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Publication numberUS3805815 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 23, 1974
Filing dateJan 15, 1973
Priority dateJan 15, 1973
Publication numberUS 3805815 A, US 3805815A, US-A-3805815, US3805815 A, US3805815A
InventorsGoodin R
Original AssigneeGoodin R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pool cleaning apparatus
US 3805815 A
Abstract
A sweep head consists of a large inverted cup which is supplied with water under pressure through a hose, and with aerated water through another hose. Several sweeper hoses attached to the head emit streams of water under pressure. The sweep head contains mechanism for moving it and its sweeper hoses horizontally throughout the pool, and another mechanism for moving the head and hoses vertically in the water of the pool. Two embodiments for horizontal motion, and three embodiments for vertical motion, are described.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Goodin A r. 23 1974 [54] POOL CLEANING APPARATUS 3,765,432 10/1973 Goodin 134/168 R V [76] Inventor: Raymon L. Goodin, 2227 W.

Overton Rd. Box 673, Tucson, Ariz. y Examiner-"Robert Bleiutge 85704 Attorney, Agent, or Firm-James A. Eyster [22] Filed: Jan. 15, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 323,849 [57] ABSTRACT A sweep head consists of a large inverted cup which is supplied with water under pressure through a hose, 2 3 g and with aerated water through another hose. Several i 102 1 R 168R sweeper hoses attached to the head emit streams of I m 0 ea c 4/172 15 172 water under pressure. The sweep head contains mechanism for moving it and its sweeper hoses horizontally throughout the pool, and another mechanism for mov- [56] References Cited ing the head and hoses vertically in the water of the UNITED STATES PATENTS pool. Two embodiments for horizontal motion, and 2,241,337 5/1941 Work 134/94 UX three embodiments for vertical motion, are described. 3,170,180 2/1965. Winston et al.. 134/167 R X 3,575,729 4/1971 Howard 15/1.7 X

5 Claims, 12 Drawing Figures mgmgmma 1974 f 3.805.815 SHEET 1 OF 4 POOL CLEANING APPARATUS C ROSS-REFERENCES TO RELATED APPLICATION This invention is related to that described in my patentapplicationSer.No. 125,284., filed Mar. 17, 1971, now US. Pat. No. 3,765,432.

BAC KGRGUND OF THE INVENTION movingthe sweeper hoses up anddown within the pool.

water, and atthe same time moving the sweeper hoses lhorizontally.

The present invention provides improved means for thus moving the sweeper hosesvertically and horizontally.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The pool-cleaning apparatus of this invention is primarily intendedfor use in a swimming pool; the apparatus is provided with pressurized water and aerated wa- %ter. The pressurized water is fed tov a sweeper head and through it to sweeper hoses, emitting high pressure water jets. Aerated water andpressurized water are fed tothe sweep head foraproducinghorizontal and vertical motions of the sweep head and the connected sweep hoses.

The horizontal motion is caused by a small jet of pressurized water emitted horizontally by the sweep head, the direction of this jet being changed by asmall amount, for example 30, every time the sweep head .and sweeper hoses complete a vertical motion cycle.

This invention has three embodiments providing three means of effecting vertical motion of the sweep head.

The first embodiment provides an inverted cup :hinged within the sweep head case and supplied from below with aerated water. When a certain amount of air has accumulated in the inverted cup, making it buoyant, it rotates upward, discharging its air into the .top of the cavity of the sweep head. I n doing so, afinger :secured to therim of the cup hits a spoke of a l2-spoke wheel, turning it one-twelfth revolution. The hub of this w heel contains asmall pressurized water jet, so that the rotationof'the wheel changes the direction of the jet. The reaction of this jet moves'the sweep head horizontally.

The sweep head is provided at its top with a small pipe, adjustably projecting through the top of the sweep head case. When the accumulated air reaches the bottom of this pipe, the air escapes. The amount by "which the pipe projects downward inside the case therefore determines the depth at which the sweep head operates.

The second embodiment also providesthe l2-spoke wheel with the small pressurized jet in its hub. An inverted U-shaped lever, pivoted in the'case,carries a fingerat one endpositioned tomove the wheel. The other end of the leverprojects below the rim of the case so that every time the sweep head settlesto the bottom of the pool the wheel is rotated one-twelfth revolution, and every time the sweep head leaves thebottom of the pool the finger is reset.

The second embodiment also provides buoyant means within the sweep head, in this embodiment consisting of afloatwithin the case. The embodiment also provides a jet of pressurized water and an air-release pipe in the top of the case controlled by a vent valve connected to a lever. The case is also provided with an aerated water intake pipe.

In operation, with only a smallamount of air in the case andthe sweep head on the bottom of the pool, the float pulls an angled lever into such a position that the pressurized water jet in the case hits the valve lever,

closing the vent valve. Thereafterwater accumulates in the case and the sweep head becomes buoyant and rises. As air accumulates inthe case, the float is lowered, moving the angled lever and causing the valve lever to move out of the water jet, causing the vent valve to open, releasing the air and causing the sweep head again to settle to the bottom of the pool.

The third embodiment provides the same means for horizontal movement as does the second embodiment.

For vertical movement the third embodiment provides a floatoutside the top of the case, connected to a first lever. The embodiment also provides an upright cup secured to the sweep head case and provided with a valve in its bottom, the valve being operated by the first lever. The cup contains a float. The case is provided in its top with an air vent pipe which is closed at its lower end by a vent valve. This valve is opened and closed by a second lever so positioned as to be moved up and down by the float. The case is provided with an aerated-water intake pipe.

In operation, with the sweep head on the bottom of the pool, and only a small amount of air in the case, the external float is up, closing the cup valve; the cupfloat is -up, closing the air vent valve. As air accumulates in the case it becomes buoyant and rises to the surface of the water. The external float drops, opening the cup valve. The cup float is lowered because the water/air level is well below the rim of the cup. This opens the air vent valve, discharging the air, and the sweep head drops to the floor of the pool.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. -'1 is an elevation view of the sweeper head of the first embodiment.

FIG. 2 is an elevation view of the sweeper head of the first embodiment, sectioned on the line 2-2, FIG. 3.

FIG. 3 is a bottom view of the first embodiment FIG. 10 is a plan view of the slat of the second embodiment.

FIG. 11 is an edge view of the slat.

FIG. 12 is a side view, partly in section, of the sweeper head of the third embodiment.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS A preferred embodiment is shown in FIGS. 1 to 7, illustrating a sweeper head assembly, comprising an open-bottomed case 11 with rolled edge 12 and 17, passing through its top. Except for this tube, provided with a skeletomzed frame 18 to provide support for mechanism inside the case.

This mechanism includes a bell-shaped inverted cup 19 hinged at 20 to one end of an L-shaped supporting bar 21. The other end of bar 21 is secured to frame 18. This cup 19 is seen more clearly in FIG. 4, showing by full lines its inverted position and in its hinged upward, or dumping, position 19 by dotted lines.

A hose nipple, 22, is provided in a block 23 secured to the frame 18, and holes are drilled in the block and frame. This nipple 22 is provided for attachment to a hose supplying water mixed with air. The holes permit this air/water mixture to flow upward and into the inverted cup 19.

The inverted cup 19 is provided with a hinged finger 24, more clearly shown in FIGS. and 6. The finger 24 is hinged at 25 in a bracket 26 secured to the lip of the inverted cup 19.

A pipe fitting assembly, secured to the case 11, comprises tees-27 and 28, FIG. 1, connected by a nipple 29. A hose nipple 31 is provided for connection to a hose supplying high-pressure water. A distribution fitting 32 is connected to tee 27 for supplying water to four hoses nipples 33, 34, 36, and 37, for attachment to four sweeper hoses. This distribution fitting 32 and the hoses are shown more clearly in FIG. 7. An adjustable valve 38 is inserted in tee 27 for regulating water flow to the distribution'fitting 32. The pipe fitting assembly and distribution fitting 32 comprise parts of the sweeper head assembly 10.

Tee 28 is connected to a long pipe nipple 39 terminating in an elbow 41. This elbow 41 is fitted with a journal for the rotation therein of a hollow bearing 43. This bearing is secured to a l2-vane wheel 44. The hub of wheel 44 is an extension of the bearing 43, and is provided, below the wheel 44, with an exit hole or nozzle 46 which communicates with theinterior of bearing 43 and of the pipe 39. Thus pressure water provided at hose nipple 31 is supplied through pipe 39 and hollow bearing 43 to the nozzle 46.

FIG. 8 schematically depicts pool cleaning equipment required for use with the sweeper head of this invention. A swimming pool 47 contained within the periphery of coping 48 is provided with a motor 49 and water pump 51 supplied through filter tank 52 with water sucked from the pool bottom at grating 53. The pump 51 output is supplied to the sweeper head 10 through flexible hose 54, and enters hose nipple 31, FIG. 1, flowing through tee 28, nipple 29, tee 27 and distribution fitting 32 to the four sweeper hose nipples, 33, 34, 36, and 37. These nipples are respectively connccted to four sweeper hoses, 55, 56, 57, and 58 for emission, from their free ends, of high-pressure sweeper water.

High pressure water is also fed from water pump 51 to an aerating valve 59, where air is sucked in, and the air/water mixture is fed through a flexible hose 61 to the hose nipple 22, FIG. 4, from which it passes through the hollow block 23 and the hole in frame 18, directed upward to the inverted cup 19.

In operation of the sweeper head 10 and of the entire pool cleaning apparatus, the head 10 is positioned on the bottom of the pool, on the surface of the water, or at any intermediate depth, the depth being controlled by the amount by which the tube 17 projects into the interior of the case 11, in a manner which will be explained.

The pressure water flows to the four sweeper hoses 55, 56, 57, and 58, which writhe over the pool bottom, or walls, or through the body and surface of the pool water, thus keeping the water in agitation and dislodging dirt particles from the bottom and walls.

The pressure water also flows from the exit hole or nozzle 46, FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, with such force as to propel the sweeper head 10 in a direction opposite to the direction of the jet from the nozzle 46. Thus the sweeper head assembly 10 is continuously moved in an approximately horizontal plane.

The air/water mixture flows from flexible hose 61 to the hose nipple 22, FIG. 4, and discharges inside the sweeper head case 11 in an upward direction, into the inverted cup 19. There the air collects at the top of the inverted cup 19 while the water is displaced downward and out of the cup. Finally, such an amount of air is collected in the inverted cup that it becomes buoyant and unstable, and rotates around its hinge 20 on the supporting bar 21, and the cup assumes its dotted line position 19', FIG. 4. This spills all of its air into the top of the case 11, and the cup returns by gravity to its inverted position shown by the solid lines in FIG. 4.

The inverted cup, in turning upward, moves its finger 24 against a vane of the l2-vane wheel 44, rotating the wheel one-twelfth revolution. When the cup again turns downward its finger 24, being hinged at 25, does not disturb the position of wheel 44.

When the air accumulated in the top of case 11 reaches the level of the bottom of tube 17, any additional air escapes through this tube. Thus the level of the bottom end of the adjustable tube 17 determines the amount of air which can accumulate inthe case, in

turn determining the buoyancy of the case, which determines whether the sweeper head position is at the bottom of the pool, on the water surface, or at some definite intermediate depth. This intermediate depth, although definite on the average, varies up and down within a few inches during the filling part of the cycle of operation of the inverted cup 19.

A second embodiment of the sweeper head assembly is shown in FIG. 9. The mechanism for'moving the sweeper head assembly vertically is divorced from the horizontal motion mechanism. The latter comprises the l2-vane wheel 44 fed with pressurized water through pipe 71. An donating finger M is hinge d to one end of a support lever 72 which is pivoted to a frame member, 73, supported by a frame 74 secured to case 11. The lever 72 is terminated at its other end in a ball 76. This ball is below the plane of the case edge 77.

The mechanism for vertical motion of the sweeper head comprises an air/water intake 78, an air vent valve 79, a pressurized water nozzle 81 and a buoyant element 82. The latter is connected by a cord 83 to a lever 84 having an angled extension 86. The lever and its extension are hinged in a frame extension 87. The lever is weighted at its end by a weight 88.

The movable part of valve 79 consists of a washer 89 on the end of a lever 91 pivoted in the pillar 92 secured to the case 11. The lever 91 extends to meet the lever extension 86', the place of meeting being in a sliding slat 93 secured to the lever 91. The construction of slat 93 is shown more clearly in FIGS. and 11. The slat 93 is slidingly secured to lever 91 by two screws 94 and 96 loosely confined in two slots, 97 and 98, in the slat 93. The angled extension 86 is inserted, through a large window, 99, in lever 91, into an aperture, 101, in the slat 93. 1

Thus the angled extension 86, as it moves, impels slat 93 to slide forward and back relative to the lever 91.

A pipe fitting assembly as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, including the distribution fitting 32, associated sweeper hoses, and the elements shown in FIG. 8, are part of the second embodiment, with elements and action as described in connection with the first embodiment but not shown in the figures of the second embodiment.

Although no weight is illustrated at the rim 77, it is assumed to be present, with depiction, description, function and operation as in the first embodiment.

The sweep head is supported on the floor of the pool, except for partial support on the lever ball 76, by three short, equal legs 100, two of which are shown in FIG. 9

In the operation of the second embodiment, the pool sweep head assembly moves vertically between the floor of the pool and a level, below the surface, determined by adjustment.

The horizontal movement is effected by reaction to the pressured water jet from aperture 46, FIG. 9. The rotational motion of the l2-vane wheel 44 is effected as follows:

When the case 11 moves downward toward the floor of the pool, the ball 76 hits the floor first, as it projects below rim 77, and moves the end of lever attached to finger 24 sideways. As described in connection with the first embodiment, the finger advances wheel 44 by onetwelfth revolution. When the sweep head rises from the floor the finger 24 is reset by gravity.

The vertical motion of the sweep head is effected as follows: assuming the sweep head is on the bottom of the pool, pressured water enters at 71 and aerated water at 78. There is some air in the top of the case, but not enough to reach the buoyant element or float 82. This float is buoyant enough to pull the lever 84 upward, against the pull of gravity on weight 88. The lever extension 86 has moved the slat 93 to its furthest right position, into the stream of pressurized water from nozale 8]. This water stream impels lever 91 to its furthest up position, closing valve 79, sealing the case against air loss. As air from intake 78 slowly accumulates in the top of the case the sweep head becomes buoyant and rises. The air/water boundary becomes lower, finally reaching the float 82, which goes lower. The distance above the pool floor at which this occurs depends on the length of thefloat cord 83 and the mass of weight 88. As the float 82 drops, the weight 88 moves lever 86 to the left. This moves slat93 to its furthest left position, out of the jet from nozzle 81, opening valve 79, allowing air to escape from the exhaust pipe 102, and the sweep head falls to the bottom of the pool. Now air again accumulates in the sweep head case and the operating cycle repeats.

A third embodiment is shown in FIG. 12. The mechanism for horizontal motion is identical with that of the second embodiment.

The pipe fitting assembly and sweep hoses are as shown in FIGS. 1 and 8, therefore are not shown again.

The case and its weight 15 may be as shown in connection with the first embodiment, hence are not shown or described in detail again.

The third embodiment comprises a case 11 containing a frame 111 secured to the case. An air vent pipe 112 extends through the roof of the case and is closed at its lower end by a valve 113. A lever fulcrumed at 116 in the pipe support 117, secured to case 11, bears a knob 118 at its lower end. An upright cup 119 is secured to frame 111 and has a valve 121 in its floor closed by a washer 122. The "cup 119 contains a float 123 having a cylindrical diameter slightly smaller than the cylindrical internal diameter of cup 119. The valve washer 122 is carried by one end of a lever 124 fulcrumed at 126 in the frame 111. A tube 127 extends from above case 11 to a point near the level of the floor of cup 119. A float 128 is connected by a cord or rod 129 to the other end of lever 124 and to a weight 131 carried by the lever. Aerated water flows into case 11 through pipe 78.

In the operation of this third embodiment, assume that the sweep head rests on the bottom of the pool and that only a small amount of air is in the top of the case, so that the air/water level line inside the case is above the edge of cup 119. The float 128 is at its uppermost position, raising weight 131 and closing valve 121 Cup 119 is full of water and float 123 is up and pressing against knob 118, which action closes valve 113, allowing no air to escape. Aerated water enters at pipe 78 and the air therein accumulates in. the top of case 11.

Eventually the sweep head becomes buoyant and rises to the surface of the pool, and its top emerges from the water. The water level inside the case at this time is well below the top surface of float 123. The float 128 falls, as it is above the pool water surface, releasing lever 124 and opening valve 121. Water then flows from cup 119 through valve 121 until the level inside the cup is the same as outside the cup. Float 123 consequently falls, releasing lever 114 and opening valve 113. This allows air trapped in case 11 to escape until the sweep head loses its buoyancy and falls. But as soon as float 123 is submerged it becomes buoyant and closes valve 121. As the sweep head falls further the air in the case, being exposed to the hydrostatic pressure of the pool water, is compressed, so that the air/water level in the case rises until the water flows over the edge of cup 119, filling the cup with water. The float 123 rises, pushing knob 118 up and closing valve 113. The sweep head continues to fall until it rests on the bottom of the pool and the cycle repeats.

What is claimed is:

1. A pool cleaning apparatus for operation in a swimming pool which comprises:

a sweep head having a cavity therein surrounded by a case having an open bottom, having an air vent in the top thereof, and, except for said open bottom and said air vent, being water tight, and having attached thereto a plurality of sweeper hoses; buoyant means associated with said sweeper head;

a supply hose for supplying pressurized water to said sweeper hoses;

first means for supplying aerated water to the interior of said sweeper head;

second means controlled by said buoyant means controlling the vertical movement of said sweeper head between the pool bottom and a higher level; and

third means for moving sweeper head and associated sweep hoses horizontally in a selected non-random direction, said selected direction being changed by a definite selected angle each time that the sweep head passed through a cycle of vertical motion.

2. A pool cleaning apparatus in accordance with claim 1 in which said third means comprises:

a spoked, rotatable wheel lying below the bottom of said sweep head in an approximately horizontal plane;

an approximately horizontal nozzle in said wheel;

a pipe conveying pressurized water from said supply hose to said horizontal nozzle whereby a water jet issues from the'horizontal nozzle and the reaction of the water jet moves said sweep head approximately horizontally;

a movable finger positioned between two of the spokes of said spoked wheel, whereby movement of said finger rotates said wheel including said horizontal nozzle therein, changing the direction of said water jet; and

means controlling said movable finger.

3. A pool cleaning apparatus in accordance with claim 2 comprising:

an inverted cup in said sweep head and rotatably secured to the case thereof, said cup when containing air constituting said buoyant means;

a nozzle under said cup and directed therein;

pipe and hose means supplying aerated water to said nozzle, said nozzle, pipe and hose means constituting said first means;

an adjustable pipe extending through the top of said case, said air vent, adjustable pipe, buoyant means and first means constituting said second means; and

means securing said movable finger to the rim of said inverted cup, whereby said cup comprises said means controlling the movable finger.

4. A pool cleaning apparatus in accordance with claim 2 comprising:

a pipe extending through the top of said case, constituting said air vent;

a valve at the bottom end of said pipe controlling the escape of air from said cavity into the pipe;

buoyant means comprising a mass of buoyant material positioned within said cavity;

a pressurized water nozzle pointing upward and supplied from said supply hose;

a longitudinally movable slat positioned adjacent to said pressurized water nozzle;

a first lever fulcrumed in said case, one end thereof being connected to said mass and being movable thereby;

a second lever fulcrumed in said case, one end thereof being slidingly secured to said slat and the other end thereof being secured to said valve for the operation thereof;

means connecting the other end of said first lever to said slat, whereby lever movement slides said slat into and out of the up-moving jet from said pressurized water nozzle;

a third lever fulcrumed in said case having one end extending below the rim of said sweep head and having the other end pivoted to said finger, whereby as the sweep head settles on the pool bottom said third lever operates the finger, in turn moving said wheel, said third lever comprising said third means.

5. A pool cleaning apparatus in accordance with claim 2 comprising:

a pipe extending through the top of said case, constituting said air vent;

a valve at the bottom end of said pipe controlling the escape of air from said cavity into the pipe;

buoyant means comprising first buoyant means inside said sweep head and second buoyant means outside the sweep head;

an upright cup within the cavity of said sweep head and secured to said case;

a loose buoyant first mass within said upright cup capable of unimpeded vertical motion constituting said first buoyant means;

a buoyant second mass outside said sweep head constituting said second buoyant means;

a first valve controlling an opening in the bottom of said cup;

a fourth lever fulcrumed in said case and having one end connected to said valve for the control thereof;

bottom end of the pipe for operation thereof; and I a third lever fulcrumed in said case having one end extending below the rim of said sweep head and having the other end pivoted to said finger, whereby as the sweep head settles on the pool bottom said third lever operates the finger, in turn moving said wheel, said third lever comprising said third means.

Patent Citations
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US3575729 *Aug 21, 1969Apr 20, 1971Blue Haven Pools IncAutomatically extensible and retractable suction and scouring action pool cleaner
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4195371 *Sep 5, 1978Apr 1, 1980Goodin Raymon LPool cleaning apparatus
US4640783 *Jun 10, 1985Feb 3, 1987Kern Donald WOzone injection method and apparatus
US4746424 *Nov 3, 1986May 24, 1988Drew Richard HFloating swimming pool skimmer
US4837886 *Oct 2, 1987Jun 13, 1989David RawlinsPool cleaning device
US4966717 *Feb 10, 1989Oct 30, 1990Kern Donald WDisinfecting of swimming pool
US5226205 *Sep 11, 1991Jul 13, 1993Fred International C.V.Hydraulic machine
US5985156 *Dec 25, 1997Nov 16, 1999Henkin; Melvyn L.Unitary body through which water to be cleaned flows is selectively positioned to rest at the pool bottom or water surface as controlled by propulsion subsystem
US6039886 *Dec 26, 1997Mar 21, 2000Henkin; Melvyn L.Water suction powered automatic swimming pool cleaning system
US6090219 *Dec 26, 1997Jul 18, 2000Henkin; Melvyn L.Unitary cleaner body including water flow propulsion system and a level control subsystem for selectively locating the cleaner either on the pool water surface or along the pool floor/wall surface
US7501056Nov 18, 2005Mar 10, 2009Henkin-Laby, LlcPositive pressure pool cleaner propulsion subsystem
US8307485Aug 19, 2011Nov 13, 2012Hayward Industries, Inc.Apparatus for facilitating maintenance of a pool cleaning device
US8343339Sep 16, 2008Jan 1, 2013Hayward Industries, Inc.Apparatus for facilitating maintenance of a pool cleaning device
US8784652Sep 24, 2010Jul 22, 2014PoolvergnuegenSwimming pool cleaner with a rigid debris canister
EP1695770A1 *May 6, 1997Aug 30, 2006Melvyn L. HenkinPositive pressure automatic swimming pool cleaning system
WO1997049504A1 *May 6, 1997Dec 31, 1997Henkin Melvyn LanePositive pressure automatic swimming pool cleaning system
WO1999033582A1 *Dec 23, 1998Jul 8, 1999Henkin Melvyn LanePositive pressure automatic swimming pool cleaning system
Classifications
U.S. Classification134/167.00R, 15/1.7, 4/490
International ClassificationE04H4/00, E04H4/16
Cooperative ClassificationE04H4/1681
European ClassificationE04H4/16D