Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3807414 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 30, 1974
Filing dateOct 8, 1971
Priority dateOct 15, 1970
Also published asCA942152A1, DE2150388A1
Publication numberUS 3807414 A, US 3807414A, US-A-3807414, US3807414 A, US3807414A
InventorsHedge R
Original AssigneeBritish American Tobacco Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method for making a non-tobacco smoking composition
US 3807414 A
Abstract
A process for the production of a smoking composition comprising impregnation of a alpha cellulose sheet material, with an aqueous solution of a polycarboxylic polymer comprising a carboxylic polysaccharide in the form of sodium alginate, or pectinic acid. The alpha cellulose sheet has a density of about 20g/per square meter and the additive contributes a 2% weight gain to the sheet.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Hedge Apr. 30, 1974 [54] METHOD FOR MAKING A NON-TOBACCO 3,461,879 8/1969 Kirkland 131/2 SMOKING COMPOSITION 3,545,448 12/1970 Mormon et a1.... 131/2 3,125,098 3/1964 Osborne l3l/l4OC Inventor; Roger Wllllam Hedge, 3,003,895 10/1961 Grunwald 131/17 S th t E l d amp FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS [73] Assignee: British-American Tobacco Company 687 507 3 [967 B l S 131 2 Limited, London, England e gium [221 Filed: 061. 8, 1971 Primary ExaminerMelvin D. Rein Attorney, Agent, o'r Firml(ane, Dalsimer, Kane, Sul- [21] Appl. No.. 187,815 van and Kumcz [30] Foreign Application Priority Data "01:1. 1531971 @1651 131113111 49095/71 1571 ABSTRACT A process for the production of a smoking composi- [52] US. Cl. 131/2 tion comprising impregnation of a alpha cellulose [51] Int. Cl... A24!) 15/00 sheet material, with an aqueous solution of a polycar [58] Field of Search..- 1'31/2, l5, 17, 140-144 boxylic polymer comprising a carboxylic p0ly5ah 1 ride in the form of sodium alginate, or pectinic acid. [56] References Cited The alpha cellulose sheet has a density of about UNITED STATES PATENTS 20g/per square meter and the additive contributes :1 2,933,420 4/1960 Haden et al 131/17 R 2% welght to the sheet 3,459,195 8/1969 Silberman 131/2 x 4 Claims N0 Drawings 3,638,660 2/1972 Davis... 131/2 1,961,866 6/1934 Rooker l3l/l5 R 3,529,602 9/1970 Hind et a]. 131/2 METHOD FOR MAKING A NON-TOBACCO SMOKING COMPOSITION This invention relates to the production of smoking compositions, particularly but not exclusively a nontobacco smoking composition, which on smoking gives a low delivery of total particulate matter (TPM). The invention also relates to cigarettes containing such a composition.

Non-tobacco smoking compositions comprising cellulosi'c material which has been treated, for example, with nitrogen dioxide so as to obtain a reduction in TPM, are known. The basis of the method is understood to be the oxidation of the primary hydroxyl of cellulose to the carboxyl function. The oxidation procedure is claimed to have the effect of reducing the TPM delivery from cellulose paper sheet, whilst sweetening the taste of the smoke. However, the oxidation of cellulosic material with nitrogen dioxide involves high investment and operating costs.

It is an object of the invention to provide a simple and economic process for the production of a smoking composition, to serve as a total or partial replacement for tobacco, which gives, on smoking, a low delivery of TPM without having an adverse effect on the taste.

The process according to the invention comprises impregnation of a cellulosic sheet material, preferably paper sheet, with an aqueous solution of a polycarboxylic polymer comprising a carboxylic polysaccharide in the form of sodium alginate, pectinic or pectic acid or like carbohydrate (as an acid or salt), or a polyacrylic acid or a polyacrylic salt.

It has been found that this process markedly reduces the TPM delivery of cigarettes made from the material and that the smoke acridity is modified.

If desired, other substances may be added for modifying smoke and combustion characteristics, for instance, a flame-retarding agent, such as certain sulphates and phosphates of magnesium, aluminium or sodium, for altering the puff number.

Examples of methods for carrying out the invention are as follows:

EXAMPLE 1 A paper sheet of 20g/m was made on a Fourdrinier machine from alpha cellulose pulp. I

A g sample of this sheet was sprayed with ml of an aqueous solution of commercial sodium alginate containing sufficient alginate to give a sheet impregnated with.2% by weight of the alginate. The sample was dried and cut into shreds similar to those of cigarette tobacco. Cigarettes weighing 0.9 g and 70 mm long by 25 mm circumference were made and smoked to a 23 mm butt length using a smoking machine which provided standard conditions of one puff per minute of 2 seconds duration and 35 ml volume. The TPM deliveryof these cigarettes was found to be l4'mg/cigarette at an average of 4.8 puffs compared with 50 mg/cigarette at 9 puffs for a cigarette made of cellulosic material without the addition of sodium alginate.

EXAMPLE 2 Cigarettes were produced as in Example 1, but from paper sheet material containing 5% of the sodium alginate. The TPM delivery was 5 mg/cigarette at an average puff number of 4.5. (The puff number being the number of puffs to smoke the cigarettes to a butt length of 23 mm under the standard conditions described in Example 1).

EXAMPLE 3 Cigarettes were produced as in Example 1, but containing 15% of the sodium alginate. The TPM delivery was 20 mg/cigarette.

EXAMPLE 4 Cigarettes were produced as in Example 1, except that a solution of sodium alginate was prepared by dissolving analytical grade alginic acid in sodium hydroxide to neutrality and diluting the solution so that 10 ml applied to 5 g of the paper sheet gave a sheet containing 2% sodium alginate. The TPM delivery was 8 mg/cigarette.

EXAMPLE 5 The procedure was as in Example 1, except that a commercial low methoxy pectin (pectinic acid) was dissolved and the viscous solution was painted on, using a brush spreader. Cigarettes made from sheet containing 2% pectin had a TPM delivery of 20 mg/cigarette.

EXAMPLE 6 Cigarettes were produced as in Example 1, except that analytical grade 250 pectin was used. The TPM delivery was 20 mg/cigarette.

EXAMPLE 7 Cigarettes were produced as in Example 1, except that a commercial ammonium salt of polyacrylic acid was applied to give a sheet containing 4.6% of this salt. The TPM delivery was 35 mg/cigarette at an average puff number of 9.

EXAMPLE 8 i The sheet material of Example 1 was further treated by adding 5% of sodium phosphate after the application of the sodium alginate. The TPM delivery was reduced to 8 mg/cigarette at an average puff number of 5.0.

EXAMPLE 9 The sheet material of Example 2 was further treated by adding 2% of magnesium sulphate heptahydrate after the application of the sodium alginate. The TPM delivery was 14.5 mg/cigarette at an average puff number of 6.6.

EXAMPLE 10 Example 1 was followed, except that a paper reconstituted tobacco sheet was used instead of the alpha cellulose sheet. The TPM delivery was 24 mg/cigarette compared with 29 mg/cigarette for the untreated sheet. Both kinds of cigarette had the same average puff number.

EXAMPLE 11 tion employed will advantageously be within the approximate range of 0.1% to 20% by weight and preferably within the range of 1% to The TPM delivery was found to range, in comparison with a minimum of 50 mg/cigarette for the untreated sheet material, from 14 mg/cigarette down to 5 mg/cigarette and up to 12.8 mg/cigarette with a progressive increase in the proportion of carboxyl-containing units.

We claim: r

l. A process for manufacturing a smoking composition having a low total particulate matter delivery consisting essentially of:

impregnating an alpha cellulose paper sheet having a density of about 20 grams per square meter with an aqueous solution of a material selected from the group consisting of pectinic acid and sodium algihate to thereby provide a 2% weight gain by impregnation of said sheet on a dry basis; then drying; and thereafter shredding said dried and impregnated sheet to provide filler material for cigarettes. 2. A process according to claim 1, wherein the composition is a non-tobacco composition.

3. A process according to claim 1, wherein the cellulose sheet is reconstituted tobacco.

4. A smoking composition or cigarette containing the same produced by a process according to claim 1.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1961866 *Jun 26, 1931Jun 5, 1934Rooker William AMethod of treating tobacco
US2933420 *Dec 26, 1957Apr 19, 1960Minerals & Chemicals Corp Of ATobacco composition and smoking unit containing material for eliminating deleterious matter
US3003895 *Dec 2, 1958Oct 10, 1961Heinr BorgwaldtTobacco product and method of making the same
US3125098 *Sep 23, 1960Mar 17, 1964 osborne
US3459195 *Jun 16, 1966Aug 5, 1969Philip Morris IncReinforced reconstituted tobacco sheet
US3461879 *Jun 30, 1967Aug 19, 1969Celanese CorpOxidized cellulose tobacco substitute composition
US3529602 *Feb 27, 1969Sep 22, 1970Philip Morris IncTobacco substitute sheet material
US3545448 *Dec 1, 1969Dec 8, 1970Ici LtdProcess for making a modified carbohydrate material for smoking mixtures and the material made thereby
US3638660 *Sep 10, 1968Feb 1, 1972Davis Howard JMethod for making a tobacco substitute composition
BE687507A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4333484 *Aug 2, 1978Jun 8, 1982Philip Morris IncorporatedModified cellulosic smoking material and method for its preparation
US4506684 *Sep 22, 1980Mar 26, 1985Philip Morris IncorporatedPrecipitation of metal salts
US5598868 *Nov 30, 1994Feb 4, 1997R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyCigarette and smokable filler material therefor material for use in smoking articles
Classifications
U.S. Classification131/359
International ClassificationA24B15/16, A24B15/00, C08L1/02, C08L1/00
Cooperative ClassificationD21H5/16, A24B15/16
European ClassificationD21H5/16, A24B15/16