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Publication numberUS3805295 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 23, 1974
Filing dateAug 4, 1972
Priority dateDec 15, 1971
Also published asUS3742518
Publication numberUS 3805295 A, US 3805295A, US-A-3805295, US3805295 A, US3805295A
InventorsGarcia J
Original AssigneeMarshall Yoakum
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sport suit collar
US 3805295 A
Abstract
A wind resistant suit construction comprises, in combination:
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Garcia 51 Apr. 23, 1974 SPORT SUIT COLLAR [75] Inventor: Joe N. Garcia, Wildomar, Calif.

[73] Assignee: Marshall Yoakum, Los Angeles,

Calif.

[22] Filed: Aug. 4, 1972 [21] Appl. N0.: 277,872

I Related U.S. Application Data [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 208,214, Dec. 15,

1971, Pat. No. 3,742,518.

[52] U.S. Cl 2/79, 2/127, 2/DIG. 6 [51] Int. Cl A4ld 13/00 [58] Field of Search 2/79, 80, 81, 2.1 A, 2.1 R,

2/127, DIG. 6

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,505,239 4/1950 Goldstein .2/80

1,973,421 9/1934 Wallace 2,580,969 1/1952 Stephenson.....

3,135,256 6/1964 Gruber 2,663,873 12/1953 Stern 3,691,564 9/1972 La Mari-e 2/81 X FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 786,357 11/1957 Great Britain 2/81 865,555 3/1941 France 534,100 2/1941 Great Britain 2/79 Primary Examiner-H. Hampton Hunter Attorney, Agent, or Firm-William W. Haefliger [57] ABSTRACT A wind resistant suit construction comprises, in combination:

a. an upright suit body with arm sleeves attached thereto, the body having a neck portion,

b. dual zipper connections at the front of said body and extending generally downwardly from the neck portion, the body having a front panel defined between said zipper connections,

c. the neck portion defining overlapping flaps adjacent the top extent of said panel, and d. there being interconnection layers on the flaps adapted to releasably interconnect in response to pressure exertion pressing said layers together.

2 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures PATENTEU APR 2 3 1974 SHEET 1 OF 3 MTENTEDAPR 23 IQM SHEET '2 OF 3 PATENTEI] APR? 3 I974 SHEET 3 OF 3 SPORT SUIT COLLAR This application is a continuation-in-part of my prior application entitled Jump Suit," Ser. No. 208,214, filed Dec. 15, 1971 and now US. Pat. No. 3,742,518, dated July 3, 1973.

BACKGROUND OFv THE INVENTION This invention relates generally to the construction of wind resistant clothing, and more particularly concerns the construction of suits as may be worn by parachutists, sky divers, motorcyclists, etc.'

Sports such as sky diving and motorcycling involving extreme wind exposure have recently gained widespread popularity. Along with such activities have grown demands andneeds for wind resistant clothing of sturdy construction, and capable of rapid, easy, assured donning and removal. Especially needed is a method and means of rapid closure of a split neck or collar-where the. suit body embodies dual zipper construction wherein a removable front panel is provided between the zippers and extends upwardly to the collar.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is a major object of theinvention to provide a suit, and especially a collar construction capable of meeting the above need. Basically, the invention is embodied in a suit construction that comprises; an upright suit body with arm sleeves and a neck portion; dual zipper connections at the body front and running generally downwardly from the neck, the body having a front panel defined between the zipper connections; the neck portion defined by overlapping flaps adjacent the top of'the front insert panel; and there being interconnection layers on the flaps adapted to rapidly and releasably interconnect in response to pressure exertion pressing the layers together, for protecting the top of the front panel. As will appear, the body may consist of cotton duck, the neck portion may consist of stretchable fabric, and the interconnection layers may be defined by I VELCRO, or the like.

Further, the firstand second flaps as referredto may be integral with the front panel and have a down-folded position, the flaps when up-folded being connectible with third and fourth flaps integral with a split collar of stretchable fabric, to define an integrated closure involving the front flap and split collar, as will be seen;

and all the flaps may alternatively be integral with the split collar.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention, as well as the details of an illustrative embodiment, will be more fully understood from the following description and drawings, in which:

DRAWING DESCRIPTION FIG. 6 is an enlarged section taken on lines 6-6 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 7 is a front view of a suit neck portion embodying the invention;

FIG. 8 is a view like FIG. 7, showing another form of the invention; and

FIG. 9 isa view of the FIG. 8 neck portion fully closed.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Referring first to FIG. 2, the illustrated jump suit 10 includes a body portion 11, arm sleeves 12 and leg sleeves 13. Like zipper connections 14 and 15 at the front of the suit extend as shown from the neck top at locations 16 to the leg portion bottoms at locations 17. As a result, the suit may be quickly applied to the wearer through manipulation of the zippers in relation to the front and side panels 18 and! 11a, and in relation to the zipper connected sections 13a and 13b of the leg sleeves. When both zippers are completely disconnected, front panel 18 is disconnected from side panels 11a, and sections 13a are disconnected from sections 13b, it being clear that sections 1312 remain integral with front panel 18. When the suit has. been fitted on the jumper, the top neck portion 1.9 may be closely attached about the jumpers neck as by overlaying and connecting together flaps 19a and 19b, these for example being surfaced with hook and pile type fastering interconnection layers sold under the trademark VEL- CRO which attach when pressed together; accordingly, the top of the panel 18 is protected as is the jumpers neck, despite extreme wind forces.

The suit may consist for example of flexible fabric such as cotton duck, or other suitable material, and may be reinforced at the knees and elbows, as shown.

Merely as illustrative, 'an auxiliary sleeve is attached to at least one main sleeve (as for example an arm or leg sleeve as referred to), the auxiliary sleeve extending along the main sleeve toward an opening formed by the auxiliary sleeve to receive or trap air in a space defined between the main and auxiliary sleeves, thereby to expand the auxiliary sleeve and develop pressure tending to impede the parachutists fall. In the example shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, the main sleeve 12 is sized to closely receive the diver's arm, and the auxiliary sleeve 21 is rearwardly connected at 22 to and about main sleeve (nearthe elbow) to extend forwardly along the forearm portion 12a of the main sleeve. In this regard, the auxiliary sleeve is shown as folded at 21a for attachment to the main sleeve, and is also folded at its lower terminal 21b, for reinforcement. When the wearers forearm is directed generally downwardly (as in FIG. 1 for example) during a fall in the atmosphere, air trapped in annular space 23 between the sleeves :is pressurized by the ram effect of the relative upward velocity air tending to enter the sleeve open end 24, in the direction of arrow 25. This in turn tends to expand the auxiliary sleeve and develop force exerted upwardly on the wearers arm tending to impede his fall and permitting enhanced maneuvering control as by varied directional orientation of the wearers arm relative to the direction of fall. Note that space 23 increases in cross section toward end 24.

Merely as illustrative, the inner sleeve forearm portion 12a may be slit at 26 adjacent wrist portion 27, the latter being closely releasably retained about the wearers wrist by overlapping and interconnection of tabs 27a and 27b, the interconnection being illustrated at 28 and consisting for example of VELCRO facings, as previously referred to. Main and auxiliary sleeves as referred to may be provided in association with both arms of the diver, as seen in FIG. 2.

In the example seen in FIGS. and 6, the main sleeve 13 is sized to closely receive the divers leg, and the auxiliary sleeve 30 is rearwardly connected at 31 to and about the main sleeve (near the knee) to extend forwardly, with outward flare, along the lower leg portion 13c of the main sleeve. The auxiliary sleeve is shown as folded at 30a for attachment to the main sleeve, and is also folded at its lower terminal 30b, for reinforcement when the weare'rs lower leg is directed generally downwardly (as in FIG. 1 for example) during a fall in the atmosphere, air trapped in space 32 between the sleeves is pressurized by the ram effect of the relative upward velocity air tending to enter the sleeve open end 33, in the direction of arrow 34. This in turn tends to expand the auxiliary sleeve and develop force exerted upwardly on the wearers leg tending to impede his fall, and permitting enhanced control of maneuvering, as by raised directional orientation of the wearers leg relative to the direction of fall. Space 32 also increases in area toward end 33.

The main and auxiliary sleeves 13c and 30 may be attached together at a lengthwise extending location therealong, for added reinforcement tending to prevent relatively rearward displacement of the auxiliary sleeve relative to the main sleeve. For example, as seen in FIG. 5, the auxiliary sleeve may be attached to the main sleeve at lengthwise locations 36 and 37 adjacent opposite interconnectible zipper sections 14a and 14b, and extending to the terminal portion 38 of the main sleeve. The latter is folded as shown and contains an elastic band 39 to retain the terminal portion 38 closely about the wearer's lower leg. A U-shaped strap 40 is attached to the terminal portion 38 and sized to extend under the jumpers boot, for retaining the main sleeve against creep upwardly along the leg.

In use, the jumper or sky diver may controllably maneuver his limbs individually and/or collectively from an upwardly extended position (for maximum dropping speed) to downwardly oriented or extended postion in order to achieve desired braking of his fall and selected roll of his body. If all four limbs are oriented downwardly as in FIG. 1, near maximum braking effect is achieved. The jumper 50 is shown as carrying main and auxiliary parachutes 51 and 52.

The sleeves 21 and 30 may consist of flexible fabric such as cotton duck, canvas, or the like.

In FIG. 7, the neck portion 60 of suit 61 defines flaps 62 and 63 adapted to be brought into overlapping relation adjacent the top 64 of front panel 65. The latter is defined between upright zipper connections 66 and 67 corresponding to those seen at 14 and in FIG. 2. The flaps are integral with the split collar defined by the neck portion 60 and consisting of stretchable fabric such as wool knitting, the suit body below the collar fines first and second flaps 72 and 73 attached to panel 74 between upright zippers 75 and 76, the flaps projecting transversely oppositely. From down folded condition (along fold line 100) as seen in FIG. '8, the flaps are adapted to be folded upwardly and brought into overlapping relation with third and fourth flaps 77 and 78 respectively, integral with split collar 79 (defined by neck portion 70). Flaps 77 and 78 and collar 79 consist of stretchable fabric such as wool knit, while the suit below the collar consists of wind resistant cotton duck. VELCRO interconnection layers 81 and 82 on flaps 72 and 73 are brought into contact with similar layers 83 and 84 on flaps 77 and 78, and pressurized, to removably secure the flaps in protecting relation to the collar and panel 74, whereby a highly wind resistant assembly is defined, and in relation to the two zippers 75 and 76. In FIGS. 7-9 the tops of the two zippers, including the tabs by which the zippers are manipulated, are protected in flap interconnected condition, as described,

and against inadvertent release.

I claim:

1. In a wind resistant suit construction, the combination comprising a. an upright suit body with arm sleeves attached thereto, the body having a neck portion,

b. dual zipper connections at the front of said body and extending generally downwardly from the neck portion, the body having a front panel defined between said zipper connections,

c. the neck portion defining overlapping flaps adjacent the top extent of said panel, and

d. there being hook and pile type interconnection layers on the flaps adapted to releasably interconnect in response to pressure exertion pressing said layers together,

e. the upper terminals of the dual zippers remaining exposed directly below said neck portion when said interconnection layers are interconnected,

f. said neck portion defining a split collar and said flaps being defined by first and second flaps attached to said panel and projecting transversely oppositely, and third and fourth flaps being defined by said split collar attached to said body, said layers on the first and third flaps being pressure interconnected and said layers on the second and fourth flaps being interconnected.

2. The combination of claim 1 wherein the body below the neck portion consists of non-stretchable cotton duck, and the neck portion including said collar and flaps consists of stretchable fabric.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1973421 *Dec 27, 1932Sep 11, 1934Mina WallaceGarment
US2505239 *Mar 26, 1949Apr 25, 1950Goldstein Howard EGarment
US2580969 *Oct 21, 1947Jan 1, 1952Stephenson Verne LClosure means for child's garment
US2663873 *Jul 13, 1951Dec 29, 1953Famous Bathrobe Co IncInfant's sleeping garment
US3135256 *May 22, 1961Jun 2, 1964Surgical Appliance IndCervical collar
US3691564 *Nov 4, 1970Sep 19, 1972American Optical CorpProtective garment
FR865555A * Title not available
GB534100A * Title not available
GB786357A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4422186 *Sep 17, 1982Dec 27, 1983Loney Ann MHospital garment
US4884298 *Sep 2, 1988Dec 5, 1989Silas Cynthia LBaby feeding bib
US4922551 *Oct 31, 1988May 8, 1990George AnthesOveralls for crawling and slithering
US5036547 *Oct 20, 1989Aug 6, 1991Silas Cynthia LBaby feeding bib
US5153941 *Feb 19, 1991Oct 13, 1992Grilliot William LFirefighter's coat having adjustable and removable and replaceable chinstrap
US8347422 *Jan 9, 2006Jan 8, 2013Allen-Vanguard CorporationProtective garment
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/79, D02/602, 2/127
International ClassificationA41D13/02
Cooperative ClassificationA41D13/02
European ClassificationA41D13/02