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Publication numberUS3805788 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 23, 1974
Filing dateDec 20, 1972
Priority dateDec 20, 1972
Publication numberUS 3805788 A, US 3805788A, US-A-3805788, US3805788 A, US3805788A
InventorsKleiner J
Original AssigneeBristol Myers Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Aspirator jar
US 3805788 A
Abstract
An aspirated body fluid collection device comprising a transparent, graduated, cylindrical container having a flared mouth and a closure, which fits snugly within the mouth and which can be interlocked therewith, is disclosed. A pair of tubes are molded integrally with the closure to define openings which pass therethrough, one tube serving as an aspirated body fluid inlet and the other acting as a vacuum conduit. An antisplash deflector chute is attachable to the inner end of the inlet tube to direct fluid toward the side of the container, and provision is made for an inlet filter to strain solid matter from the body fluid before it reaches the graduated container. A small critical measure receptacle may be secured within the container when accurate measurement of small amounts of fluid are required. Float valve means may be connected to the inner end of the vacuum conduit to prevent withdrawal of fluid from the container after it is full.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Kleiner 1 Apr. 23, 1974 [73] Assignee: Bristol-Myers Company, New York,

22 Filed: Dec.20, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 317,048

[52] US. Cl 128/276, 215/41, 220/40 l28/DIG. 24; 220/40, 55.3, 42 B, 42 C, 97 C; 215/10, 47, 41, 51-52, 44

[56]" References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,661,862 12/1953 Howe 220/40 R 2,854,790 10/1958 Hartung 220/97 C 3,391,817 7/1968 Shaw 220/40 R 3,485,404 12/1969 Newton 215/41 3,620,408 11/1971 Holbrook et a1 215/41 3,646,935 3/1972 Holbrook et al..... 128/276 3,685,517 8/1972 Reynolds et al. 128/277 3,699,815 10/1972 Holbrook 128/276 3,743,131 7/1973 Croyle et al. 220/42 C Primary Examiner-Charles F. Rosenbaum Attorney, Agent, or Firm-James Magee, Jr.; Robert E. Havranek; Herbert W. Taylor, Jr.

[5 7] ABSTRACT An aspirated body fluid collection device comprising a transparent, graduated, cylindrical container having a flared mouth and a closure, which fits snugly within the mouth and which can be interlocked therewith, is disclosed. A pair of tubes are molded integrally with the closure to define openings which pass therea through, one tube serving as an aspirated body fluid inlet and the other acting as a vacuum conduit. An antisplash deflector chute is attachable to the inner end of the inlet tube to direct fluid toward the side of the container, and provision is made for an inlet filter to strain solid matter from the body fluid before it reaches the graduated container. A small critical measure receptacle may be secured within'the container when accurate measurement of small amounts of fluid are required. Float valve means may be connected to the inner end of the vacuum conduit to prevent withdrawal of fluid from the container after it is full.

The container closure includes a flared peripheral rim carrying on its outer surface a plurality of peripheral flexible ridges which engage the inner surface of the 30 Claims, 13 Drawing Figures PATENTEDAFR 23 29m SHEET 20F 5' ASPIRATOR JAR BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates, in general, to fluid collection jars, and more particularly to jars for receiving fluids from aspirators used in medical applications.

As is well-known during the course of a surgical operation on a patient, it is often necessary to remove from the site of the operation various body fluids, including blood, which tend to collect there. Removal of such body fluids is generally by means of an aspirator, which utilizes a vacuum to draw the fluids through a suitable tube for deposit in a collection bottle or jar. Body fluid storage bottles for use in such systems are well-known in the art, but have not been entirely satisfactory, since they have often been complex, difficult to assemble and use, expensive and often unreliable in operation.

In an aspirator system, a vacuum is produced in the fluid collection jar, thus creating a vacuum in the tube leading to the operation site from which fluids are to be withdrawn. This vacuum carries the fluid through a drainage tube to the inlet port of the bottle. Since it is important in many cases to be able to monitor the flow of such fluids, it is necessary to measure the amount accumulated in the aspirator jar with some degree of accuracy. For this purpose, the prior art has provided means for carrying this fluid to the bottom of the collection container, so that the inlet fluid does not splash and create a foam which would interfere with the volume measurements. However, such splash tubes have been found to create an additional problem, in that they can act as a syphon to carry aspirated fluids back to the operation site if the vacuum in the container is lost. Thus, the prior devices have to be carefully made to try to reduce the possibility of losing the vacuum and further means had to be provided toprevent this syphon action, if a vacuum loss should occur. The solutions to such problems have, in the past, resulted in an increased complexity for aspirator fluid collection containers, thus increasing their cost and reducing their reliability.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is, accordingly, an object of the present invention to provide a simple, reliable, and inexpensive aspirator jar which will overcome the problems encountered with prior art devices.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a simplified, easy to assemble, and easy to use, reliable aspirator jar.

.It is another object of the present invention to provide a simplified aspirator container which is made of molded plastic with a minimum number of parts, where the device is inexpensive, easy to assemble and -use, and thus is reliable and safe.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide an aspirator container which is capable of very accurate measurement of aspirated body fluids.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide an aspirator jar having a safe, air-tight construction, whereby accidental loss of vacuum is effectively prevented and which is so constructed that no syphoning action can take place if the vacuum should be lost.

It is another object of the present invention to proof the aspirator system when the fluid container jar is full, so that body fluids are not drawn into the vacuum source.

Briefly, the present invention comprises an aspirated body fluid collection jaw having a transparent, graduated, cylindrical container body portion formed with a flared upper edge, or mouth, which is adapted to receive a similarly flared closure. The flared peripheral edge of the closure is provided with peripheral ridges or ribs which are adapted to engage the mouth of the container to provide an airtight seal. Bayonet-type protrusions are provided around the outer edge of the closure to engage corresponding slots in the mouth of the container, whereby the closure is held firmly in place. This closure arrangement not onlyprovides an airtight seal for the container, but prevents accidental opening which could break the vacuum and interrupt the operation of the aspirator. Integrally molded as a part of the closure, or cover, are a pair of spaced tubular ports,

oneserving as an inlet for aspirated body fluids and adapted to be connected to a fluid drainage tube leading from a patient. The other tube acts as a vacuum conduit andit adapted to be connected to an external source of vacuum. Secured to the closure at the inner end of the inlet port and adapted to receive the aspirated fluid is a deflector chute, which causes the fluid flowing into the container to be deflectedagainst the sidewall of the container, to effectivelyprevent splashing and the resultant build-up of foam. A critical measure receptacle may be secured to the closure when it is desired to make accurate measurements of small amounts of fluid This receptacle is a small, graduated vessel arranged to receive the inlet fluid, and is connectable to the undersurface .of the closure in alignment with the inlet port. To prevent foaming, a deflector may be provided for the critical measure receptacle, or the receptacle may be designed to fit over the deflector chute provided for the main container.

An overflow opening'is providedin the sidewall of the receptacle near its top, through which the fluid may flow or be emptied into the larger container. If desired, a suitable filter may beplaced in the inlet tube to prevent the entry of solid matter into the container. A float valve mechanism is secured to the inner end of the vacuum conduit to insure that the body fluids drawn into the container cannot flow out through the vacuum line to the vacuum source. i

. The aspirator jar of the present invention preferably is molded from suitable plastic materials whereby a strong, lightweight, reliable, yet economic container is provided. This container meets the requirements of 7 present aspirator systems and overcomes the difficulties of prior containers of this type.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the container of the present invention with the closure lid removed;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary view of the locking slots illustrated in FIG. 2; r r

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of the container of FIG. 1, taken along lines 44 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged cross-sectional view of a portion of the flared edge of the container closure;

FIG. 6 is a bottom view of the container closure of FIG. 1, with the fluid deflector chute and exit port valve removed;

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view of the inlet port taken along 77 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional view of a fastener on the undersurface of the closure lid, taken along lines 8-8 of FIG. 6;

FIG. 9 is an exploded cross-sectional view of the outlet port valve assembly;

FIG. 10 is a perspective view of the deflector chute which may be secured to the inlet port of the closure;

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of a filter bag adapter which may be secured to the inlet port;

FIG. 12 is a top plan view of the critical measure container which may be secured to the closure in alignment with the inlet port; and

FIG. 13 is a sectional view of the critical measure container of FIG. 12, taken along lines 13-13.

DESCRIPTION OF A PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Turning now to a more detailed consideration of the drawings, there is illustrated at 10 in FIG. 1 a body fluid container for use with an aspirator and having a generally cylindrical body portion 12, an outwardly flared rim 14 forming the mouth of the container, and a closure 16 adapted to engage the mouth of the container and be lockably secured thereto. The container mouth is formed with three spaced apertures, 18, 19, and 20, which are adapted to receive corresponding locking tabs, 21, 22, and 23 in the form of bayonet-type protrusions around the periphery of an outwardly flared lip 24 which forms the outer circumference of the lid. The slope of the outer surface of lip 24 matches that of the inner surface of the flared rim 14 of the container, so that the inner surface of the rim and the outer surface of the lip will be in close engagement when the lid is secured on the container. Formed as a part of the lid 16 are two generally tubular ports, inlet port 26 adapted to be connected to a drainage tube (not shown), and outlet port 28, adapted to be attached to a source of vacuum.

Additional details of the aspirator jar of the present invention are illustrated in FIGS. 2, 3 and 4, FIG. 2 being a top plan view and FIG. 4 being a cross-sectional view of the device of FIG. 1 taken along the lines 4-4. As shown in those figures, the body portion 12 of the container includes a generally cylindrical wall 30, which preferably is tapered so that one container may be nested inside another for storage purposes. Thus, the wall 30 tapers inwardly from the mouth toward the bottom wall 32. A plurality of small projections or shoulders 34, 35, 36, and 37 are formed on the inner surface of the container wall 30, the shoulders being at a common height from the bottom of the container to define a stacking line. Thus, the shoulders of one container are adapted to receive the bottom of a container nested within it to prevent the inner nested container from becoming wedged in the outer container, thus assuring easy removal. The wall 30 is relatively thin, preferably about 0.10 inch in thickness, and may be molded from a styrene-containing polymer or other suitable plastic material.

The flared rim 14, which is molded as a part of the container body portion 12, joins the generally cylindrical wall 30 at an obtuse angle to form an annular shoulder 38 (FIGS. 2 and 4) on the inner surface of container body 12, at the upper edge of wall 30. The annular shoulder serves as a stop to prevent lid 16 from being depressed too far into the container.

As shown in FIG. 2, the sidewall 30 tapers upwardly and outwardly from the base 32 to the shoulder 38,

while the rim 14 flares outwardly and upwardly from the annular shoulder at an increased angle. The apertures 18, 19, and 20 formed in the rim l4'are of the bayonet-type, the opening 20 having an enlarged portion 40 (see FIG. 3) for receiving a corresponding tab 23 on the lid when the lid is pressed downwardly into the container mouth. The aperture has a circumferentially extended slot 42 which is adapted to receive tab 23 when the lid is pressed tightly downwardly and rotated in a clockwise direction as viewed in FIG. 2. R0- tation of the lid causes the tab to be cammed downwardly by the angled upper surface 44 of the aperture, thereby holding the lid securely in place. It will be apparent that the apertures 18 and 19 are similarly formed, and are spaced around the circumference of the container mouth to secure the lid and provide an airtight seal between the container enclosure and the rim 14.

The container closure 16 may be seen in FIG. 4 to be slightly dome-shaped, curving downwardly from a center point to a relatively low point adjacent its edge, the low point forming a depression or annular trough 46. Immediately outwardly of the trough area 46 the closure flares upwardly and outwardly to form the annular lip portion 24. Depending from the lower surface of the domed lid 16, approximately in the area of trough 46 is an annular skirt, or flange 48, which is adapted to fit within the container body portion defined by wall 30 and to be close to, but spaced from, the interior surface of that wall. The flange serves to locate the closure within the container and serves with the dome-shape of the lid to prevent possible inward collapse of the lid under external atmospheric pressure.

The manner in which closure 16 engages the rim 14 of the container body is illustrated in greater detail in the enlarged view of FIG. 5. As shown, the depending flange 48 is adapted to fit within the container wall 30, and extends to a point closely adjacent the interior surface of the wall. The outer surface of lip 24 is formed with a plurality of integrally molded ribs or ridges, which extend around the periphery of the lid, and which function as O-rings to provide an airtight seal between the lid and the container. Thus, the ribs 50, 51, and 52 are integrally molded with the lid and shaped to be sufficiently flexible as to firmly engage the inner surface of rim 14 when the lid has been locked into position by twisting and pressing downwardly so that the tabs 21, 22, and 23 are cammed into the reduced slot areas of their corresponding apertures l8, l9 and 20. The resiliency or ribs 50, 51 and 52 also serves to urge the lid upwardly and hold it tightly in place by pressing the tabs against the upper edges of their respective apertures. This positive locking arrangement provides a secure, connection between the closure and the container to prevent accidental loss of the negative pressure which is required within the container during its use.

Referring again to FIG. 4, it may be seen that the tubular inlet and outlet ports 26 and 28 are formed as an integral part of the closure structure, thereby eliminating the possibility of leaks in the system at the points where the inlet and outlet fittings pass into the container. The upper end 54 of inlet port 26 is elongated and slightly tapered to receive a tube, catheter or other conduit, leading, for example, from a patient from whom fluids are to be aspirated. The bore through the upper portion 54 is of generally constant diameter but expands to a greater diameter at shoulder portion 56 to provide an enlarged inlet chamber 58. The inlet chamber is also of constant diameter and extends through lid 16 to form the inlet opening 60. As may be seen both in FIG. 4 and FIG. 6, which is a bottom view of the lid, a groove 62 is formed in the undersurface of lid 16, the groove being concentric with the opening 60. In order to accommodate groove 62, the base of inlet port 26 is enlarged as at 64, thereby allowing the groove to be sufficiently deep to securely receive additional components of the container, such as deflector chute 65, to be described. FIGS. 6 and 7 illustrate the downwardly extending fastener prongs 66 and 68 which are used to secure such additional components as a deflector chute, a filter bag adapter, or both, to the undersurface of the lid, as will be described. Fastneers .66 and 68 each incorporate an enlarged shoulder portion, 70 and 72 respectively, which is adapted to be pressed through a corresponding opening in the deflector or the adapter, thereby to engage and secure these units. I

Also depending from the bottom surface of lid 16 is a second pair of spaced fastener prongs 74 and 76, which are provided to hold the critical measure unit, the fastener 74 being illustrated in greater detail in FIG. 8. As illustrated, each fastener prong comprises a pair of spaced, slightly divergent legs 78 and 79 which terminate in enlarged shoulder portions 80 and 81, respectively. The fastener legs are resilient to that they may be squeezed together and enlarged portions 80 and 81 pressed through a suitable aperture, the legs springing apart so that the shoulders grip the sides of the aperture to secure the measuring container to the lid.

Again referring to FIG. 4 it will be seen that the outlet port 28 comprises an upper elongatedtapered end portion 84 having an interior bore of constant diameter, the end portion 84 being adapted to receive suit able tubing or conduit means for connecting the port and thus the interior of container to a suitable vacuum source, (not shown). The bore through the upper portion 84 is enlarged at shoulder 86 to form an outlet chamber 88. This chamber is formed with a small cir cumferential ridge 90 adjacent its lower end andis adapted to receive and secure a valve, assembly 92, illustrated in greater detail in FIG. 9. As shown in FIGS. 4 and 9, the valve assembly 92 includes a filter housing 94, a valve housing 96 secured to the lower end of the filter housing, and a floating valve consisting of a float body 98 and a valve tip 100.

The filter housing 94 of the valve assembly has a generally cylindrical sidewall, defining an upper filter chamber 102 and a lower valve chamber 104. The upper and lower chambers are divided by a wall 106 having a central valve orifice 108 forming a passageway between the upper and lower chambers. Thispassageway is closeable by the valve tip 1'00 when the float valve is raised into contact with the dividing wall. The sides of the orifice 108 are tapered to match the taper of the valve tip 100 so that when the valve is closed by the insertion of the tip into the orifice there will be a maximum surface contact, thus insuring proper sealing action.

The outer surface of the filter housing 94 is formed with a small ridge, or detent, 110, which preferrably extends around the circumference of the housing and which is adapted to engage the corresponding ridge formed in the wall of the outlet chamber 88 of vacuum conduit 28. This detent allows the filter housing to be snapped into place in the vacuum conduit and held securely without the need for adhesives or other fastening means. The filter chamber 102 may carry a filter material of desired type and construction to insure that particulate matter is not drawn into the vacuum source.

The valve tip has an upper cone-shaped surface adapted to engage the orifice 108 and a lower body portion adapted to be secured in the cylindrical float body 98 by means of a suitable adhesive or solvent bonding material. The float body 98 is closed and forms an airtight float chamber 112 when the valve tip is secured in place. The valve housing 96 is of generally cylindrical form and is adapted to freely receive the float valve formed by float body 98 and valve 100. The bottom of the valve housing includes an orifice 114 through which fluids may enter the housing as the fluid level within the aspirator container 12 rises and approaches its maximum desired level. A-plurality of apertures 116, 117, and 118 are spaced around the upper end of the valve housing to provide a free flow of fluid through the housing. The housing is secured to the inner surface of the valve chamber portion 104 of the filter housing 94 by means of a suitable adhesive or solvent bonding. material, with the float valve then being free to rise and fall within the valve housing as the fluid level in the container changes.

Several auxiliary fluid receivers are provided for attachment to the undersurface of lid 16, and to receive fluids drawn into the aspirator container. As illustrated in FIG. 4, one such receiver is the deflector chute 65, which is so constructed that it can be secured to the closure 16 by means of the fasteners 66 and 68 described above. As shown in the perspective view of FIG. 10, the deflector chute comprises a generally cylindrical wall portion 120 which is adapted to engage the groove 62 formed in the undersurface of the lid 16. Wall 120 thus forms a continuation of the inlet port 26 and guides the fluid drawn into the container to a curved deflector portion 122, which is joined to the cylindrical wall portion 120 by means: of a flat upper wall 124. This upper flat wall 124 carries a pair of bayonettype apertures, only one of which is illustrated in FIG. 10 at 126. These apertures are provided on diametrically opposite sides of wall 120 and are adapted to re ceive the ends of the fastener prongs 66 and 68. Each aperture has an enlarged portion 128 which receives the fastener prongs and a smaller portion 130 which is smaller than the enlarged shoulders 70 and 72 of the fastener prongs, whereby the deflector chute may be pressed into place with the cylindrical wall 120 fitting into groove 62 and the fasteners 66*and 68 passing through the enlarged portion of their respective securing apertures. The deflector may then be rotated so that the shoulder portions 70 and 72 securely lock the of the curved deflector wall 122 will face the sidewall 30 of the container 12.

In some situations, it may be desirable to use a gauze filter bag in place of the deflector chute. For this purpose, the inlet port fluid-receiver may take the form of a bag adapter 132, as illustrated in FIG. 11. This adapter comprises a cylindrical upper wall portion 134 adapted to fit into the groove 62 formed in lid 16. Secured to the base of wall 134 is an annular disc-shaped wall 136 carrying two diametrically opposed securing apertures, one of which is illustrated at 138. This aperture is similar to the securing aperture 126 of the deflector chute 65, and the apertures are designed to engage the fastener prongs 66 and 68 in the manner described with respect to FIG. 10. Secured to the bottom of the disc 'shaped wall 136 so as to form a shoulder therewith is an outwardly extending collar 140 extending around the circumference of the adapter and designed to receive and secure the upper open end of a gauze bag. This adapter may be secured to the lower surface of lid 16, with the gauze bag filter secured to collar 140 and hanging downwardly into the container.

In some surgical procedures, it is important to know to a high degree of accuracy the amount of fluid being withdrawn from the site of the operation. For this purpose, the inlet port fluid receiver is an auxiliary critical measure receptacle 142, illustrated in a top plan view in FIG, 12 and in cross-section'in FIG. 13, the crosssection being taken along line 13-13 of FIG. 12. This receptacle is a generally cylindrical container adapted to fit inside the container 12 and to be secured to closure 16 to receive fluid from the inlet port. The receptacle 142 preferrably is graduated to permit an accurate measure of fluid, and incorporates an overflow outlet 143 so that it can be emptied into container 12 upon completion of the measurement without having to disassemble the aspirator jar.

As illustrated, the receptacle comprises an upper, annular, supporting flange 144 and a depending cylindrical receptacle body 145 secured thereto. The flange forms the mouth of the receptacle, and incorporates two diametrically opposed securing apertures 146 and 148 shaped to receive the fastener prongs 74 and 76 formed on the undersurface of closure 16 (see FIG. These apertues have an enlarged portion to receive the fasteners and a reduced area which engages the shoulder on the corresponding fastener prong when the receptacle is rotated, thus locking it in place. Flange 144 is also formed with a cutout 150 to accommodate the float valve assembly, so that the flange can be pressed against the undersurface of the closure to engage the fasteners and rotated to be locked in place without interfering with the valve assembly.

Toinsure that the receptacle receives all of the fluid discharged into the aspirator jar through the inlet port, the mouth of the receptacle forms a funnel, or spout, 152 at the upper edge of receptacle body 145. When the receptacle is secured to the closure 16, the funnel 152 extends under the inlet port 26 so that all of the incoming fluid is directed into the critical measure receptacle. When the measurement is complete, or when the receptacle is full, it may be emptied into the main container 12, or allowed to overflow into container 12, through the overflow outlet 143.

It will be apparent from the foregoing that to use the aspirator container of the present invention, it is merely necessary to secure a deflector chute or gauze bag adapter to the undersurface of the lid at the inlet port by pressing the selected item into the groove 62 so that the fastener prongs 66 and 68 extend through their corresponding apertures, and then twist the unit to lock it in place. Similarly, the preassembled float valve assembly 92 is snapped into place in the outlet port by pressing the filter housing 94 into the outlet chamber portion 88 of vacuum conduit 88. The lid assembly may then be securely fastened to the mouth of the container pressing downwardly and twisting clockwise to lock the tabs in place. The appropriate vacuum conduits and discharge tubes are secured to the outlet and inlet and the device is ready for operation.

Although the present invention has been described in terms of a specific embodiment thereof, it will be apparent to those of skill in the art that variations and modifications of the device may be made without departing from the true spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. An aspirator jar for receiving and holding fluids comprising: 7

a container having a closed bottom, a substantially cylindrical sidewall, and an open mouth portion defined by an annular, upwardly and outwardly flared rim formed at the top edge of said sidewall;

a closure for said container adapted to engage the inner surface of said rim;

sealing means located between said closure means and said rim for providing an airtight seal between said closure and said container;

locking means for securing said closure to said container;

a generally tubular inlet port in said closure for admitting fluid to the interior of said container; a deflector chute;

means for securing said deflector chute to said closure for receiving fluid entering said inlet port, and for-directing said fluid against said sidewall;

a generally tubular outlet port in said closure for use in withdrawing air from the interior of said container, whereby a negative pressure may be developed within the container; and

a valve assembly secured to said outlet port, said valve assembly including a valve orifice for restricting the flow of air out of said container, and a float valve responsive to the level of said fluid in said container for opening and closing said valve orifice.

2. The aspirator of claim 1, wherein said locking means comprises a plurality of tabs spaced around the circumference of said closure and a plurality of corresponding apertures formed in said rim and adapted to receive said tabs. 2

3. The aspirator jar of claim 2, wherein said locking means is of the bayonet type, whereby rotation of said closure with respect to said container locks said tabs into said apertures to secure said closure.

4. The aspirator jar of claim 3, wherein said sealing means comprises at least one sealing ring.

5. The aspirator of claim 3, wherein said sealing means comprises a plurality of parallel sealing ribs formed integrally with and extending around the circumference of said closure and adapted to sealingly engage the inner surface of said rim when said closure is locked to said container.

6. The aspirator jar of claim 1, wherein said sealing means comprises a pluraltiy of sealing ribs formed around the circumference of said closure and adapted to sealingly engage the inner surface of said rim when said closure is secured to said container.

7. The aspirator jar of claim 6, wherein saidsealing ribs comprise at least two parallel ribs molded on the exterior edge of and extending around the circumference of said closure to seal said closure to said container.

8. The aspirator jar of claim 1, wherein said closure comprises a disc having an upwardly flared circumferential lip adapted to engage said rim, the slope of said flared lip substantially matching the slope of said flared rim, whereby said closure engages said rim over a substantial surface area.

9. The aspirator jar of claim 8, wherein said sealing means comprises a plurality of sealing ribs on said flared lip to sealingly contact said flared rim.

10. The aspirator jar of claim 9, wherein said locking means comprises a plurality of tabs spaced around the circumference of said closure lip and a plurality of corresponding locking apertures formed in said rim and adapted to receive said tabs.

. 11. The aspirator jar of claim 10, wherein said locking apertures are of the bayonet-type, rotation of said closure with respect to said container locking said tabs into said apertures to secure said closure and to compress said sealing ribs between said lip and said rim, thereby sealing said container.

12. The aspirator jar of claim 8, wherein said closure disc is dome-shaped.

13. The aspirator jar of claim 12, wherein said closure disc further includes an annular flange depending therefrom and extending into and closely adjacent the sidewall of said container. i

14. The aspirator jar of claim 1, wherein said deflector chute comprises an upper conduit portion connectable to said inlet port and a lower deflector wall formed at an angle with respect to said conduit portion to de' flect said entering fluid.

15. The aspirator jar of claim 14, wherein said means for securing said deflector chute to said closure comprises a fastener means on said closureand corresponding aperture means on said deflector chutefor receiving.

said fastener means. 1

16. The aspirator jar of claim 14, wherein said means for securing said deflector chute to said closure comprises an annular groove in the undersurface of said closure, said groove being substantially coaxial with said inlet port and adapted to receive said upper conduit portion of said deflector chute.

17. The aspirator jar of claim 16 wherein said means for securing said deflector chute to said closure further comprises fastener prongs formed on said closure adja cent said groove, and corresponding apertures on said deflector chute adjacent said upper conduit portion for receiving said fastener prongs.

18. The aspirator jar of claim 1 wherein said outlet port defines an outlet chamber, said valve assembly further including a filter housing adapted to be secured in said outlet chamber and a valve housing secured to said filter housing, said float valve being carried within said valve housing.

19. The aspirator jar of claim 18, wherein said filter 5 housing includes a bottom wall separating said outlet port from said valve housing, said bottom wall includmg locking means for securing said closure to said container; a generally tubular inlet port in said closure for admitting fluid to the interior of said container; a generally tubular outlet port in. said closure for use in withdrawing air from the interior of said container, whereby a negative pressure may be developed within the container; a valve assembly secured to said outlet port, said valve assembly including a valve orifice for restricting the flow of air out of said container, and a float valve responsive to the level of said fluid in said container for opening and closing said valve orifice; auxiliary inlet port fluid receiving means; and fastener means on the undersurface of said closure for receiving and securing to said closure in align ment a centrally located opening which constitute said valve orifice. v I v 20. The aspirator jar of claim 19, wherein said valve housing is secured to said filter housing to align said float valve with said orifice. V

21. An aspirator jar for receiving and holding fluids, comprising; l

a container having a closed bottom, a substantially cylindrical side wall, and an open mouth portion 5 defined by an annular, upwardly and outwardly flared rim formedat the top edge of said sidewall;

a closure for said container adapted to engage the inner surface of said rim;

sealing means located between said closure means and said rim for providing an airtight seal between said closure and said container;

locking means for securing said closure to said container;

an inlet port in said closure for admitting fluid to the interior of said container;

auxiliary fluid receiving means;

fastener means for securing said auxiliary receiving means within said container and in alignment with said inlet port for initially receiving fluid admitted to the interior of said container; and

a generally tubular outlet port in saidclosure for use in withdrawing air from the interior of said container, whereby a negative pressure may be developed within the container. g fii'fh aspirator jar of claim 21, wherein said auxiliary fluid receiving means comprises a deflector chute having an upper conduit portion connectable to said 60 inlet port and a lower deflector wall formed at an angle with respect to said conduit portion to deflect said entering fluid toward said container sidewall.

23. The aspirator jar of claim 21, whereinsaid auxiliary fluid receiving means comprises an adapter for securing a filter to said inlet port.

24. The aspirator jar of claim 21, wherein said auxiliary fluid receiving means comprises a critical measure unit. i

25. The aspirator jar of claim 24, wherein said critical measure unit comprises a generally cylindrical receptacle having funnel means for receiving fluid from said inlet port and means cooperating with said fastener means to position said funnel means adjacent said inlet port.

26. The aspirator jar of claim 25, wherein said receptacle includes an overflow outlet to permit fluid to flow out-of said receptacle in said container.

27. The aspirator jar of claim 26, wherein said fastener means for said receptacle includes a pair of spaced fastener prongs on the undersurface of said closure.

28. The aspirator jar of claim 27, wherein said outlet port defines an outlet chamber, said valve assembly further including a filter housing adapted to be secured in said outlet chamber, and a valve housing secured to said filter housing, said float valve being carried within said valve housing.

29. The aspirator jar of claim 28, wherein said closure comprises a disc having an upwardly flared circumferential lip adapted to engage said rim, the slope of said flared lip substantially matching the slope of said flared rim, whereby said closure engages said rim over a substantial surface area.

30. The aspirator jar of claim 29, wherein said sealing means comprises a plurality of sealing ribs on said flared lip to sealingly contact said flared rim,

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US3743131 *Jun 22, 1970Jul 3, 1973Dart Ind IncClosure for open-mouthed containers or tubular vessels
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3965903 *May 23, 1975Jun 29, 1976Chemetron CorporationSuction bottle assembly
US4013076 *Oct 24, 1975Mar 22, 1977Diemolding CorporationAspirator jar
US4051971 *Nov 3, 1975Oct 4, 1977Piergiorgio SaleriHome use seal container for food vacuum storage
US4059113 *Sep 29, 1975Nov 22, 1977Dieter BeinsenAspirators for medical purposes
US4245637 *Jul 10, 1978Jan 20, 1981Nichols Robert LShutoff valve sleeve
US4256109 *Jul 10, 1978Mar 17, 1981Nichols Robert LShut off valve for medical suction apparatus
US4275731 *Jul 10, 1978Jun 30, 1981Nichols Robert LSuction canister with vortex flow deflector
US4321923 *Jan 31, 1980Mar 30, 1982Nichols Robert LLow profile shut-off valve for medical suction apparatus
US4334630 *Jan 26, 1981Jun 15, 1982Bergin Paul FHatch cover
US4515283 *Nov 15, 1982May 7, 1985Hiro SuzukiAspirator apparatus
US5722964 *Jun 7, 1995Mar 3, 1998Atrium Medical CorporationFiltered blood collection device
EP0205614A1 *Oct 24, 1985Dec 30, 1986Stryker CorpWound drainage system having a lipids blocking baffle.
EP1506120A1 *Apr 18, 2003Feb 16, 2005Tilia International, Inc.Hose direct canister lid
WO2007028987A2 *Sep 6, 2006Mar 15, 2007Gwernafalau CyfyngedigA closure with inlet and outlet ports, a vessel with integrated mixing balls, and a method for separating material from a sample
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/320, 215/309, 220/300
International ClassificationA61M1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M1/0049, A61M1/0001
European ClassificationA61M1/00A, A61M1/00H12