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Publication numberUS3806938 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 23, 1974
Filing dateMar 1, 1973
Priority dateMar 1, 1973
Also published asCA981342A, CA981342A1, DE2409974A1, DE2409974B2
Publication numberUS 3806938 A, US 3806938A, US-A-3806938, US3806938 A, US3806938A
InventorsR Engram, R Zegarski
Original AssigneeMotorola Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shock falsing inhibitor circuit for a plural tone receiver
US 3806938 A
Abstract
In a sequential plural tone receiver, the first tone is detected and differentiated to produce a pulse which begins when the tone is received and continues for a predetermined duration. The differentiated pulse and the detected second tone are applied to an AND gate which, if both signals are simultaneously applied, provides an output that inhibits the operation of the receiver and is applied through a latch to the input of the AND gate to maintain the AND gate in operation until the second tone stops. If the second tone appears at any time after the differentiated pulse is removed the receiver operates in a normal fashion.
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United States Patent 191 Zegarski et al.

[ Apr. 23, 1974 SHOCK F ALSING INHIBITOR CIRCUIT FOR A PLURAL TONE RECEIVER Inventors: Ronald J. Zegarski, Coral Springs,

Fla; Robert L. Engram, Mountainview, Calif.

Assignee: Motorola, Inc., Franklin Park, Ill.

Filed: Mar. 1, 1973 Appl. No.: 337,057

U.S. Cl. 340/167 R, 340/171 R, 340/164 R Int. Cl H04g 5/00 Field of Search.....' 340/167 R, 171 R References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 9/1969 Carsello 340/167 RV Primary ExaminerHarold I. Pitts Attorney, Agent, or FirmEugene A. Parsons; Vincent J. Rauner [5 7] ABSTRACT until the second tone stops. If the second tone appears at any time after the differentiated pulse is removed the receiver operates in a normalfashion.

8 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures FILTER l0 row: A

AMPLIFIER REED ,F/LTEI? /3 TONE a /4 AMPLIFIER a/ 30 DETECTOR FALSl/VG A CIRCUIT 2/ AMPLIFIER a I 0572:7017 4 I CLAMP H INHIBITOR I- OWN {ATEMED APR 2 3 I974 I'ulllullllllal'llil SHOCK FALSING INHIBITOR CIRCUIT FOR A PLURAL TONE RECEIVER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The present device pertains to plural tone receivers wherein at least two tones are transmitted in a predetermined sequence and a specific receiver responds to these tones. It has become quite common to use frequency selective reed devices in tone decoders because such devices provide a very sharp response to select signals of one frequency from signals of closely adjacent frequencies. Miniature reed devices have been provided for small portable units, such as paging units, wherein selective alarms are provided. However, such portable units may be dropped or otherwise subjected to shock which can cause vibratory movement of the reeds to provide false alarm signals. Another problem is that the received signal may include simultaneously a large number of frequencies including the frequencies to which the tone selective devices respond to cause false operation.

2. Description of the Prior Art In U.S. Pat. No 3,355,709, issued to G. M. Hanus on Nov. 28, 1967 and assigned to the same assignee, a sequential tone receiver is utilized wherein the first tone, if correct, blanks the second channel until after termination thereof whereupon the output of the first channel opens the second channel to allow passage of a correct second tone. Thus, as long as the second tone is present after the first tone terminates the receiver will respond.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,477,133, issued to W. J. Cole et al. on May 27, 1969 and assigned to the same assignee, describes a tone inhibitor circuit for plural tone receivers wherein a timing circuit is connected between two channels and a first tone received in the first channel enables the second channel to receive a second tone only within a particular time duration after the termination of the first tone.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,465,294, issued to R. D. Carsello et al. on Sept. 2, 1969 and assigned to the same assignee, discloses a third type of inhibitor circuit for plural tone receivers wherein a proper tone applied to the first channel enables the second channel only a predetermined time after the first tone terminates.

In each of the above-described inhibitor circuits an exceptionally long second tone, produced by shocking, jarring, or some other external interference, may cause falsing of the receiver. In addition, the above-described inhibiting circuits may be susceptible to multiple shocks, shocks of varying severity, shocks during partly correct paging sequences, etc. While each of the above-described circuits prevents falsing under normal conditions and substantially reduces the falsing under most of the above-described conditions, some falsing may still occur and this falsing may be especially predominant in particular geographic locations (high electrical interference areas) or in particular jobs (where the person carrying the receiver is highly active).

SUMMARY THE INVENTION The present invention pertains to a shock falsing i'nhibitor circuit for a plural tone receiver including first and second detector means adapted to receive first and second tone signals and provide square pulses equal in duration to the tone'signals in response to the tone signals, differentiating means coupled to the first detector for differentiating the first square pulse and providing a pulse of predetermined duration in response thereto, AND gate means connected to receive the pulse from the differentiating means and the square pulse from the second detector for providing an inhibiting signal therefrom in response to the simultaneous application of the two pulses, and latching means connectedfrom the output of the gate means to the input thereof for maintaining operation of the gate means for the duration of the second pulse whenever the second pulse and the differentiated pulse are applied simultaneously. Thus, Whenever the first tone signal is received a window is provided from the leading edge. thereof for a predetermined duration, during which time the reception of the second tone signal will produce an inhibit signal for the duration of the second tone signal.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a new shock falsing inhibitor circuit for a plural tone receiver which provides a window, in response to a first tone signal, from the leading edge of the first tone signal for a predetermined duration and which, upon the reception of a second tone signal during the predetermined duration, provides an inhibit signal to prevent the operation of the receiver.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a shock falsing inhibitor circuit for a plural tone receiver which has fewer components and positive protection from simultaneous tones. 7

these and other objects of this invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon consideration of the accompanying specification, claims and drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Referring to the drawings, wherein like characters indicate like parts throughout the figures:

FIG. 1 is a block diagram of a plural tone receiver incorporating the present shock falsing inhibitor circuit;

FIG. 2 is a block diagram of the present shock falsing inhibitor circuit; and FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram of the shock falsing inhibitor circuit illustrated in block form in FIG. 2.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to FIG. 1 there is shown a blockdiagram of a plural tone receiver incorporating an embodiment of a shock falsing inhibitor circuit. A carrier modulated by tone signals is received by receiver I0 and detected to develop audio signals. The tones are amplified in audio amplifier 11 and coupled to two reed filters 12 and 13. Reed filters l2 and 13 are activated by tones of the proper frequency and develop output signals which are applied to amplifier and detector circuits l4 and 15, respectively. The outputs from the amplifier and detector circuits 14 and 15 are negative going square pulses having a duration approximately equal to the duration of the output signals from the reed filters 12 and 13. While the present shock falsing inhibitor circuit is designed to operate on a variety of combinations of timing between tones A and B (first and second tones), the signal transmitted in the present embodiment constitutes a tone A signal having approximately a one second duration followed immediately by a tone B signal having approximately a three second duration.

A clamping circuit 20, which operates as a normally closed gate, is connected to the output of the amplifier and detector circuit 14 for operation in response to and output signal therefrom. The clamping circuit 20 is also connected to the output of the amplifier and detector circuit 15 for passing an output signal therefrom, during operation of the clamping circuit 20, to an inhibiting circuit 21 and, from the inhibiting circuit 21, to an audio output circuit 25. Upon receipt of the correct tone A the amplifier and detector circuit 14 provides a signal which opens the clamping circuit 20. If a correct tone B follows the tone A the amplifier and detector circuit 15 provides an output signal which passes through the clamping circuit and the inhibiting circuit 21 (as will be described presently) to the audio output circuit 25. While a relatively simple plural tone receiver is illustrated in block form, which receiver is only for providing a paging signal, it should be'undcrstood that this receiver is illustrated and disclosed only for exemplary purposes and a great variety of different types of receivers might be utilized with the present shock falsing inhibitor circuit.

The outputs of the amplifier and detector circuits 14 and 15 are also applied to a falsing circuit 30, the output of which is applied to the inhibitor circuit'21. The inhibitor circuit 21 is constructed to normally pass the output from the clamping circuit 20 to the audio output 25 unless the falsing circuit provides an output Neither the clamping circuit 20 nor the inhibiting circuit 21 are illustrated in detail herein since any of a variety of circuits can be utilized by those skilled in the art.

Referring to FIG. 2, the falsing circuit 30 is illustrated in block form. The output of the amplifier and detector circuit 14 is applied to a differentiator 31, the output of which is applied to one input of an AND gate 32. The output of the amplifier and detector circuit 15 is applied to a second input of the AND gate and the output of the AND gate 32 is applied to the inhibitor circuit 21. The output of the AND gate 32 is also applied to a latching circuit 33, the output of which is applied to the first input of the AND gate 32. The operation of the catching circuit 33 is such that whenever the AND circuit 32 provides an output the latching circuit 33 operates to maintain a signal at the first input of the AND gate 32 so that the AND gate 32'continues to provide an output signal to the inhibitor 21 as long as the amplifier and detector circuit 15 provides an output.

Referring to FIG. 3, a schematic diagram of the falsing circuit 30 is illustrated. Output signals from the amplifier and detector circuit 14 are applied to a terminal 35 which is connected through a relatively large capacitor 36 to the control or base electrode of an NPN type transistor 37. The first or collector electrode of the transistor 37 is connected through a resistor 40 to a terminal 41 adapted to have a suitable source of positive voltage applied thereto. The second or emitter electrode of the transistor 37 is connected to the anode of a diode 42, the cathode of which is connected to the negative terminal of the voltage source or ground 43. The base of the transistor 37 is connected through ,a resistor 45 to the terminal 41 and is also connected to the first or collector electrode of 'a second NPN type transistor 50. The second or emitter electrode of the transistor is connected to a terminal 51 which is connected to receive output signals from the amplifier and detector circuit 15. The base or control electrode of the transistor 50 is connected through a resistor 52 to the collector of the transistor 37 and to the base or control electrode of a third NPN type transistor 55. The first or collector electrode of the transistor-55 is con nected to the positive terminal 41 and the second or emitter electrode is connected to the inhibiting circuit 21 by way of an output terminal 56.

In the operation of the falsing circuit 30, when a negative going square pulse, provided by the reception of a correct tone A, is applied to the terminal 35, the capacitor 36 and resistor 45 operate to differentiate the circuit to produce a negative going pulse at the base of the transistor 37. The duration of the negative going pulse is determined by the size of the capacitor 36 and resistor 45 and should be of sufficient duration to insure that tone A and tone B are not produced by a common mechanical or electrical shock on reed filters 12 and 13. The resistor 45 also serves to bias the transistor 37 normally into conduction and, it should be noted, that the positive portion of the differcntiatcdsquare wave has substantially no effect on the circuit and may be ignored. With no signal applied to the terminal 35 and the transistor 37 conducting-in or near saturation, the transistors 50 and 55 are both non-conductive.

When the negative going square pulse from the amplifier and detector 14 is applied to the terminal 35, the negative going leading edge thereof coincides with the negative going leading edge of the pulse applied to the base of the transistor 37. When the base of the transistor 37 drops sharply in a negative direction, conduction in the transistor 37 is sharply reduced and the potential on the collector moves sharply in a positive direction. This positive going potential is applied to the base of the transistor 55 and, through the resistor 52, to the base of the transistor 50. However, the circuit is designed so that the positive going potential on the collector of the transistor 37 due to tone A being received is insufficient to produce conduction in transistor 50.

If, while the negative pulse is present on the base of the transistor 37, a negative going square pulse from the amplifier and detector circuit 15 is applied to the terminal 51, the potential of the emitter of transistor 50 drops to near ground potential so'that the transistor 50 is biased into conduction. With transistor 50 conducting, the potential on the base of the transistor 37, which was held at appproximately 2 diode drops by the diode 42 and base to emitter junction'of the transistor 37- is clamped near ground potential thereby keeping transistor 37 in the cutoff state. With transistor 50 at or near saturation and transistor 37 at or near cutoff the potential on the base of the transistor 55 is sufficient to produce conduction therein and provide an-output at the terminal 56 to operate the inhibiting circuit 21 and prevent an audio output from the circuit 25.

It should be noted that once the negative square pulse is applied to the terminal 51 when the negative pulses from the amplifier and detector circuits 14 and 15 can be applied to the terminals 35 and 51, respectively, individually without causing conduction of the transistor 55 and the consequent output of a signal. However, whenever the negative pulse or window, which extends from the leading edge of tone A a predetermined duration, is present on the base of the transistor 37 the application of a negative going signal to the terminal 51 triggers the AND gate and the latch to prevent the output of an audio signal from the circuit 25 for the duration of the negative signal applied to the terminal 51. In the present circuit utilized with the length of tones A and B previously described, the size of the capacitor 36 is approximately 1 microfarad and the size of the resistor 45 is approximately 1 megohm. The size of the resistors 40 and 52 are approximately 47 K-ohms and 270 K-ohms, respectively. For components of this size the window or duration of negative pulse supplied by the differentiator 31 is approximately 200 milliseconds.

Thus, a shock falsing inhibitor circuit is described which has substantially fewer components than any of the prior art circuits and which positively inhibits operation of the receiver upon reception of simultaneous tones. Further, while the falsing circuit inhibits operation of the receiver whenever simultaneous or near simultaneous pulses are produced in reed filters l2 and 13, by electrical or mechanical shocks or the like, the circuit is designed to operate for a variety of combinations of tones, i.e., slightly overlapping, sequential, slightly separated, etc.

While we have shown and described a specific embodiment of this invention, further modifications and improvements will occur to those skilled in the art. We desire it to be understood, therefore, that this invention is not limited to the particular form shown and we intend in the appended claims to cover all modifications which do not depart from the spirit and scope of this invention.

We claim:

1. A shock falsing inhibitor circuit for a plural tone receiver comprising:

a. first detector means adapted to receive a first tone signal and providing a first square pulse approximately equal in duration to the first tone signal in response to the first tone signal; 1

b. second detector means adapted to receive 'a second tone signal and providing a second square.

pulse approximately equal in duration to the second tone signal in response to the second tone signal; c. differentiating means coupled to said first detector means for providing a pulse having a predetermined duration in response to the first square pulse; gate means coupled to said means means and said second detector mens and providing an output signal in response to the simultaneous application of the pulse from the differentiating means and the second square pulse; and e. means coupled to said gate means and responsive to the output signal therefrom to inhibit the opera- I tion of the pural tone receiver. 2. A shock falsing inhibitor circuit as claimed in claim 1 including in addition latch means coupled to the gate means for applying an input signal to said gate means in response to an output signal from said gate means for the duration of the second square pulse.

3. A shock falsing inhibitor circuit as claimed in claim 2 wherein the gate means includes an AND gate.

4. A shock falsing inhibitor circuit'for a plural tone receiver comprising:

a. first, second and third transistors each having first,

second and control electrodes;

b. means coupling the first and second terminals of said first transistor between first and second junction points adapted to haveopposite terminals of a power supply connected thereto;

c. a resistor-capacitor network connected to the control electrode of said first transistor for biasing said first transistor normally into conduction and adapted to receive a square pulse generated by a first toneand supply a pulse of predetermined duration to the control electrode of said first transistor to reduce the conduction for said predetermined duration in response to the square pulse;

d. the first terminal of said second transistor being coupled to the control electrode of said first transistor and the second terminal of said second tansistor adapted to receive a second square pulse generated by a second tone;

e. means coupling the control electrode of said second transistor to the first electrode of said first transistor and to the control electrode of said third transistor; and

f. the first electrode of said third transistor being coupled to the first junction point and the second electrode of said third transistor being adapted to supply an inhibit signal in response to the second square pulse applied to the second terminal of said second transistor during the application of the pulse of predetermined duration to the control electrode of said first transistor.

5. A shock falsing inhibitor circuit as set forth in claim 4 wherein the means coupling the first and second terminalsof said first transistor between first and second junction points include a resistor coupled between the first terminal and the first junction point and a semiconductor diode coupled between the second terminal and the second junction point. I

6. A shock falsing inhibitor circuit as set forth in claim 4 wherein the resistor-capacitor network includes a series capacitor coupled to the control electrode of said first transistor and a resistor coupled between the control electrode of said first transistor and the first junction point.

7. A shock falsing inhibitor circuit as set forth in claim 4 wherein the means coupling the controlelectrode of said second transistor to the first electrode of said first transistor and to the control electrode of said third transistor includes a resistor.

8. A shock falsing inhibitor circuit as set forth in claim 4 wherein the first, second and third transistors are each the NPN conduction type with the first electrodes being the collectors and the second electrodes the emitters-and the first junction point is adapted to have a positive voltage supply connected thereto.

7 v i v

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3465294 *Mar 7, 1966Sep 2, 1969Motorola IncPlural channel frequency detecting circuit
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4019142 *Aug 16, 1974Apr 19, 1977Wycoff Keith HSelectively callable receiver operated in accordance with tone characteristics
US4769610 *Jun 29, 1987Sep 6, 1988Motorola, Inc.Tone decoder
Classifications
U.S. Classification340/12.11
International ClassificationG08B3/10, H04W88/02
Cooperative ClassificationG08B3/1008, G08B3/1016, H04W88/027
European ClassificationG08B3/10B1, G08B3/10B, H04W88/02S4F