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Publication numberUS3806873 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 23, 1974
Filing dateAug 2, 1972
Priority dateJan 12, 1972
Publication numberUS 3806873 A, US 3806873A, US-A-3806873, US3806873 A, US3806873A
InventorsBrady W
Original AssigneeBrady W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Time perspective audio-video translator
US 3806873 A
Abstract
An audio-to-video translating system comprising: a selective frequency filter for separating an audio input signal into a plurality of separate control signals having frequencies falling within a given range; a light array associated with each control signal; an electrical circuit connecting each of the control signals with a respective one of the light arrays for initiating production of light substantially simultaneously with the onset of the associated control signal; and time shift means associated with the electrical circuit for sequentially and spatially displacing light produced in each of the light arrays for visually representing the duration of the control signal. The time shift means may comprise a second electrical circuit associated with each of the light arrays, connected to the first electrical circuit and actuatable at the onset of its respective associated control signal to provide timed pulses to a third electrical circuit for sequentially supplying signals to a plurality of lights in the associated light array for said sequential spatial displacement of light.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[ 1 Apr. 23, 1974 TIME PERSPECTIVE AUDIO-VIDEO TRANSLATOR [76] Inventor: William M. Brady, 225 Skyview Dr.

E., Austin, Tex. 78228 [22] Filed: Aug. 2, 1972 [21] App]. No.: 277,320

Related US. Application Data [63] Continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 217,186, Jan. 12,

.5 Q :5: m "15" I Primary Examiner--Harold l. Pitts Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Ralph R. Browning 5 7 ABSTRACT An audio-to-video translating system comprising: a selective frequency filter for separating an audio input signal into a plurality of separate control signals having frequencies falling within a given range; a light array associated with each control signal; an electrical circuit connecting each of the control signals with a respective one of the light arrays for initiating produc tion of light substantially simultaneously with the onset of the associated control signal; and time shift means associated with the electrical circuit for sequentially and spatially displacing light produced in each of the light arrays for visually representing the duration of the control signal. The time shift means may comprise a second electrical circuit associated with each of the light arrays, connected to the first electrical circuit and actuatable at the onset of its respective associated control signal to provide timed pulses to a third electrical circuit for sequentially supplying signals to a plurality of lights in the associated light array for said sequential spatial displacement of light.

17 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures PATENTEU R 2 3 I574 SHEET 1 BF 5 FIG] AUDIO D# INPUT Hra m@m@m@ @@%@m@@@ 3% Tu m 0. m w w 111 g g m@ m@ 3% 3 m@ g U hmafima mw fi 3 Q wm vmimiaflmamnw U y? m iATENTEU P m4 3.806573 SHEET u UF 5 265 FIG. 5

TRIGGER SHIFT RE G/S TE R TIME PERSPECTIVE AUDIO-VIDEO TRANSLATOR CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION The present application is a continuation-in-part of my copending patent application Ser. No. 217,186 filed Jan. 12, 1972.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The present invention relates to means for translating sensible energy of one form to sensible energy of a different form. In particular, the present invention pertains to a new and improved system for converting the electrical output from an audio-to-electrical transducer to a visible optical output. In particular, it concerns an audio-video system in which the video output is provided with means for sequentially and spatially displacing light relative to the frequency of associated audio signals for representing the durationthereof; thus, providing time perspective to the video output.

2. Brief Description of the Prior Art The basic concept of producing light or color variations responsive to an audio signal has been employed in a variety of prior art systems. In certain of these systems, the audio signal is employed to regulate intensity and/or color of an optical output means with most common systems having a plurality of differently colored, randomly grouped incandescent light bulbs in a video display. Various specific physical arrangements of the optical output devices, conforming to an organized array, have also been employed. Such systems are sometimes popularly referred to as color organs. A variety of such systems may be seen in the following U.S. Pat. Nos.: 1,654,068 Blattner, 1,728,860 Hector, 1,690,279 Craft, 1,783,789 Hector, 1,790,903 Craig, 3,165,966 Pribyl, 1,946,026 Lewis et al, 3,204,513 Balamuth, 2,131,934 Burchfield, 3,228,278 Wortman, 2,150,854 Whidden, 3,215,022 Orgo, 2,184,075 Goldstein, 3,240,099 Irons, 2,677,297 Wetzel, 3,241,419 Gracey, 3,016,783 Karraker, 3,292,861 Kawamura et al, 3,018,683 Way, 3,294,322 Kawamura et al, 3,048,075 Wright, 3,307,443 Shallenberger, 3,062,085 Smith, 3,318,187 Prohaska, 3,111,057 Cramer, 3,343,453 Butterfleld, 3,163,077 Shank.

In more recent systems designed to produce simultaneous audio and video outputs with a time correlation between the two signals, suitable frequency selective networks have been employed to separate the frequency components of the transduced audio signal whereby passage of a signal component through a given filter network permits activation of the associated optical means to produce light of a desired color. For example, see U.S. Pat. No. 3,228,278 Wortman.

In general, prior art systems have been directed toward enhancement of an audio output by simultaneous exposure to a video output. Such simultaneous exposure to both audio and video outputs have created sound and sight sensations heretofore not experienced. However, very few of the prior art systems have been suitable for actually communicating intelligent sound, such as music.

In my aforementioned;,copending patent application Ser. No. 217,186, an audio-video translator is disclosed having a plurality of frequency selective networks to separate an audio signal into its component frequencies. The output from each filter network is employed to activated trigger circuits which in turn regulate the supply of power to light producing means. Each light producing means might be arranged in a color array representing a musical octave based on the equal temperance scale, which employs 12 equal divisions of an octave called semi-tones or notes. Each semi-tone may be represented by a separate colored light ranging from one end of the color spectrum, at one end of the octave, to the opposite end of the color spectrum, at the opposite endof the octave. A plurality of octaves may be represented by a plurality of arrays, in which corresponding semi-tones or notes are represented by corresponding colors, but perhaps of a darker or lighter hue, depending on whether the octave represents a higher or lower octave. Thus, intelligent sound, i.e., music, may be visually communicated, making it possible even for deaf persons to understand music.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In the present invention, as in the improved audiovideo communication system of my copending patent application Ser. No. 217,186, a plurality of frequency selective networks is provided to separate an audio signal into a plurality of separate control signals having frequencies falling within a given range. A light array is associated with each of the control signals and an electrical circuit is provided for connecting each of the control signals with a respective one of the light arrays for initiating production of light substantially simultaneously with the onset of its associated control signal.

In addition, the system is provided with time shift means associated with the first electrical circuit for sequentially and spatially displacing light produced in each'of the light arrays relative to the frequency of its associated control signal for representing the duration of the control signal. The time shift means is unique and provides the viewer an added time perspective to the audio signals, usually music, introduced to the system. The purpose of this additional time perspective is to demonstrate how music is constructed and how it appears with respect to time. In some ways, this is analogous to overtones in a concert hall which reach the audience, via reflection, anywhere from 0.1 to 1.0 seconds after they are originally played by an orchestra.

The time shift means may comprise a second electrical circuit associated with each of the light arrays connected to the first electrical circuit and actuatable at the onset of its respective associated control signal to provide timed pulses to still another electrical circuit for sequentially supplying signals to a plurality of lights in the associated light array to effect the aforementioned sequential, spatial displacement of light.

In an electro-mechanical embodiment of the invention, the light arrays may be arranged in concentric circles and the time shift means may comprise a plurality of rotating discs, each of which is provided with an aperture radially spaced from the disc axis so as to travel in the path of its respective circular light array to present the appearance of a rotating light source. In such an embodiment, the first electrical circuit may be adapted to terminate production of light upon termination of the associated control signal.

Thus, not only does the system of the present invention provide accurate audio-to-visual translation, which may be used for communicating intelligent sound such s music, it also provides an added time perspective of the intelligent sound to the viewer. Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art upon reading the following specification and claims in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a schematic block diagram illustrating an audio-video translator according to a preferred embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a schematic circuit diagram illustrating electrical networks which may be employed in preferred embodiments of the invention;

FIG. 3 is a schematic block diagram of an electromechanical embodiment of the invention in which time perspective is represented in a circular pattern;

FIG. 4 is a schematic circuit diagram illustrating power control and trigger circuitry which may be utilized in the circular time perspective embodiment of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a schematic representation of electromechanical apparatus, similar to that shown in FIG. 3, but suitable for providing a plurality of concentric light arrays, each representing a different range of frequencies and having unique cycle times;

FIG. 6 is a schematic block diagram illustrating electronic apparatus for a circular video presentation of time perspective, similar to the electro-mechanical embodiment illustrated in FIG. 3; and

FIG. 7 is a schematic circuit diagram illustrating an electrical network suitable for use with the circular time perspective system illustrated in FIG. 6.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring first to FIG. 1, there is shown an audio filter F, for separating an audio input into a plurality of control signals representing particular audio frequencies present in the audio input. For purposes of illustration, the frequencies are broken down into ranges corresponding with the twelve semi-tones or notes in a musical octave based on the equal temperance scale. Of course, the system may include several octaves, only one being shown for purposes of illustration. The I2 output channels of filter F one for each note or semitone, are connected to an equal number of audio control and trigger circuits 1-12 which are in turn connected to power control circuits 13-24 for the first light source 25-36 in a plurality (l2 in the present case) of horizontal light arrays.

Each of the first light sources 25-36 is aligned in a vertical column or array representing time zero (t in the duration of time during which the audio frequencies for the twelve notes or semi-tone exist. Each succeeding light source, in the horizontal arrays, represent a time increment shift of the audio information originally displayed in the vertical array t In other words, the lights in the vertical array 1, (61-72) represent information displayed in vertical array t at one interval of time past, say on the order of 0.02 to 0.2 seconds. The lights 97-108 in the vertical array 2, represent audio information displayed under vertical array t at two time intervals past; the lights 121-132 in vertical array t represent audio information displayed under vertical array t at three time intervals past; lights -156 represent audio information at four time intervals past, etc. The total time span represented by displays t -t could be on the order of 0.1 to 1 second.

The lights representing each semi-tone or note in a vertical array may be a separate color ranging from one end of the color spectrum, at one end of the octave, to the opposite end of the color spectrum, at the opposite end of the octave. For example, the lights in vertical array t might be as follows:

Light Number Semi-tone Color 25 G Violet 26 G Blue-Violet 27 F Indigo 28 F Blue 29 E Blue-Green 30 D# Green 31 D Yellow-Green 32 C# Green-Yellow 33 C Yellow 34 B Orange 35 A Red-Orange 36 A Red Of course, these colors may be arranged in other ways.

To effect sequential and spatial displacement of light along each horizontal array, representing a particular note or semi-tone, some time shift means or apparatus is required. Thus, the system is provided with a plurality of binary digit shift registers 73-84, each having four outputs, in the present case, connected to respective power circuitry 49-60, 85-96, 109-120 and 133-144 for supplying power to the remaining lights in each horizontal array representing time intervals t t t and t etc. The shift registers 73-84 are connected, through the audio control and trigger circuits 1-12, to the twelve channel output of filter Fa. Each shift register 73-84 is also connected to a corresponding clock and adjustable rate circuitry 37-48.

Referring now to FIG. 2 an exemplary electrical network is shown for the five channel time perspective array (t t,, t t of FIG. 1. Such a system includes filter Fa and audio control and trigger circuitry 1-12 for each range of frequencies to be included in the system. For example, if the system is for a one octave 12 note musical scale, there would be 12 of such circuits. Also included for each range of frequencies, is a clock and adjustable rate circuitry 37-48, a four channel shift register 73-84, and power circuitry 49-60, 85-96, 109-120, 133-144.

The filter circuit Fa comprises a resistor 161 and a capacitor 163 connected between the audio input and an amplifier 164. The selectivity of the filter, or bandwidth of the filter response, is determined by the values of 161, 163. Increasing the resistance of resistor 161 and decreasing the capacitance of capacitor 163 will effectively narrow the response bandwidth. Capacitors 165, 166 and 167 and resistors 168, 169 and 170 form the center frequency determining network by providing a maximum impedance resistance when the center frequency is received via the audio input. Thus, the networks maximum resistance at the center frequency provides the greatest gain for the amplifier 164. Values of resistor 171 and capacitors 17 2 and 173 are chosen to give the proper feedback and frequency compensation characteristics for the amplifier 164; the values of resistor 171 and cpacitor 172 determine the input lag, while capacitor 173 determines the output lag.

In the audio control and trigger circuits 1-12, the output from the filter is rectified by diodes 180 and 181 and is filtered via capacitor 182 to give a DC. signal. Resistor 183 is a bleeder resistor, while resistor 184 acts as a current limiting resistor. Capacitor 185 provides energy to fire pulse diode or unilateral switch 187 when the DC. signal on diode 181 surpasses 7.5 volts. Capacitor 185 charges from the peak detection D.C. output from the filter network and fires pulse diode 187 when the output reaches 7.5 volts. The aforementioned components may be formed from integrated circuitry.

A pulse transformer 190 isolates the integrated circuitry from the power control circuitry 13-24 for lamploads -36 of channel one (t This circuitry includes a resistor 191 and triac 192.

Diode 195 acts to pass the trigger signal pulse to SCR 240 in order to initiate the shift sequence with a time delay between the lamploads at 1 and those at t,. As SCR 240 fires, the gate circuitry of SCR 204 begins to charge off the anode of SCR 240, thus allowing a t interval of time before SCR 204 fires its triac 220, which provides A.C. currents for its lamp load 61-72.

The shift timing sequence is determined by the adjustable relaxation oscillator or clock network 37-48 made up of an N channel depletion mode junction field effect transistor 214, resistor 215, potentiometer 216, and capacitor 217. During each oscillation, this network provides a positive voltage to the pulse wave forming network made up of programmable unijunction transistor 207, resistor 218 and resistor 219. Positive pulses from the wave forming network are continuous for the duration of each oscillation of the oscillator network, and are delivered to channels two, three, four and five (t,, t t;,, t,) via diodes 201, 202, 203 and 241.

Channel two (t,) is made up to triac 220, load 61-72, SCR 204, and RC trigger network resistors 223, 224 and capacitor 225. Channel three (t is made up of triac 221, load 97-108, SCR 205, and RC trigger network resistors 226, 212 and capacitor 209. Channel four is made up of triac 222, load 121-132, SCR 226, and RC trigger network resistors 227, 213 and capacitor 210. Channel five (1,) is made up of triac 243, load 145-156, SCR 244 and RC trigger network resistors 245, 246 and capacitor 247.

When SCR 204 fires, it provides a negative voltage to the junction of capacitor 209, resistor 212 and diode 202. After SCR 204 shuts off, the negative voltage at this junction is made positive via the pulse brought in by diode 202. This pulse at the junction causes the gate of SCR 205 to be made more positive relative to its cathode for the duration of the oscillation of the oscillator network, thereby firing SCR 205 for that period of oscillation time. As SCR 205 fires, it triggers triac 221, which lights lamp load 97-108. Channel four is activated similarly; as SCR 205 fires, a negative voltage is seen at the junction of capacitor 210, resistor 213 and diode 203. After SCR 205 shuts off (i.e., when the oscillator circuitry stops its positive pulse to the junction of capacitor 209, resistor 212, via diode 202), a new oscillation then provides another positive pulse to the junction of capacitor 210, resistor 213, thereby allowing the gate of SCR 206 to be made positive relative to its cathode. SCR 206 then tires for the duration of the positive oscillation of the oscillator network, then it shuts off. Channel five (t,,) is activated similarly.

A negative voltage must be seen at the junctions of capacitors 225, 209, 210, 247 and resistors 224, 212, 213, 245 before the oscillators positive pulse will fire the respective gates of SCR 204', 205, 206, 244. Thus, after SCR 244 turns off, SCR 240 must be fired from the filter circuitry before the sequence will activate again. Adjusting potentiometer 216 will increase or decrease the number of positive oscillations per second thus controlling the shift rate from SCR 240 to SCR 204, 205, 206, 244. Resistors 228, 229, 230 and 231 act as current limiting resistors to the triac gates. Resistor 248 acts as a bleeder for the input positive pulse from the filter. Resistor 235 is also a bleeder resistor.

Other circuits are known which are suitable for providing the time shifting required in the present invention. Although such circuits are known in the art, their application to the present invention are not.

The time perspective audio-video translators described with reference to FlGS. 1 and 2 have been described for displays in which the lights are arranged in linear arrays such as the twelve note octave horizontal and vertical arrays of FIG. 1. However, there are certain applications in which a circular array might be desired. Referring now to FIGS. 3, 4 and 5, a simplified electromechanical method will be described for achieving such an arrangement.

As seen in FIG. 3, a rotating circular disc 250 may be placed in front of an audio actuated visual display 258 responding to a particular frequency range f. An aperture 251 is cut out of the disc 250 so as to be placed directly over a continuous circle light source such as a neon tube 252. As the disc 250 is rotated by motor 254 and power source 255, the light 252 from the rear display appears to be rotating about the center of the disc. The duration of time the rear light display is on then appears as a moving spot, generating a complete circle (if the light 252 is on for a full rotation of the disc). This rotationally described geometric circle gives a visual representation of the duration of time of the note or frequency range f of the activating audio signal. A prefabricated circular neon tube would be preferable since it would give a uniform light dispersion around each concentric circle. A projector lens or Fresnel lens 256 could be placed at the back of the disc over the aperture 251 so as to intensify the light coming through the slit. Aluminized mylar could form a reflector surface and partition; thus acting both to intensify the light and block out unwanted light from other sources.

For a four channel display, four apertures can be placed on the same disc so that they are directly over four concentric continuous bands of light. If a single disc with four apertures were employed, the cycle time for each concentric display would be the same. In a preferred form, the time per revolution of the disc should be set to correspond to the average duration of a given frequency ranges information. In general, the cycle time for, the higher frequency displays should be shorter than those for the lower displays, since the higher frequency ranges carry a greater amount of audio information than the lower frequency ranges do. A four-channel mechanical means could be devised so that each of the four concentrically placed apertures would rotate about the center independently of each other, thus giving each aperture a unique cycle time.

FIG. shows a possible complex mechanical means for a four-channel display in which each aperture has a unique cycle time. In such a display, there are four concentric discs 261-264, each having an aperture 265-268 registrable with concentric neon lights 271-274 mounted on a rear display board 270. Each disc would be attached to one of four concentric shafts 275 to the rear end of which are attached gears 276 mating with an equal number of gears 277 attached to the shaft of motor 278. The gears 276 and 277 would be selected so that each disc 261-264 would have its own independent cycle time. For example, the general time range for each frequency range in a four-channel display might be as below:

Frequence Range Cycle Time Range High moo-15,000 cps) sseq MidMidhigh (700-2000 cps) nnm Sm Mid-Midlow 200-700 cps) 1 See Low 70-200 cps) /2-2 sec.

Referring to FIG. 4, the power control and trigger circuitry necessary for a neon or fluorescent light source for use in the electro-mechanical circular time perspective displays just described are shown. The filter and trigger circuitry 280 would be similar to that shown in FIG. 2 and would include the amplifier 281 and its respective RC filter network 282. This circuitry would provide the pulse through the primary winding of transformer 283 which is coupled via the secondary winding to provide a biasing pulse voltage that prefires the adjustable trigger circuit composed of trigger diodes 285, 286, resistors 287, 288, 289 and triac 290. Power is supplied to the ballast 292 for neon or fluorescent bulb 293.

A nearly identical effect to that of the electromechanical system described with reference to FIGS. 3-5 can be produced electrically by means ofa sequential firing circuit and an associated circle of a plurality of lights, such as in FIG. 6. The lights will then flash sequentially around the circle in intervals of time (t). The time to complete one revolution of the lights 301-310 is equivalent to the electro-mechanical systems time per revolution of the disc apertures. The sequential circuitry can be set so that a revolution about the circle of light may correspond to any time interval. The sequential circuitry can also be made to constantly recirculate just as the disc constantly revolves. However, the A.C. current line attached to the other side of the lamp load is audio actuated and controlled via an audio-visual translator composed of filter, trigger, and power control circuitries similar to those described in FIG. 2. Therefore, only when an audio signal is of a proper frequency will the A.C. current be fed to the sequential display. When this A.C. current is allowed to flow, it will activate whichever light the sequential circuitry happens to be on at that time. If the proper audio frequency signal continues for a portion of the time corresponding to the time it takes to sequentially complete this circle of a plurality of lights, the display seen will be a portion of the circle. This partial circle will then represent a time visualization of the duration of each frequency range heard. The light bulbs used for this electronic method should have a very quick response, e.g., fast incandescent or neon bulbs.

FIG. 6 illustrates an electronic system for a single frequency and a 10 light circle. Of course, any number of lights and any number of sequencing channels may be used. The circular light array comprises lights 301-310 which are connected via a common line 311 to power control 312, trigger 313 and filter 314 circuitry. The system is also provided with a l0 channel recirculating shift register 320 which comprises triacs 321-330 attached to respective lights 301-310 for sequential operation.

FIG. 7 represents an exemplary shift register circuitry suitable for use with the system of FIG. 6. This circuitry is similar to the shift register circuitry of FIG. 2. However, there is one major change, in that the circuitry is made to recirculate by having channel one (SCR-1) fire after channel ten (SCR 10) by linking the trigger RC networks of the first and last channels. When SCR 10 of channel 10 fires, it causes a negative potential at the junction of capacitor 341, diode 342 and resistor 343. When the oscillator finishes its positive oscillation, SCR 10 of channel 10 shuts off. The oscillator then begins another positive oscillation which is delivered via diode 342 to the junction just described. When this positive pulse train is applied to the above junction, the gate of SCR 1 of channel one is made positive relative to its cathode for the duration of the oscillation. This causes SCR 1 of channel one to fire for this oscillation. To start the sequence initially, a trigger network made up of programmable unijunction transistor PUT resistors R,, and R and capacitor C, is employed. After SCR 1 fires initially, this network is then rendered inoperative by diodes 351, 352, 353, etc., to 360, which dissipate the charge on capacitor C,, to the anodes of SCR 1 through SCR 10 whenever anyone of these SCRs fires. Additional triacs 421, 521 and corresponding loads or lamps (not shown) may be added to each channel so that a plurality of lights may be caused to respond to each time interval signal.

An additional audio actuating circuit A (see dotted box) may be provided to allow the sequencing rate to be synchronized to the audio information, for example, a musical beat. The adjustment of the potentiometer P, in the circuit will change the frequency response of the filter. This filter is an LCR resonating circuit which is composed of transformer T potentiometer P resistors R and R", capacitors C and diode D. Diode D acts to rectify the A.C., thereby providing a positive voltage to the anode of the programmable unijunction transistor PUT which corresponds with the programmable unijunction transistor 214 in FIG. 2.

Thus, the present invention provides a means by which time perspective may be introduced to an audiovideo translating system. Exemplary embodiments illustrating linear and circular displays, have been described. Of course other configurations may be used. For example a variant concept would be to have a unified design in which each color of the design would have a separate, three or more channel audiosynchronized shift register and light means arranged in n groups of lights (such as triads). Such a system would provide more motion. Each color band would not only pulse with the music, but would also shift about the unified design in audio-synchronized or manually set rates. The audio synchronization could be such that each synchronizing audio filter in the shift register would correspond to the approximate frequency range of the filter in the audio-visual translator.

In fact, many variations may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of the invention. It is therefore intended that the scope of the invention be limited only by the claims which follow.

I claim:

1. An audio-to-video translating system comprising:

a. frequency selective filter means for separating an audio input signal into a plurality of separate control signals having frequencies falling within a given range;

b. a light array associated with each of said control signals;

c. first circuit means connecting each of said control signals with a respective one of said light arrays for initiating production of light substantially simultaneously with the onset of said associated control signal; and

d. time shift means associated with said first circuit means for sequentially and spatially displacing light produced in each of said light arrays relative to the duration of said associated control signal for representing the duration of the separated portions of said audio input signal with which said control signal is associated.

2. An audio-to-video translating system as set forth in claim 1 in which each of said light arrays comprises a plurality of light means in prearranged patterns to represent intervals of time during said duration of its associated control signal.

3. An audio-to-video translating system as set forth in claim 2 in which said time shift means comprises second circuit means associated with each of said light arrays, connected to said first circuit means and actuatable at the onset of its respective associated control signal to provide timed pulses to third circuit means for sequentially supplying signals to said plurality of light means in the associated light array for said sequential spatial displacement of light.

4. An audio-to-video translating system as set forth in claim 2 in which there are any number of lights n in each array representing n-l intervals of time from time zero to time n in the duration of said associated control signal.

5. An audio-to-video translating system as set forth in claim 3 in which said third circuit means comprises recirculating means connecting the first and last light means in at least one of said light arrays to cause said light to be spatially displaced through said light means in a prearranged order from said first to said last and back to said first light means for the duration of said associated control signal.

6. An audio-to-video translating system as set forth in claim 3 in which a variable LCR resonating circuit is connected to said second circuit means for synchronizing the rate at which said timed pulses are provided to said third circuit means.

7. An audio-to-video translating system as defined in claim 1 in which at least one of of said light arrays is ar ranged in a circle, said light being spatially displaced along the path of said circle.

8. An audio-to-video translating system as set forth in claim 7 in which said light array comprises a continuous circular light means, said time shift means comprising disc means mounted for rotation on an axis substantially concentric with the axis of said circular, light array and having an aperture radially spaced from said axis so as to travel in the path of said circular light means to present the appearance of a rotating light source, said first circuit means being adapted to terminate production of light from said circular light means upon termination of said associated control signal.

9. An audio-to-video translating system as set forth in claim 8 in which there are a plurality of said light arrays arranged in concentric circles, said disc means being provided with a corresponding number of apertures radially spaced on corresponding concentric circles of said disc means.

10. An audio-to-video translating system as set forth in claim 9 in which said disc means comprise a plurality of discs each one associated with one of said light arrays and rotatable at different speeds corresponding to the average duration of the control signal to which its associated light array is connected.

11. An audio-to-video translating system as set forth in claim 7 in which said one of said light arrays comprises a plurality of light means arranged in said circle, said time shift means comprising second circuit means connected to said first circuit means and actuatable at the onset of its respective associated control signal to provide timed pulses to third circuit means for sequentially supplying signals to said plurality of light means for sequential spatial displacement of light in the path of said circle.

12. An audio-to-video translating system as set forth in claim 11 in which said third circuit means comprises recirculating means connecting the first and last light means in said light array to cause light to be continuously, sequentially and spatially displaced around said circle for the duration of said associated control signal.

13. An audio-to-video translating system as set forth in claim 12 in which a variable LCR resonating circuit is connected to said second circuit means for synchronizing the rate at which said timed pulses are provided to said third circuit means.

14. An audio-to-video translating system comprising:

a. frequency selective filter means for separating an audio input signal into a plurality of separate control signals having frequencies falling within a given range;

b. a light array, associated with each of said control signals, having a plurality of lights in a prearranged pattern;

c. power control circuitry connected to each of said lights in each of said light arrays;

d. means connecting each of said control signals with the power control circuitry of a first light in an associated light array for initiating production of light substantially simultaneously with the onset of said associated control signal; and

e. time shift means connecting each of said control signals with the power control circuitry of other lights in said associated light array for sequentially producing and terminating light in said other lights at timed intervals relative to the initiation of light production in said first light throughout the duration of said associated control signal.

15. An audio-to-video translating system as set forth in claim 14 in which said other lights are spatially placed relative to said first light and each other so that said light is spatially and sequentially displaced in said prearranged pattern during said duration of said associated control signal.

in claim 16 in which said time shift means comprises recirculating means connecting the last to light of said other lights with said first light to cause said sequential time activation of said power control circuitry to be repeated throughout the duration of said associated control signal.

Patent Citations
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US3038061 *Jun 23, 1959Jun 5, 1962Colorsound Mfg Co IncApparatus for translating sound into correlated physical effects
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4056805 *Dec 17, 1976Nov 1, 1977Brady William MProgrammable electronic visual display systems
US4622881 *Dec 6, 1984Nov 18, 1986Michael RandVisual display system with triangular cells
US4790629 *Sep 29, 1986Dec 13, 1988Michael RandVisual display system with triangular cells
US5083064 *Sep 22, 1988Jan 21, 1992Jones Sr Charles WLamp modulating circuitry for incandescent and fluorescent lamps
Classifications
U.S. Classification84/464.00R, 340/815.46
International ClassificationA63J17/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63J17/00
European ClassificationA63J17/00