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Publication numberUS3805506 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 23, 1974
Filing dateSep 28, 1971
Priority dateSep 28, 1970
Also published asDE2047569A1, DE2047569C2
Publication numberUS 3805506 A, US 3805506A, US-A-3805506, US3805506 A, US3805506A
InventorsStahlecker F
Original AssigneeStahlecker Gmbh Wilhelm
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mounting for spinning turbines
US 3805506 A
Abstract
A mounting arrangement for the turbine shaft of a spinning turbine machine. A spinning turbine is connected to one end of the turbine shaft while the other end of the shaft is mounted in an axial bearing support. Pairs of supporting rollers are arranged to form a wedge gap within which the turbine shaft rotates. Driving means, including either a tangential belt or a rotating disk, are provided for rotating the turbine shaft. The driving means are angularly adjustable so as to exert an axial thrust on the turbine shaft in the direction of the axial bearing support during the operation of the machine. Braking means are provided which are angularly adjustable for also exerting an axial thrust on the turbine shaft during braking. Auxiliary axial thrust producing devices, such as air screws, magnets, and the like can also be used to hold the turbine shaft against the axial bearing support.
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United States-Patent [191 Stahlecker MOUNTING FOR SPINNING TURBINES Fritz Stahl ecker, Bad Uberkingen, Germany Assignee: Wilhelm Stahlecker GmbH Filed: Sept. 28, 1971 Appl. No.: 184,503

Inventor:

US. Cl 57/78, 57/58.89, 57/105 Int. Cl D01h l/24, D0lh 7/22, DOlh 1/12 Field of Search 57/58.89, 58.91, 58.93, 57/101, 103, 104, 105, 77.3, 77.33, 77.35, 77.37, 77.45, 88, 129, 78, 130; 74/203, 221, 410, 432, 433; 64/1, 3; 308/174, 175

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 10/1958 Schrenk et al 57/77.3 8/1960 Fisher 308/174 X 3/1964 Noordenbos 57/77.45

Franzen 57/130 X Apr. 23, 1974 3,599,414 8/1971 Polyakousky et al 57/129 X Primary Examiner-John W. Huckert Assistant Examiner-Charles Gorenstein Attorney, Agent, or FirmCraig and Antonelli [5 7] ABSTRACT A mounting arrangement for the turbine shaft of a spinning turbine machine. A spinning turbine is connected to one end of the turbine shaft while the other end of the shaft is mounted in an axial bearing support. Pairs of supporting rollers are arranged to form a wedge gap within which the turbine shaft rotates. Driving means, including either a tangential belt or a rotating disk, are provided for rotating the turbine shaft. The driving means are angularly adjustable so as to exert an axial thrust on the turbine shaft in the direction of the axial bearing support during the operation of the machine. Braking means are provided which are angularly adjustable for also exerting an axial thrust on the turbine shaft during braking. Auxiliary axial thrust producing devices, such as air screws, magnets, and the like can also be used to hold the turbine shaft against the axial bearing support.

44 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures PATENTEDAPR 23 I974 SHEET 1 [1F 4 1 MOUNTING FOR SPINNING TURBINES BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a mounting for spinning turbines of the type which work on the open-end principle and includes a turbine running in a housing chamber or the like provided with a fiber inlet and a fiber outlet, the turbine having a turbine shaft connected to it.

It is known for the spinning turbines of open-end spinning machines to be mounted in rolling contact bearings. However at rotational speeds of approximatelyFgQQQO revolutions per minute these bearings become very highly stressed. At higher rotational speeds it becomes very difficult and very uneconomical to continue to use rolling contact bearings.

In order to avoid these difficult'ies it has already been proposed to use step-up mountings of the type known for similar use for rotating tubes in the false twisting process. However, this type of arrangement causes considerable difficulties, due mainly to the fact that spinning turbines have considerably greater mass than and,

.unlike the high speed rotating tubes in false twisting processes, must be guided very accurately in the axial direction in order to correctly and accurately carry out their spinning functions. Considerable problems occur in particular during the acceleration of the spinning turbine up to operating speed and during the deceleration of the turbine in order to deal with a thread breakage.

. It has not appeared to be advisable'for the turbine shaft to be held in the wedge gap of pairs of supporting rollers without any additional means other than with the aid of permanent magnets. With this arrangement it would be necessary to provide substantially more powerful, and therefore more expensive, magnets than in the case of known drives for rotating tubes. These larger magnets would, in turn, require an increased consumption of power.

If the turbine shaft is driven with the aid of the supporting rollers, which in turn are driven by a belt or band, considerable slip occurs between the coverings of the supporting rollers and the turbine shaft when the machine is put into operation. Consequently the coverings wear too quickly and frequently become damaged, leading to uneven running of the turbine. In order to avoid this disadvantage it has already been proposed that the driving means should be allowed to act directly on the turbine shaft. The unavoidable starting slip when the machine is started up then occurs between the turbine shaft, which is made of steel, and the driving means, so that the coverings of the supporting rollers are spared. An unfavorable feature of this lastmentioned arrangement resulted from the fact that, during braking, the driving means was lifted off of the turbine shaft, such that the turbine and its turbine shaft were no longer reliably held in the wedge gap guide and were liable to perform skipping or wobbling movements. Additional magnetic securing means of the type used for rotating tubes were found inadequate. Also, if the magnets are given sufficiently large dimensions, excessive heat would be generated leading to damage to the coverings of the supporting rollers.

It has also been proposed to provide an axial mounting for the turbine by running the turbine shaft with its free end on a thrust bearing. However, this proposed arrangement did not lead to adequate operational reliability. Above all, it was found disadvantageous that the axial force could not possibly be adjusted with sufficient accuracy, such that excessive differences occurred from one spinning station to another. In addition, this arrangement was also'unsatisfactory because the reaction force produced by the longitudinal thrust of the turbine shaft could not be absorbed by suitable means. v

It has also been proposed to secure the turbine shaft with the aid of starting collars which run against the supporting rollers. A similar proposal provides channels in the turbine shaft with the correspondingly profiled supporting roller coverings running in the channels. These arrangements were disadvantageous in that very great wear could be expected, so that they are at most suitable as short term securing means, which, for example, can take over axial fastening only during the elimination of thread breaks. In addition, it is unsuitable for the turbine shaft to be provided with collars for axial fastening or for magnet fastening, since it cannot then be dismantled in a convenient manner.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION A basic object of the present invention is to provide, with simply constructed means, a mounting of the type first mentioned above which avoids the disadvantages described and ensures smooth running over an adequately long life, without hindering the ability .to make individual adjustments, some of which are necessary. The invention resides, in part, in that the turbine shaft is pressed axially on to an axial bearing disposed at its end remote from the turbine, while radially the shaft is guided in a wedge gap formed by pairs of supporting rollers spaced apart from one another in the direction of the axis of the turbine shaft and disposed between the housing chamber and the axial bearing, and in which the turbine shaft is subjected to pressure by radially adjustable driving means during the operation of the turbines and by braking means pressing radially against the shaft during braking of the turbine. Through the cooperation of the individual parts, a mounting is provided in which the turbine, together with its turbine shaft, is not only driven in an operationally reliable manner but is also secured in position.

The driving means have not only the function of transmitting the driving force but also the function of securing the turbine shaft in the wedge gap through the accurately adjustable pressure applied by the driving means during operation.

In an advantageous embodiment of the invention, two pairs of supporting rollers, preferably mounted symmetrically with respect to the driving means, are provided. The driving means acts directly on the turbine shaft in the region between the pairs of supporting rollers to push the shaft in the direction of the wedge gap formed by the supporting rollers. This embodiment provides the advantage that during operation of the turbine, including during the braking condition and during the rest condition, the turbine shaft is reliably secured in the wedge gap of the supporting rollers without any special additional, cost-increasing means being required for the purpose.

In a further development of the invention, provision is made for axial thrust on the turbine shaft to be produced by the driving means. This is achieved by an angular adjustment of the driving means and/or driving rollers such that the driving means exerts a force component in the direction of the turbine shaft axis in addition to the driving force acting tangentially on the shaft. In addition to driving the turbine and securing the turbine shaft in the wedge gap, the driving means also assists in the longitudinal securing of the turbine shaft and turbine by producing a longitudinal thrust in the direction of the axial bearing disposed at its end.

A particularly advantageous embodiment of the invention comprises disposing the supporting rollers in a common bearing holder which is disposed between the rear wall of the housing chamber and the axial bearing of the turbine shaft in such a manner as to be radially adjustable in relation to the axis of the turbine shaft. A bearing unit is thereby obtained which can be conveniently checked with the aid of simple checking gauges outside the machine, so that subsequent installation is possible without time consuming assembly work. In this case it is particularly advantageous for the bearing holder to be slidable in guides and disposed on a bearing support receiving the housing chamber and the axial bearing. This arrangement provides a bearing unit, which includes the supporting rollers and the axial bearing, which can be removed as a self-contained unit and adjusted outside the machine. By grouping together the supporting roller and bearing arrangement to form a self-contained bearing unit, accurate adjustment and hence, the exact positioning of the turbine axis is ensured. In particular, a slightly inclined position selected in relation to the driving means can be adjusted with great accuracy, thus making it possible for the value of the axial thrust on the axial bearing to be adjusted so as to be approximately equal in all turbines. This is particularly important because, if a widetolerance range is adopted in order to ensure the minimum of the axial thrust required in all turbines, too high a maximum value might occur in some turbines. The axial thrust should not exceed a predetermined value in order to preclude excessive heating of the axial bearing and consequent increased wear. The axial thrust should only be so great that after taking into account the reduced pressure prevailing in the turbine chamber there will still be applied to the axial bearing a longitudinal pressure which is sufficientto ensure that any outward drift of the turbine is reliably prevented. Substantially identical running conditions for all the turbines can thus be ensured at all the spinning stations.

Since the driving means is not lifted off the turbine shaft when the turbine is stopped, but rather the pressure applied by it is only completely or partly reduced, the driving means, in the form of a driving belt or driving roller, slips with slight pressure over the turbine shaft, whereby various surprising advantages are achieved. Firstly, the turbine shaft is prevented from being left without guidance even for a short period of time, such as could possibly otherwise result due to errors in assembly or manufacture causing the full action of the brake to be applied belatedly. In addition, because of the resulting turbulent air flow, the slipping of the driving means on the turbine shaft does not lead to detrimental heating. On the contrary, this slipping produces particularly smooth and even starting when the turbine is put in to action again after release at the brake means. Also, due to the contact of the driving means with the shaft, one pressure roller or the like is sufficient for each spinning unit in order to load the driving means with adjustable pressure. Furthermore,

the additional advantage is obtained that even during braking the desired axial thrust can be applied to the turbine shaft through the action of the driving means. Moreover, during the braking operation, the driving means slipping with slight pressure over the turbine shaft provides a good damping effect and the slow running-down required in turbine spinning is achieved.

These and further objects, features and advantages of the present invention will become more obvious from the following description when taken in connection with the accompanying drawing which shows, for purposes of illustration only, several embodiments in accordance with the present invention, and wherein:

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a cross-section through a first embodiment of mounting constructed according to the invention,

FIG. 2 is a side view, in the direction of the arrow II, of the mounting shown in FIG. 1,

FIG. 3 is a similar section to FIG. 1 through a number of mountings according to the invention,

FIG. 4 is a plan view of a second embodiment,

FIG. 4A is a partial schematic view illustrating a modification of part of the arrangement of FIG. 4,

FIG. 5 is a side view of a third embodiment,

FIG. 6 is a section through a fourth embodiment, and

FIG. 7 is a plan view of a fifth embodiment of the invention,

FIG. 7A is a partial plan view of a sixth embodiment of the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to the drawing wherein like reference numerals are used throughout the various views to represent like parts, and more particularly to FIGS. 1 and 2, the turbine shaft 1 of a spinning turbine 2 is driven by adriving belt 3, which is in the form of a tangential belt. The horizontally extending turbine shaft 1 lies in a wedge gap formed by two pairs of supporting rollers 4. The spinning turbine 2 is provided with inlet I and outlet 0 as schematically illustrated in FIG. 2. The bearings 5 of the pairs of supporting rollers are accommodated in a common bearing holder 6 provided with guides which are open at the top in which the bearings 5 are held by spring elements 7 which can conveniently be released by turning or sliding. This bearing unit composed of the bearings 5, the supporting rollers 4, and the bearing holder 6 is fastened to a vertical surface of a base 8 by means of fastening screws 9. The height of the bearing holder 6 can be conveniently adjusted. Also this bearing holder 6, together with the appertaining bearings 5 and supporting rollers 4, can conveniently be removed in the upward direction after undoing the fastening screws 9. On the base 8, which is constructed as a bearing support, there is fastened a turbine housing 10 which is provided with a housing chamber for the turbine 2. The rear wall of the turbine housing 10 is provided with a bore 11 through which the shaft 1 of the turbine 2 passes. An axial bearing 12 for supporting the end of the turbine shaft 1 is disposed in line with this bore 11 and is carried by a holder 13 connected to the base 8. The turbine housing 10 and the holder 13 may also be made in one piece with the base 8 in a manner similar to the arrangement illustrated in FIG. 7. Together with the turbine housing 10 and the holder 13, the base 8 forms an approximately U-shaped bearing support which is open at the top in the direction of the turbine shaft 1 or driving belt 3. Theholder 13 is provided with a bore 14 extending in the direction of the turbine shaft 1. A cylindrical thrust bearing 15, which is secured in the axial direction by securing nuts 16, is received within this bore 14. By moving the securing nuts 16, this bearing 15 is adjustable in the axial direction.

For the purpose of adjusting the height of the supporting rollers 4 it is convenient to use an adjusting shaft which is pushed through the bores 11 and 14 and is thus accurately guided prior to insertion of the turbine shaft 1. The bearing holder 6 is pushed upwards by means of a guage which can be inserted between it and the base 8, so that 'the supporting rollers 4 lie against the adjusting shaft. The fastening screws 9 are then tightened, so that the supporting rollers 4, which are preferably provided with regrindable'coverings, assume the correct vertical position with great accuracy. This adjustment can bemade outside of the machine.

The bearing holder 6 is fastened on the base 8 in an inclined position differing slightly from 90 with respect to the driving belt 3. In order to be able to adjust this inclined position, the bearing holder 6 may be fastened swivellably on the base 8. It is also possible for the base 8 to be disposed on a cross-member 17, extending in the longitudinal direction of the machine, in such a manner as to be'rotatable on a pin 18 for adjustment of the slightly inclined position in relation to the driving belt 3.

The driving belt 3 is pressed or forced against the turbine shaft 1 by means of a pressing or forcing roller 19. The roller 19, the side flanges of which provide lateral guidance for the driving belt 3, is mounted on a doublearmed lever 20, which is mounted rotatably on the turbinehousing 10 by means of a pin 21. When the turbine 2 is running, the double-armed lever 20 is pulled downwards by means of a stop 22 on a control rod 23 into the desired position. Between the double-armed lever 20 and the stop 22 there is provided a spacer 24. This spacer 24 is preferably made of plastic material having athickness whereby the depth of lowering of the roller 19 can be determined. This spacer 24 has a slot which is open on one side, so that it canconveniently be fitted and removed by hand.

' In order to avoid vibration of the machine it is convenient for the roller 19 to be fixed in a vertical predetermined position when the turbine 2 is running. The vertical position of roller 19 can be fixed during assembly of the machine. Since the tangential belt 3, which extends over a plurality of spinning stations, runs along the machine with different tensions at the various stations, different pressures pressing the turbine shaft into the wedge gap between the supporting rollers 4 would normally be. produced on the individual turbine shafts. This disadvantage can be overcome by giving the rollers 19 different depths of penetration in each case, so that the belt tensions are balanced and so that the pressure on the turbine shaft 1 in the wedge gap is kept the same at all the spinning stations. The different depths of penetration are achieved by utilizing spacers 24 of different thicknesses. These spacers are conveniently made of plastic materials of different colors to make it easier to select the proper one.

For the purpose of braking the turbine 2, the doublearmed lever 20 is raised by means of the control rod 23. End 25 of lever 20 extends beyond its pin 21 to operate a brake 26. The brake 26 is in the form of a leaf spring which is provided with brake shoes 27 bearing against the turbine shaft 1 on both sides of the driving belt 3 as can be seen in FIG. 5. The brake 26, is approximately U-shaped and is held on the pin 21 of the double-armed' lever 20 and on another pin 28. The pin 28 is fastened eccentrically onto the turbine housing 10, such that when it is turned the vertical position of the brake shoes 27 in relation to the turbine shaft 1 can be accurately adjusted.

I During braking the driving belt 3 is no longer pressed down by the roller 19. As the result. of its dead weight and also under the action of the rollers 19 of adjoining units it slips on the braked turbine shaft 1. It is thereby made impossible for the turbine shaft 1 to be subjected to a shock through the rapid lowering of the driving belt 3 and thereby wobbling-when the turbine is started up again. On the contrary, starting is smooth and free from flutter. The driving belt 3, which remains continuously'in contact with the turbine shaft 1, can apply a very good damping action to the turbine shaft 1.

For removal of the driving means, which is in the form of the driving belt 3, the double-armed lever 20 together with the roller 19 is turned upwards. The brake 26 is displaced in such a manner that its trough 29 engages the pin 21, so that the space above the driving belt 3 becomes free and the driving belt can then be conveniently taken out in the direction of the open side of the unit.-

The supporting rollers 4 are disposed symmetrically under the driving belt 3 and the distance between them is greater than the distance between the support rollers closest to the turbine housing and the turbine housing 10. In this way the tipping of the mounting is reliably avoided, so that the driving belt 3 can press the turbine shaft 1 sufficiently firmly into the wedge gap formed by the supporting rollers 4 without risk of premature wear of the mountings. Since the brake shoes 27 of the brake 26 are also disposed symmetrically in relation to the driving belt 3 and consequently to the pairs of supporting rollers, tipping of the mounting is prevented during braking, such that the braking force can also be selected to be sufficiently great without risk of premature wear.

During the operation of the turbine, during braking, and when the turbine is at rest, the turbine shaft 1 is adequately secured in the wedge gap of the supporting rollers 4, without additional means being necessary. Since the driving belt acts directly on the turbine shaft 1 and at the same time through an inclined position also ensures the longitudinal fastening of the turbine shaft in its axial bearing 12, and since, in addition, these two functions are taken over when the turbine is stationary by the similarly acting brake 26, the provision of retain-' ing magnets and additional supporting rollers can be dispensed with. With the described arrangement, the non-tipping, stable fastening of the turbine shaft 1 is ensured.

Through the special construction, and in particular, through the nature of the axial fastening, it is possible for the turbine shaft 1 to be made smooth or at least to have the same diameter over its entire length, without guide collars or the like of larger diameter being required. Consequently the turbine 2, together with its turbine shaft 1, can be pulled out axially without previous removal of the driving belt 3 and without other dismantling work. If for technical reasons connected with spinning the turbine 2 has to be replaced, this replacement can be effected at any time with minimum expenditure of labor. In order to facilitate the introduction of the turbine shaft 1, it is provided at its end remote from the turbine 2 with a conical bevel.

The necessary axial thrust of the turbine shaft 1 against its axial bearing 12 is preferably produced with the direct aid of the driving belt 3 by slightly inclining the turbine shaft 1 in relation to the running direction of the driving belt 3. It is, however, also possible to produce, or at least to assist, the axial thrust in other ways, without substantially greater expense for construction. For example, the axial thrust can be produced by air pressure which is produced by an air screw or ventilator disposed on the turbine shaft 1 or on the turbine 2 itself. The turbine shaft 1 may also be provided with a disc in the immediate proximity of the rear wall of the turbine housing 10, so that between the rear wall of the housing and this disc an air cushion is produced which provides the axial thrust. In addition, the axial thrust may be produced, or at least assisted, by means of magnets M schematically depicted in FIG. 7A. In order to produce, or at least the axial thrust, use may also be made of the weight of the turbine 2 and of the turbine shaft 1 when the turbine 2 and the turbine shaft 1 are disposed vertically or in a vertically inclined position. Additional weights may also be provided for this purpose. It is also possible to make the turbine shaft 1 slightly conical, thereby producing the axial thrust. Similarly, for the same purpose slight deviations of parallelism of the supporting rollers 4 in relation to one another may be provided. The supporting roller coverings may also be ground slightly conical or have slightly different diameters. Use could also be made of the action of air pressure inside the housing chamber.

FIG. 3 shows the arrangement of three juxtaposed units 30, 31, and 32, each of which corresponds to the form of construction illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2. It can clearly be seen that all three mountings constitute separate constructional units which are disposed on the common cross-member 17. The middle unit 31 is shown in the braked position, the common driving belt 3 no longer being pressed down by its pressing roller 19. Consequently it slips, under slight pressure resulting from its dead weight and also under the action of the roller 19 of the neighboring unit 30, on the braked turbine shaft 1.

As FIG. 3 further shows, viewed in the direction of running of the guiding belt 3, which is indicated by the arrow 33, the pressing rollers 19 are disposed in each case downstream of the turbine shaft 1.

FIG. 4 is a plan view of a mounting which corresponds essentially to the form of construction already described. The shaft 1 of the turbine 2 is mounted in a wedge gap formed by two pairs of supporting rollers 4 and is driven by a driving belt 3 and at the same time pressed thereby into this wedge gap. The bearings 5 of the supporting rollers 4 are disposed in a common bearing holder 6, which in turn is fastened on a base 8. The turbine housing is also mounted on this base 8 or is made in one piece with the latter. The roller 19, which, viewed in the direction of running of the driving belt 3 indicated by the arrow 34, lies downstream of the turbine shaft 1, is mounted in this embodiment with the aid of a lever 35 on a pin 36 of the bearing holder 6. Consequently, the mounting is open in the direction away from the side of the turbine housing 10, so that when the lever 35 is raised and the brake (not shown) is swivelled or pushed away, the driving belt 3 can conveniently be inserted and removed again.

The bearing holder 6; and consequently the bearings 5, and the supporting rollers 4 are disposed with a slight inclination in relation to the driving belt 3, so that the wedge gap formed by the supporting rollers 4 likewise lies with a slight inclination in relation to the driving belt 3 and holds the turbine shaft 1 in a slightly inclined position. Consequently, the driving belt 3 produces a force component on the turbine shaft 1 in the direction of its axis. This force component is absorbed by axial bearing 12, which is provided at the end of the turbine shaft 1 and which is likewise mounted on the base 8 in a manner not shown in detail. The reaction forces thus applied to the driving belt 3 by all of the spinning stations along the entire machine are thus added together to form a lateral thrust which attempts to displace the driving belt 3 in the direction of the turbine housings 10. In order to balance this lateral thrust, the roller 19 is oppositely inclined such that an opposite lateral thrust is produced, by means of which an at least approximate state of equilibrium is achieved, whereby smooth, reliable running of the driving belt 3 is obtained. Given adequately robust dimensions, the lateral thrust could also be taken entirely or partially by a side flange 37 on the pressing roller 19. In this case a slight twisting of the pressing roller 19 is likewise convenient, since the driving belt is then prevented from bearing excessively against the side flange 37, so that the wear on the driving belt 3 is considerably reduced.

The brake device (not specifically illustrated for this embodiment) is constructed similarly to the embodiment of FIGS. 1-3 so that the driving belt 3 slips with reduced pressure over the stationary shaft 1 during the braked condition. This provides the advantage that even during the braking operation the turbine shaft 1 is provided with the desired axial thrust in the direction of the axial bearing 12 until the shaft comes to rest.

In the case of increased rotational speeds it will be convenient for the axial bearing 12 to be provided with a device for continuous lubrication. For example, the axial bearing 12 may be connected to a centrally controlled oil lubrication system. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 4, the axial bearing is in the form of a footstep plate 38 which is mounted on a traversing bar 39 movable in the longitudinal direction of the machine. At suitable intervals of time, which are controlled by the machine itself, this traversing bar 39 is moved slightly, whereby the footstep plate 38 is pulled through an oil reservoir 40 and then pushed back again into the working position. In this way, an adequate film of oil is formed on the footstep plate 38, so that the friction between the turbine shaft 1 and the footstep plate 38 is reduced. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 4, the turbine stem 1 is provided with an exchangeable end piece 41, which has a dished end face. This exchangeable end piece 41 may also be used, when necessary, for shifting the axial position of the turbine 2 in stages, for which purpose end pieces 41 of different lengths may be used. FIG. 4A illustrates a modified end piece 41' in the form of an insertion cone.

In the embodiment according to FIG. 5, which corresponds substantially to the embodiment according to FIGS. 1 and 2 with additional provisions for securing the turbine 2 and the turbine shaft 1 in position during braking and when the turbine is at rest. In this embodiment, the turbine shaft l is provided with conical tapered portions 42 at the points at which the brake shoes 27 of the brake 26 are applied. Through this conicity of the turbine shaft 1 and of the brake shoes 27, an additional axial thrust in the direction of the axial bearing 12 is produced when the brake 26 is in action, whereby operational reliability is further improved. This form of construction appears particularly convenient in the case of turbines 2 which are larger in size or which run at very'high speeds.

In all embodiments it is convenient for the pressing or forcing roller 19 to be disposed in the immediate proximity of the turbine shaft 1. Not only does this provide the advantage of compact'construction, but in addition it ensures that the amount of power required and the wear on the driving belt 3 are favorably influenced. Even with very slight depth of penetration, a roller I9 disposed near the turbine shaft 1 ensures adequate driving of the turbine shaft 1. The consequent small deflection of the belt, referred to a completely straight belt run, minimizes the energy required to operate the belt. In special cases, particularly in the case of higher speeds, the roller 19 may even be disposed resiliently directlyabove the turbine shaft 1, so that the belt runs completely straight, which provides optimum values in respect of power requirements.

FIG. 6 illustrates an embodiment of the invention in which a driving disc or driving roller 43 is provided as driving means. This driving disc 43 is driven in the counterclockwise direction as viewed in FIG. 6 by means of a band 44 and a pulley 45. In this embodiment also the turbine shaft 1 lies in a wedge gap formed by two pairs of supporting rollers 4. The supporting rollers are mounted in a common bearing holder 6 similarly to the previously described embodiments. The driving disc 43, which is provided with a damping covering, is mounted on a lever 46 which is swivellable about a pin 47. The pressure applied by the driving disc 43 to the turbine shaft 1 is produced by means of the band 44 and by a spring 48 acting on the lever 46. The axis of rotation of the driving disc 43 is slightly inclined with respect to the turbine shaft 1, so that here again an axial thrust is produced in the turbine shaft 1, which is supported in a corresponding axial bearing. In this embodiment of the invention, the additional advantage is obtained that because of the additional step-up ratio between the driving disc 43 and the turbine shaft 1 the band 44 runs at a reduced speed as compared to the belt 3 in the other embodiments. An individual band may be provided for each turbine unit, but it is also possible for a plurality of units to be driven by means of the same band, thus forming a group drive.

The lever 46 is extended beyond its pivot 47 and is connected to a control rod 49. The control rod 49 is provided with movable projections 50 by means of which it is possible to operate a brake 51 which is provided with brake shoes 52 lying symmetrically in relation to the driving disc 43 and adapted to be pressed against the turbine shaft 1. It is also possible to operate the brake 51 with the aid of expansion means, such as an eccentric or the like, disposed between it and the lever 46, these expansion means being, for example, connected to and adapted to be operated by the hinged portion of the spinning box. In this embodiment of the invention a covering cap 53 covering the bearing unit adjoins the turbine housing 19. The purpose of this covering cap 53 is to provide insulation from the high frequency noises produced when the belt or band 42 is running and the turbine shaft 1 is also running. In order to obtain the most uniform possible load distribution, it is also convenient in this embodiment for the pairs of supporting rollers 4 to be disposed symmetrically in relation to the driving disc 43. In some circumstances it may also be convenient to provide, instead of a single driving disc 43, a pair of driving discs disposed symmetrically to the band 44.

The embodiment according to FIG. 7 once again corresponds s ubstantially to that according to FIGS. 1 and- /or 5. Here again two pairs of supporting rollers 4 form a wedge gap in which the shaft 1 of a turbine 2 is mounted. The bearings 5 of the supporting rollers 4 are disposed in a bearing holder 6 which is fastened on a base 8. Base 8, along with the turbine housing 10 and the holder 13 for the axial bearing 12 are formed into a one-piece U-shaped bearing support. In the case of this bearing unit, the driving means, together with its pressing or forcing roller or the like and the corresponding brake unit are not illustrated, but may be constructed in accordance with one of the prior described embodiments of the invention. In this embodiment of the invention, the axial thrust of the turbine shaft 1 is produced by means of an air screw 54 which isfastened on the turbine shaft ll near the axial bearing 12. ln this embodiment it should be observed that when the rotational speed of the turbine shaft I is reduced by braking the axial thrust is likewise reduced. The axial bearing 12 is in the form of a cylindrical thrust bearing 55, which can be axially adjusted and secured by means of a screw 56 and a nut 57. A lubricating device 58 fastened on the holder 13 is provided for the thrust bearing 55 and with the aid of a nozzle sprays continuously at suitable intervals of time between the end of the turbine shaft 1 and the thrust bearing 55. FIG. 7A schematically illustrates a modified arrangement which is similar in all respects to the arrangement of FIG. 7 except for the replacement of the air screw 54 for providing auxiliary thrust forces with schematically illustrated magnets M.

While I have shown and described various specific embodiments in accordance with the present invention, it is understood that the same is not limited thereto but is susceptible of numerous changes and modifications as known to those skilled in the art, and I therefore do not wish to be limited tothe details shown and described herein, but intend to cover all such changes and modifications as are within the scope of those skilled in the art.

What I claim is:

l. A mounting arrangement for spinning turbine machines of the type which work on the open-end principle and include fiber inlet and outlet means; said arrangement comprising: a turbine shaft, a housing chamber, a spinning turbine attached to one end of the turbine shaft for running in the housing chamber, axial bearing means operatively disposed for supporting the other end of the turbine shaft against axial forces, wedge gap means formed by at least one pair of supporting rollers positioned between the housing chamber and the axial bearing means for rotatably supporting the turbine shaft, driving means for rotating the turbine shaft, braking means for applying braking forces to the turbine shaft, and means for producing an axial thrust on the turbine shaft against the axial bearing means.

2. A mounting arrangement according to claim 1, characterized in that said wedge gap means includes at least two pairs of supporting rollers, said pairs of rollers being spaced from one another along the axial extent of the turbine shaft.

3. A mounting arrangement according to claim 2, characterized in that bearing support means are provided for holding the axial bearing means, in that bearing holder means are provided for holding the supporting rollers, and in that the bearing support means, the bearing holder and associated rollers, the turbine shaft and the braking means are constructed as a selfcontained unit which can be removed as a whole from the machine for adjustment and repairs.

4. A mounting arrangement according to claim 2, characterized in that said driving means includes radially adjustable pressing means for engaging at least a portion of the periphery of said turbine shaft to turn said turbine shaft.

5. A mounting arrangement according to claim 4, characterized in that two pairs of rollers are mounted symmetrically for engagement with the turbine shaft on axially spaced opposite sides of the portion of the shaft engaged by the pressing means, said rollers further being disposed substantially radially oppositely with respect to said pressing means such as to support the turbine shaft against radial movement resulting from engagement of the pressing means.

6. A mounting arrangement according to claim 5, characterized in that the supporting rollers are supported in a common bearing holder, said bearing holder being disposed between a rear wall of the housing chamber and the axial bearing means, said bearing holder being radially adjustable with respect to the axis of the turbine shaft.

7. A mounting arrangement according to claim 5, characterized in that the pair of supporting rollers closest to the spinning turbine is disposed immediately adjacent the housing chamber and in that the pressing means presses against the turbine shaft approximately in the middle between the pairs of supporting rollers.

8. A mounting arrangement according to claim 7, characterized in that the axial bearing means includes a thrust bearing disposed with a sliding fit in a cylindrical bore, said cylindrical bore being in a first bearing support arm positioned opposite a bearing bore provided on a second bearing support arm, said second bearing support arm being adjacent the housing chamber in the assembled condition, said cylindrical bore and said bearing bore forming reference points for the adjustment of the supporting rollers.

9. A mounting arrangement according to claim 7, characterized in that the pressing means of the driving means includes rotating disk means which engages a portion of the periphery of the turbine shaft.

10. A mounting arrangement according to claim 9, characterized in that the force exerted on the turbine shaft by the braking means includes an axial component such that an axial thrust in the direction of the axial bearing means is exerted on the turbine shaft during braking.

11. A mounting arrangement according to claim 10, characterized by adjustment means for adjusting the relative position of the forcing roller and the braking means on the double armed lever so that the timing of the engagement of the driving means and braking means can be varied.

12. A mounting arrangement according to claim 7, characterized in that the braking means presses against the turbine shaft at an axial location midway between the pairs of supporting rollers, said braking means being pivotable into and out of engagement with the turbine shaft.

13. A mounting arrangement according to claim 12, characterized in that the pressing means of the driving means is a belt extending tangentially to the turbine shaft.

14. A mounting arrangement according to claim 12, characterized in that the force exerted on the turbine shaft by the braking means includes an axial component such that an axial thrust in the direction of the axial bearing means is exerted on the turbine shaft during braking.

15. A mounting arrangement according to claim 7, characterized in that the pressing means of the driving means is a belt extending tangentially to the turbine shaft.

16. A mounting arrangement according to claim 15, characterized in that the braking means presses against the turbine shaft at an axial location midway between the pairs of supporting rollers, said braking means being pivotable into and out of engagement with the turbine shaft.

17. A mounting arrangement according to claim 15, characterized in that the braking means is operatively connected to a movable double armed lever on which is mounted a forcing roller for forcing the belt into driving engagement with the turbine shaft, said forcing roller and said braking means being positioned on the double armed lever such that the braking means is brought into engagement with the turbine shaft upon movement of the double armed lever to remove the forcing roller from a position forcing the belt into driving engagement with the turbine shaft.

18. A mounting arrangement according to claim 17, characterized by adjustment means for adjusting the relative position of the forcing roller and the braking means on the double armed lever so that the timing of the engagement of the driving means and braking means can be varied.

19. A mounting arrangement according to claim 17, characterized in that the braking means has means to exert an axial component of force on the turbine shaft during braking in the direction of the axial bearing means.

20. A mounting arrangement according to claim 19, characterized by adjustment means for adjusting the relative position of the forcing roller and the braking means on the double armed lever so that the timing of the engagement of the driving means and braking means can be varied.

21. A mounting arrangement according to claim 7, characterized in that the means for producing the axial thrust on the turbine shaft includes the driving means, said driving means being angularly adjustable with respect to the turbine shaft and the supporting rollers such that the driving means exerts an axial component of force on the turbine shaft while rotating the turbine shaft.

' 22. A mounting arrangement according to claim 21, characterized in that the axial bearing means includes a thrust bearing disposed with a sliding fit in a cylindrical bore, said cylindrical bore being in a first bearing support arm positioned opposite a bearing bore provided on a second bearing support arm, said second bearing support arm being adjacent the housing chamber in the assembled condition, said cylindrical bore and said bearing bore forming reference points for the adjustment of the supporting rollers.

23. A mounting arrangement according to claim 21, characterized in that said driving means includes means angularly adjustable with respect to the turbine shaft and acting on the pressing means for counteracting the reaction forces acting on the angularly inclined driving means by way of the turbine shaft.

24. A mounting arrangement according to claim 21, characterized in that the supporting rollers are supported in a common bearing holder, said bearing holder being disposed between a rear wall of the housing chamber and the axial bearing means, said bearing holder being radially adjustable with respect to the axis of the turbine shaft.

25. A mounting arrangement according to claim 24, characterized in that the common bearing holder is slidably mounted in bearing holder guides provided on a bearing support, said bearing support being connected to the housing chamber.

26. A mounting arrangement according to claim 25, characterized in that the turbine shaft is smooth over substantially its entire length, said turbine shaft having a diameter smaller than a .bore provided in one arm of the bearing support adjacent the housing chamber.

27. A mounting arrangement according to claim 25, characterized in that the bearing support is substantially U-shaped with the bearing holder disposed between its arms, the wedge gap means formed by the supporting rollers opening upwardly in the same direction as the U opens.

28. A mounting arrangement according to claim 27, characterized in that supporting roller bearing means are positioned in supporting roller guides in the bearing holder, said supporting roller guides being open in the direction of the open side of the U-shaped bearing support, and in that easily detachable means are provided for holding the supporting roller bearing means in place.

29. A mounting arrangement according to claim 1, characterized in that the means for producing the axial thrust on the turbine shaft includes the driving means, said driving means being angularly adjustable with respect to the axis of the turbine shaft and the supporting rollers such that the driving means exerts an axial component of force on the turbine shaft while rotating the turbine shaft.

30. A mounting arrangement to claim 29, characterized in that the means for producing the axial thrust on the turbine shaft further includes auxiliary means operatively engaging said turbine shaft at positions other than respective positions of engagement of said turbine shaft with said driving means.

31. A mounting arrangement according to claim 30, characterized in that said auxiliary means include magnetic means operatively engaging with said turbine shaft.

32. A mounting arrangement according to claim 30,

characterized in that said auxiliary means include air M screw means operatively engaging with said turbine shaft.

33. A mounting arrangement according to claim 1, characterized in that the means for producing the axial thrust on the turbine shaft includes means operatively engaging said turbine shaft at positions other than respective positions of engagement of said turbine shaft with said drivingmeans.

34. A mounting arrangement according to claim 33, characterized in that said means for producing axial thrust include magnetic means operatively engaging with said turbine shaft.

35. A mounting arrangement according to claim 33, characterized in that said means for producing axial thrust include air screw means operatively engaging with said turbine shaft.

36. A mounting arrangement according to claim 35, characterized in that said air screw means is mounted for-rotation with said turbine shaft.

37. A mounting arrangement according to claim 1, characterized in that the supporting rollers are supported in a common bearing holder, said bearing holder being disposed between a rear wall of the housing chamber and the axial bearing means, said bearing holder being radially adjustable with respect to the axis of the turbine shaft.

38. A mounting arrangement according to claim 1, characterized in that the axial bearing means includes a thrust bearing disposed with a sliding fit in a cylindrical bore, said cylindrical bore being in a first bearing support arm positioned opposite a bearing bore provided on a second bearing support arm, said second bearing support arm being adjacent the housing chamber in the assembled condition, said cylindrical bore and said bearing bore forming reference points for the adjustment of the supporting rollers.

39. A mounting arrangement according to claim 1,

I characterized in that bearing support means are provided for holding the axial bearing means, in the bearing holder means are provided for holding the supporting rollers, and in that the bearing support means, the bearing holder and associated rollers, the turbine shaft and the braking means are constructed as a selfcontained unit which can be removed as a whole from the machine for adjustment and repairs.

40. A mounting arrangement for spinning turbine machines comprising: a turbine shaft, a housing chamber, a spinning turbine attached to one end of the turbine shaft for running in the housing chamber, axial bearing means operatively disposed for supporting the other end of the turbine shaft against axial forces, wedge gap means formed by at least one pair of supporting rollers positioned between the housing chamber and the axial bearing means for rotatably supporting the turbine shaft, driving means for rotating the turbine shaft, and braking means for applying braking forces to the turbine shaft, characterized in that the supporting rollers are supported in a common bearing holder, said bearing holder being disposed between a rear wall of the housing chamber and the axial bearing means, said bearing holder being radially adjustable with respect to the axis of the turbine shaft, and characterized in that the common bearing holder is slidably mounted in bearing holder guides provided on a bearing support, said bearing support being connected to the housing chamber.

41. A mounting arrangement according to claim 40, characterized in that the bearing support is substantially U-shaped with the bearing holder disposed between its arms, the wedge gap means formed by the supporting rollers opening upwardly in the same direction as the U opens.

42. A mounting arrangement according to claim 41, characterized in that supporting roller bearing means are positioned in supporting roller guides in the bearing holder, said supporting roller guides being open in the direction of the open side of the U-shaped bearing support, and in that easily detachable means are provided for holding the supporting roller bearing means in place.

43. A mounting arrangement according to claim 40, characterized in that the turbine shaft is smooth over substantially its entire length, said turbine shaft having a diameter smaller than a bore provided in one arm of the bearing support adjacent the housing chamber.

44. A mounting arrangement according to claim 43, characterized in that a detachable end piece is provided for the end of the turbine shaft opposite the spinning turbine, said end piece being in the form of an insertion cone.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3877212 *Jan 22, 1973Apr 15, 1975Schubert & Salzer MaschinenApparatus for driving and supporting a spinning element
US3938312 *Sep 20, 1974Feb 17, 1976John Michael NogueraYarn spinning apparatus
US4041688 *Jul 29, 1975Aug 16, 1977Fritz StahleckerBearing means for spinning rotors of an open-end spinning machine
US4051654 *Aug 27, 1976Oct 4, 1977Skf Kugellagerfabriken GmbhOpen end spinning machine
US4070814 *Jun 7, 1976Jan 31, 1978Skf Kugellagerfabriken GmbhApparatus for arresting the rotor in an open-end spinning machine
US4167845 *Mar 7, 1978Sep 18, 1979Skf Kugellagerfabriken GmbhAxial guide for the shaft of a spinning rotor
US4183199 *Feb 16, 1978Jan 15, 1980Schubert & SalzerApparatus for bringing to rest the rotor of an open-end spinning device
US4184315 *Feb 16, 1978Jan 22, 1980Schubert & SalzerApparatus for supplying compressed air in arresting the rotor of an open end spinning device
US4402177 *Dec 16, 1981Sep 6, 1983Schubert & SalzerProcess and apparatus for stopping an open-end spinning apparatus
US4676673 *Jan 4, 1985Jun 30, 1987Fritz StahleckerBearing disk construction for supporting a spinning rotor shaft of an open-end spinning machine
US4713932 *Apr 14, 1987Dec 22, 1987Fritz StahleckerSupporting disk for a supporting-disk bearing of an open-end spinning machine
US4763469 *Jun 30, 1987Aug 16, 1988Fritz StahleckerOpen-end rotor spinning arrangement
US4785620 *Mar 1, 1988Nov 22, 1988Fritz StahleckerBearing and drive for a spinning rotor
US4916891 *Oct 12, 1988Apr 17, 1990Hans LandwehrkampOpen-end rotor spinning machine
US5222353 *Nov 27, 1991Jun 29, 1993Fritz StahleckerOpen-end spinning rotor
US5261221 *Aug 21, 1992Nov 16, 1993Fritz StahleckerOpen-end spinning rotor assembly
US5349809 *Aug 6, 1993Sep 27, 1994Stahlecker: HansShaft for an open-end spinning rotor assembly
US5426931 *Aug 6, 1993Jun 27, 1995Rieter Ingolstadt Spinnereimaschinenbau AgBearing setup for an open-end spinning rotor
US5551226 *Sep 1, 1995Sep 3, 1996Richard M. KeirDisk for open end spinning
US5592807 *May 16, 1995Jan 14, 1997Rieter Ingolstadt Spinnereimaschinenbau AgBearing arrangement for an open-end spinning rotor
US5603209 *May 25, 1995Feb 18, 1997Rieter Ingolstadt Spinnereimaschinenbau AgBearing arrangement for an open-end spinning rotor
US5964084 *Apr 27, 1998Oct 12, 1999W. Schlafhorst Ag & Co.Open-end spinning device
Classifications
U.S. Classification57/78, 57/88, 57/406, 57/105
International ClassificationD01H4/00, D01H4/12
Cooperative ClassificationD01H4/12
European ClassificationD01H4/12