for each member is to get his four playing pieces from a starting or base row, around the course, to a home row. Each leg has a base row and a home row to accommodate one player. For example, leg 22 has four sockets forming a base row 26 for receiving the player's four playing pieces 40. A home row 27 is also formed by four sockets for receiving the four playing pieces 40 after each has completed the course.

The sockets at the inner ends of each leg are specially designated by either color, such as black, or, as in this case, by a raised ring placed therearound. For illustrative purposes, these sockets will be described as black sockets 28 and 38. The function of these sockets will be described hereinafter.

As shown in FIG. 2, the basic structure of each game board and 30 is similar in construction for mass production purposes. Each game board includes a slotted aperture 29 and 39. Each aperture 29 and 39 includes a plurality of slots 51 and 52 formed about the periphery of the aperture. The utility of each of the slots will be described hereinafter.

A column 60 is provided to be fixedly mounted on the central portion 21 of th game board 20 for rotatingly supporting the game board 30. The column 60 includes a plurality of lugs 61 for extending into the slots 51 formed in the aperture 29.

The upper extremity of the column 60 is adapted to extend through the aperture 39 of the game board 30, with an annular surface 63 being provided to support the game board 30 at the rim of the aperture 39. A plurality of bosses 64 are formed on the stepped cam or annular surface 63 to extend into the slots 52 formed about the aperture 39. The sides of the bosses 64 are angularly biased to enable each slot edge to easily slide up over a boss 64 to be rotated to engage the adjacent boss 64. The bosses 64 are positioned in such a manner that the board 30 is adapted to be moved to three angular positions, each position being offset 60 between the corresponding leg portions.

After the game board 30 is mounted over the column 60, a cup-shaped cap 70 is adapted to be fixedly connected to the upper extremity of the column 60. The cap 70 is provided with a pointer 71 which is adapted to extend over three indicial areas, numbered 1 4, 2 5, and 3 6, located about the inner periphery of the game board 30.

OPERATION As stated previously, the object of the game is to be the first to move all four of ones playing pieces 40 about any of a number of available courses from the base row 26 to the home row 27. The available courses will be described hereinafter.

The game is played with a pair of conventional dice A and B.

To get any playing piece out of ones base row 26 (putting it into play) a one or a six must be rolled with die B. Until a player gets his first playing piece into play, he only uses the die B. Thereafter he used both dice A and B.

The die A is rolled to determine the angular position of the game board 30 with respect to the game board 20. The board 30 is rotated and positioned so that the indicator 71 points to the indices corresponding to the number rolled. For example, if the number one or four were rolled, the game board 30 would be rotated to a position shown in FIGS. 1 and 3. In that position, the pointer 71 is located over the indices 1 4 of the game board 30. If the number three or six were rolled, the

game board 30 would be rotated until the pointer 71 is positioned over the indices 3 6. In each instance, the game board 30 is rotated until the pointer 71 is pointing to the desired index and the bosses 64 are positioned within the slots formed in the aperture 39. This engagement ensures that the game board 30 is always offset 60 out of phase with the bottom board 20.

When a playing piece 40 lands on a black socket 28 or 38 and has more moves to make, it is placed on the black socket 28 or 38 above or below it and continues. The placement from one level to another does not count as one of the number rolled.

A player can land on or move over an opponents playing piece. When a player lands exactly on an opponents piece on the last number he rolled, the opponents piece is removed and placed back to its base position. A player may not land on or move over his own playing piece.

There are two optional shortcuts in the game which a playing piece can make to shorten the route from the base row to the home row. These shortcuts will be discussed in the example given below.

Assuming ones playing pieces 40 have the base row 26 and home row 27 on leg 22. In the starting position, all four playing pieces 40 would be located in the base row 26. In the first turn, only die B would be rolled. If a one or a six were rolled, a playing piece 40 would be taken from the base row 26 and positioned on a socket 25 specially designated starting socket on FIG. 3.

At the next turn, after the other players have all had a turn, die A would first be rolled to determine the angular position of the board 30 with respect to the board 20. Let us assume that a four was rolled, (hereinafter designated A-4) which would dictate that the board 30 be rotated to a position shown in FIG. 3, after which the number rolled on the die B would dictate the number of sockets 25 traversed. Ifa four were rolled (B-4) the playing piece 40 on socket 80 would be moved four jumps to the fourth socket designated 81 on FIG. 3.

In the next turn, let us assume that an A-1 and a B4 were rolled. If the board 30 is not already at the position shown in FIG. 3, it would be moved there, after which the playing piece 40 on socket 81 would be initially moved ahead one jump to the black socket 28 designated socket 82 in FIG. 3. Since the playing piece 40 has more jumps or moves to make, it must change levels to continue. In this case, the playing piece 40 would be placed on the black socket above socket 82. This socket is designated 83. The placement from one level to another does not count as one of the number rolled. Therefore, the playing piece 40 continues in a clockwise direction from socket 83, three more jumps to socket 84. In continuing around the board 30, the playing piece 40 moves around the leg 32 (dictated by die B) until it approaches the black socket 85. At this point, if the piece reaches socket 85 and has more moves to make, it is dropped to the black socket 28 below socket 85, to continue on the board 20. If the board 30 were in the position shown in FIG. 3, the piece 40 would be dropped to a black socket on leg 23.

If a three or a six were rolled with the die A, the board 30 would first be rotated to the angular position shown in FIG. 4, and the piece 40 would be dropped from socket 85 in its new position to the black socket 87. The playing piece 40 would then continue around the latter half of leg 22 until it reaches or passes the directional socket 88. As the pieces 40 go past the socket 88, they are directed into the home row 27.

It should be noted any one of the four playing pieces 40 for each team can be moved with each turn, as long as they are on the playing courses of the boards and 30.

As stated above, a playing piece can land on or move over an opponents piece. When a player lands exactly on an opponents playing piece, on the last number rolled, the opponents piece is removed from that socket and placed back in its respective base row 26, to start over again.

There are two optional shortcuts in the present apparatus.

In the first shortcut, if a player rolls a number on die B that leaves one of his pieces 40 one move beyond a black circle 28, he may jump to a center position 90 located on the indicator cap 70. In order to leave the center position 90, a player must subsequently roll a one with the die B. At this time, he may proceed to any of the black sockets 28 or 38 on either level. If a player desires to take this shortcut with a playing piece already in a black socket 28 or 38, the only way he can jump into the center position 90 is to roll a one on the die B. For example, if the player from leg 22 started with a piece on socket 80 and rolled a B6, he could option to move five jumps to socket 82 and on the sixth jump move to center position 90. If he does not take this option, he can move up to socket 83 to continue on leg 32. If he does go to the center position 90, he must subsequently roll a B-l to move the playing piece to any black socket 28 or 38. In this instance, it would be advantageous to move to socket 87 since this would be the shortest route to the home row 27.

[n the second shortcut, if a player lands exactly on a black socket 28 or 38 with the last number he rolled, he' may, on his next turn, move diagonally between black sockets 28 and 38 on alternate levels. For example, a pair of moves are shown in FIG. 4. Assuming a playing piece from leg 33 landed on black socket 83 with the last number rolled. On his next roll, he rolls an A-6 and a [3-3. The upper board 30 is already in the sixth position shown in FIG. 4. The playing piece 40 would then move from the black socket 83, diagonally socket 91. Sincethe players home row 27 is on leg 33 and he has one move left, he would continue from there to socket 92 in order to proceed to the home row 27.

The main advantage of the present apparatus is that the various routes one could take and the ever changing conditions of the top board add a complexity and challenge that are not possible in single planed game boards.

Although the game can be played with two to six players, it is especially attractive for six players. With 24 playing pieces in play, there are many opportunities to land on opponents playing pieces to send them back to their base row. Moreover, the shortcuts enable one to make various offensive and defensive maneuvers. However, since one can be sent back to base row at any time, these shortcuts can'also be frustrated, all of which adds to the enjoyment of the game.

It should be noted that various modifications can be made to the apparatus while still remaining within the purview of the following claims.

What is claimed is:

downward to socket 87, and then diagonally upward to 45V 1. A two level game board apparatus to be played with playing pieces comprising:

a first board having a central portion and three leg portions extending radially outward from said central portion, each leg portion having indicated areas adapted to receive the playing pieces, said indicated areas extending about the first board and constituting portions of a playing path;

a second board mounted over said first board and having the same central portion and three leg portions as said first board, said second boards leg portions having indicated areas adapted to receive the playing pieces, said indicated areas extending about said second game board and constituting portions of said playing path, certain of said indicated areas on each path portion constituting a separate distinguishable group to enable the playing pieces landing on those separate areas of the path portions of one board to move to separate areas of said group of the path portions of said other board;

a central support member fastened to said first board and rotatably connecting said first and second board;

means on said central support member for a rotatably relative positioning of said first and secondboards respective leg portions so that they do not overlap and are circumferentially offset with the playing path portions of each board being operatively positioned to permit playing pieces to move between said boards; I

a pointer member fixedly connected to said central support member; and

indicating meanson said second board for cooperating with said pointer member in positioning said relatively movable second board.

2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said indicating means comprises a plurality of indices formed on said second board adjacent the periphery of said central support memberwhereby the pointer member is capable of pointing to any one of the indices to indicate the angular position of the second board with respect to the position of said first board.

3. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein each of said first and second boards three leg portions are oriented from each other.

4. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said indicated areas on each of said first and second boards are located about the outer periphery of each board.

5. The apparatus of claim 4 wherein each of said indicated areas of each of said first and second boards comprises a socket for receiving the playingpieces.

6. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said certain indicated areas on each path are located adjacent the junctions of the legs.

7. The apparatus of claim 6 wherein each of said indicated areas of each of said first and second boards comprises a socket for receiving the playing pieces.

8. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said means for rotatably positioning said first and second board leg portions so that they do not overlap includes a stepped cam surface adjacent one end of the outer periphery of said central support member and slots in an aperture formed in said second board for cooperating with said stepped cam surface in positioning; said second board.

the central support member and first board together.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2313473 *Aug 23, 1941Mar 9, 1943Heacock Woodrow ArthurGame device
US3399895 *Jan 10, 1966Sep 3, 1968Alice L. BeachThree-dimensional checker game apparatus
US3604705 *Mar 10, 1969Sep 14, 1971Hawthorne Nathaniel FGame counter holder
US3661391 *Mar 2, 1970May 9, 1972John M HenshawVariable pattern three-dimensional game board
GB667737A * Title not available
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *Playthings Magazine, Sept. 1964; page 152 cited.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5083792 *Sep 18, 1990Jan 28, 1992Radunz William FBoard game apparatus
US5386994 *Feb 9, 1994Feb 7, 1995Baranowski; Garry L.Board game
US5556099 *Mar 6, 1995Sep 17, 1996Mardirosian; RoubikThree dimensional chess game
US5692753 *Oct 17, 1996Dec 2, 1997Falk; Janet M.Marble and dice board game and method of use
US5810359 *Apr 22, 1997Sep 22, 1998Mclellan & Mcmahon, Inc.Board game
US6164650 *Aug 31, 1995Dec 26, 2000Mclellan & Mcmahon, Inc.Board game
US6273422 *Nov 8, 1999Aug 14, 2001Mcgahan Terrence J.Three dimensional alignment game playing system and method
US6361048 *Dec 29, 2000Mar 26, 2002James LynnGame board apparatus and method of playing same
US6796561Nov 1, 2002Sep 28, 2004Mattel, Inc.Game with commonly moved enemy
US6871853Nov 1, 2002Mar 29, 2005Mattel, Inc.Game with accumulable tokens
US7025352Nov 1, 2002Apr 11, 2006Mattel, Inc.Game with multiple chambers
US7040624Nov 1, 2002May 9, 2006Mattel, Inc.Game with multi-level game board
WO2003101556A1 *May 30, 2003Dec 11, 2003W W Technology Pty LtdA game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/241, 273/248, 273/280, 273/282.1, 273/284
International ClassificationA63F3/02, A63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F2003/0022, A63F2003/00274, A63F3/00214, A63F2003/00217, A63F3/00006
European ClassificationA63F3/00A2, A63F3/00B3