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Publication numberUS3807416 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 30, 1974
Filing dateMay 24, 1972
Priority dateJun 11, 1971
Also published asDE2227832A1
Publication numberUS 3807416 A, US 3807416A, US-A-3807416, US3807416 A, US3807416A
InventorsHedge R, Molyneux D, Nicholl P
Original AssigneeBrown & Williamson Tobacco
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Reconstituted-tobacco smoking materials
US 3807416 A
Abstract
A smoking material comprises a tobacco component consisting of or comprising a combustible reconstituted tobacco, which smoking material contains a filler intimately incorporated therein and consisting solely or largely of zinc-oxide powder. Preferably the reconstituted tobacco consists solely or essentially of natural tobacco substances. The filler of zinc oxide is in powder form and of a particle less than 150 microns and constitutes between approximately 15-40 percent by weight of the tobacco composition. Adhesion of the components is effected by natural tobacco materials released in the slurrying operation.
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United States Patent [191 Hedge et al.

[451 Apr. 30, 1974 RECONSTITUTED-TOBACCO SMOKING MATERIALS [75] Inventors: Roger W. Hedge, Dibden Porlieu;

David J. Molyneux, l-lythe; Peter J. Nicholl, Bassett Wood, all of England [73] Assignee: Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation, Louisville, Ky.

[22] Filed: May 24, 1972 [21 Appl. No.: 256,402

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data June ll, 1971 Great Britain ..27522/7l [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3/1973 Normanetal. ..13l /l7R 12/1966 Mays 131/17 2,809,904 10/1957 Kores 131/2 3,106,210 10/1963 Reynolds et al. 131/17 Primary Examiner-Melvin D. Rein Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow & Garrett [57]. ABSTRACT A smoking material comprises a tobacco component consisting of or comprising a combustible reconstituted tobacco, which smoking 'material contains a filler intimately incorporated therein and consisting solely or largely of zinc-oxide powder. Preferably the reconstituted tobacco consists solely or essentially of natural tobacco substances. The filler of zinc oxide is in powder form and of a particle less than 150 microns and constitutes between approximately 15-40 percent by weight of the tobacco composition. Adhesion of the components is effected by natural tobacco materials released in the slurrying operation.

1 Claim, N0 Drawings RECONSTITUTED-TOBACCO SMOKING MATERIALS This invention concerns improvement relating to reconstituted-tobacco smoking materials.

According to the invention, a smoking material comprises a tobacco component consisting of or comprising a combustible reconstituted tobacco, which smoking material contains a filler intimately incorporated therein and consisting solely or largely of zinc-oxide powder. Preferably the reconstituted tobacco is of a type which consists solely or essentially of natural tobacco substances. Advantageously, the tiller is added to the tobacco component before it is made into web, sheet or filaments and so that the filler becomes incorporated within the fibrous structure of the reconstituted tobacco. The proportion of filler included may be between 0.5 and 50 percent by weight 'of the smoking material and is preferably between 1.0 and 40 percent. The particle size of the zinc-oxide powder is preferably less than 150 microns.

Reconstituted tobaccos of the aforesaid type preferably to be used are characterized essentially by the absence of extraneous adhesives, binding being achieved by substances of, or released from, natural tobacco. Such reconstituted tobaccos are also to be distinguished from those in which the originating material is pulped chemically, usingnitric acid or caustic soda for example.

Reconstituted tobacco may be made without nontobacco adhesive by several known methods:

1. For example, as described in US. Patent Specification No. 3,043,723, reconstituted tobacco may be produced by disintegrating hot-water-extracted tobacco parts, mixing the extracted tobacco parts as binder with tobacco fines such as lamina or midribs, reducing the particle size of the mixture and casting a sheet on a solid band, for example of stainless steel, and evaporating the water.

In this case, zinc-oxide powder can be added together with the tobacco fines to the binder prepared from the water-extracted tobacco parts.

2. Filamentary reconstituted tobacco may be produced by extruding a mixture of water and tobacco parts comminuted to powder form, as described in United States Patent Specification 3,203,432.

The zinc oxide powder can be added to the comminuted tobacco prior to the addition of the water and subsequent extrusion.

3. According to another method, reconstitutedtobacco sheet may be produced by laying a web of fibres, obtained by pulping tobacco material, on a Fourdrinier machine. The web may or may not be impregnated with concentrated aqueous tobacco extract,

% Pressure Total Particulate Matter in Smoke Zno in Drop It] Igur- Sheat ette, mm Watering pct 71/ Reduction Gauge cigarette The reduction in total particulate matter is greater than would be expected from the dilution represented by the content of filler.

An example of the application of the invention to reconstituted tobacco produced by Method (3) will now be described:

Threshed stem from Burley tobacco was cooked three times in successive batches of 10 times its own weight of water at -95C for 30 minutes each. The extracted stem was passed through a disc mill at 16.5 percent consistency, the clearance between plates being 0.035 ins. The consistency was then reduced to 2 percent and the material was beaten for 20 minutes in a conventional Valley beater. The resultant stock was diluted to 0.6 percent consistency and fed, together with finely divided zinc oxide (of a size less than 150 microns) to the headbox of a conventional Fourdrinier paper-making machine of the tissue-paper type. A continuous sheet with a final thickness of 0.13-0.23 mm and a base weight of 40-50g/m was produced. Because of the low degree of retention of the zinc-oxide powder, in relation to the fibrous tobacco material on the Fourdrinier wire, two to three times the quantity of zinc oxide required in the final sheet should be added to the head-box of the machine. The sheet produced was cut at 56 cuts per inch and made into cigarettes. The cigarettes were smoked on a conventional machine at l puff per minute of 35 ml volume and 2 seconds duration and the smoke was collected on a Cambridge Filter. The filter was extracted with methanol and the extract, after filtration, was evaporated off on a water bath. The remaining tar was baked for 16 huts at C. Analysis gave the following results:

Baked Tar in Smok The results show that the reduction in baked tar was considerably greater than would be expected from the dilution represented by the content of filler.

The smoke from cigarettes produced as described above was found to be agreeable.

We claim:

1. The method of reducing the T.P.M. from tobacco smoke to an extent greater than that expected from a tobacco dilution by a non-combustible filler means of equal mass comprising intimately incorporating in a tobacco slurry finely divided ZnO powder of a particle size less than microns, said ZnO constituting approximately l5-40 percent by weight of the tobacco to achieve a tar reduction in an amount up to 64 percent and sheeting the ZnO containing tobacco slurry, the binding being achieved substantially only by substances released from the natural tobacco in slurrying the said tobacco.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2809904 *Nov 17, 1954Oct 15, 1957Raymar CompanySmoking product
US3106210 *Oct 8, 1958Oct 8, 1963Reynolds Metals CoSmoking tobacco
US3292636 *May 4, 1964Dec 20, 1966Union Carbide CorpSmoking tobacco preparation
US3720214 *Dec 3, 1970Mar 13, 1973Liggett & Myers IncSmoking composition
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3893464 *Dec 19, 1973Jul 8, 1975Liggett & Myers IncTobacco composition
US3987801 *Jul 2, 1974Oct 26, 1976Tamag Basel AgSmokeable product with meerschaum particles as absorbents
US6769437Apr 8, 2002Aug 3, 2004Philip Morris IncorporatedUse of oxyhydroxide compounds for reducing carbon monoxide in the mainstream smoke of a cigarette
US6782892Aug 30, 2002Aug 31, 2004Philip Morris Usa Inc.Manganese oxide mixtures in nanoparticle form to lower the amount of carbon monoxide and/or nitric oxide in the mainstream smoke of a cigarette
US7011096Aug 31, 2001Mar 14, 2006Philip Morris Usa Inc.Oxidant/catalyst nanoparticles to reduce carbon monoxide in the mainstream smoke of a cigarette
US7017585Nov 4, 2002Mar 28, 2006Philip Morris Usa Inc.Oxidant/catalyst nanoparticles to reduce tobacco smoke constituents such as carbon monoxide
US7028694Aug 22, 2003Apr 18, 2006Philip Morris Usa Inc.Method for dispersing powder materials in a cigarette rod
US7152609Jun 13, 2003Dec 26, 2006Philip Morris Usa Inc.Catalyst to reduce carbon monoxide and nitric oxide from the mainstream smoke of a cigarette
US7165553Jun 13, 2003Jan 23, 2007Philip Morris Usa Inc.Nanoscale catalyst particles/aluminosilicate to reduce carbon monoxide in the mainstream smoke of a cigarette
US7168431Apr 7, 2003Jan 30, 2007Philip Morris Usa Inc.Partially reduced nanoparticle additives to lower the amount of carbon monoxide and/or nitric oxide in the mainstream smoke of a cigarette
US7228862Feb 23, 2004Jun 12, 2007Philip Morris Usa Inc.Use of oxyhydroxide compounds for reducing carbon monoxide in the mainstream smoke of a cigarette
US7243658Jun 13, 2003Jul 17, 2007Philip Morris Usa Inc.Nanoscale composite catalyst to reduce carbon monoxide in the mainstream smoke of a cigarette
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US7677254Oct 25, 2004Mar 16, 2010Philip Morris Usa Inc.Reduction of carbon monoxide and nitric oxide in smoking articles using iron oxynitride
US7712471Mar 11, 2005May 11, 2010Philip Morris Usa Inc.Methods for forming transition metal oxide clusters and smoking articles comprising transition metal oxide clusters
US7878211Feb 1, 2011Philip Morris Usa Inc.Tobacco powder supported catalyst particles
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US8701681Oct 25, 2004Apr 22, 2014Philip Morris Usa Inc.Use of oxyhydroxide compounds in cigarette paper for reducing carbon monoxide in the mainstream smoke of a cigarette
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US20030131859 *Nov 4, 2002Jul 17, 2003Ping LiOxidant/catalyst nanoparticles to reduce tobacco smoke constituents such as carbon monoxide
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US20040040566 *Aug 30, 2002Mar 4, 2004Ping LiManganese oxide mixtures in nanoparticle form to lower the amount of carbon monoxide and/or nitric oxide in the mainstream smoke of a cigarette
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Classifications
U.S. Classification131/370, 131/309, 131/353
International ClassificationA24B15/28, A24B15/00, A24B15/12
Cooperative ClassificationA24B15/28, A24B15/12
European ClassificationA24B15/12, A24B15/28