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Publication numberUS3807739 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 30, 1974
Filing dateFeb 14, 1972
Priority dateFeb 14, 1972
Publication numberUS 3807739 A, US 3807739A, US-A-3807739, US3807739 A, US3807739A
InventorsF Henley, T Henley, D Townsend
Original AssigneeHh & T Ind
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Board game apparatus
US 3807739 A
Abstract
Apparatus for playing a game including a playing board having a continuous main course divided into a plurality of interconnected segments extending about the periphery of the playing board, a plurality of secondary paths divided into interconnected subsegments projecting inwardly of the board and forming closed loops with the main course at four equally spaced points therealong, the majority of the segments having slots therein and being identified by numbers and colors with no two of the majority of segments having the same number and no two adjacent numbered segments having the same color, others of the segments having specific playing instructions thereon, a first one of the secondary paths having the subsegments thereof labelled with monetary loan values, and second, third and fourth ones of the secondary paths having the subsegments thereof colored in colors corresponding to the colors of the majority of the segments. The game apparatus also includes a plurality of simulated deeds which correspond in identifying numbers and colors to the majority of the segments and include means on opposite faces thereof for identifying the purchase price and rental value thereof, and tabs projecting from one of the faces and receivable in the slots in the segments. Additional apparatus includes a plurality of simulated insurance policies corresponding in color to the colors of the subsegments in the second of the secondary paths, a plurality of simulated stock certificates corresponding in colors to the colors of the subsegments in the third of the secondary paths, and a plurality of blocks representing building stories each including upper and lower faces and a slot in one face thereof, and a tab projecting from the opposite face thereof and receivable in a slot of another block. The game also includes simulated money of different denominations, dice having directions on at least one face thereof directing players about the secondary paths, and playing pieces for traversing the main course and the secondary paths.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Henley et al.

1 1 BOARD GAME APPARATUS [75] Inventors: Terry L. Henley, Xenia; Frederick A. Henley, Centerville, both of Ohio; Donald 1. Townsend, Midland, Mich.

[73] Assignee: H H & T Industries, Dayton, Ohio 22 Filed: Feb. 14, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 226,129

52] us. c1...273 134 AF, 273/ 134 A15, 273/1'34 B, 273/134 c, 273/134 1), 273/134 GM,

Primary ExaminerDelbert B. Lowe Attorney, Agent, or FirmBiebel, French & Bugg [57] ABSTRACT Apparatus for playing a game including a playing board having a continuous main course divided into a plurality of interconnected segments extending about the periphery of the playing board, a plurality of secondary .paths divided into interconnected subsegments [451 Apr. 30, 1974 projecting inwardly of the board and forming closed loops with the main course at four equally spaced points therealong, the majority of the segments having slots therein and being identified by numbers and colors with no two of the majority of segments having the same number and no two adjacent numbered segments having the same color, others of the segments having specific playing instructions thereon, a first one of the secondary paths having the subsegments thereof labelled with monetary loan values, and second, third and fourth ones of the secondary paths having the subsegments thereof colored in colors corresponding to the colors of the majority of the segments. The game apparatus also includes a plurality of simulated deeds which correspond in identifying numbers and colors to the majority of the segments and include means on opposite faces thereof for identifying the purchase price and rental value thereof, and tabs projecting from one of the faces and receivable in the slots in the segments. Additional apparatus includes a plurality of simulated insurance policies corresponding in color'to the colors of the subsegments in the second of the secondary paths, a plurality of simulated stock certificates corresponding in colors to the colors of the subsegments in the third of the secondary paths, and a plurality of blocks representing building stories each including upper and lower faces and a slot in one face thereof, and a tab projecting from the opposite face thereof and receivable in a slot of another block. The game also includes simulated money of different denominations, dice having directions on at least one face thereof directing players about the secondary paths, and playing pieces for traversing the main course and the secondary paths.

10 Claims, 14 Drawing Figures EQUITY PATENTED W I $801,739 SHEU 1 UF 2 I aimvunsmr mamas STOP4 IFENTRV WAS DECLARED FIG-3 FIG-4 BOARD GAME APPARATUS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Games which involve simulated investments, purchases and other business transactions have been the subject of numerous patent applications over the years. For example, US. Pat. No. 748,626 describes one game of thistype called The Landlords Game. One of the most popular games in this general category is the game called Monopoly, described in US. Pat.

-No. 2,026,082. In eachof these patents real estate is sold, purchased, developed and rented in accordance with the rules of the game. In more recent years US Pat. Nos. 2,976,044; 3,163,423; and 3,198,521 have also issued depicting various investment type games.

In games of this general type, of which the above patents are believed exemplary, the primary investment is usually in either real estate or stock certificates. Additionally, particularly in those games in which the emphasis is placed primarily on real estate investment, there is usually some property that is more desirable than the other. Thus, the rentals on certain pieces of real estate may be far in excess of the rentals ascribed to other pieces of real estate and control of select property of this type is often the key to successfully playing the game.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention simulates investment planning and involves aspects of real estate investment, investment'in stock and the purchase of insurance against business losses.

In accordance with a feature of the present invention, the investment value of the various pieces of real estate shifts from one section to another as the game progresses so that one player may not gain control of a select section at an early stage of the game and thereby obtain undue leverage over the remaining players.

The game apparatus includes a playing. board, preferably of rectangular shape, having a continuous main course formed of a series of interconnected segments extending about its periphery. The majority of the segments in the main course are given a specific address, such as a street name and a number, and are also provided with identifying colors, although no two adjacent segments in the main-course are of the same'color.

Adjacent each of the corners of the main course, a secondary path is formed of a series of interconnected subsegments which project inwardly of the board and form a closed loop with the main course. The four secondary paths thus formed are denominated LOANS, INSURANCE, STOCK, and REAL ESTATE.

Each of the colored segments on the main course represents a particular piece of real estate and a deed is associated therewith which shows the purchase price thereof, broken down into the down payment and balance of the purchase price. The deed also indicates the rental value of the lot itself and its rental value as building stories are added thereto.

A plurality of'stackable building stories are used for improving real estate lots, and for convenience in stacking thesestories interconnecting tabs and slots are provided. In this regard, the deeds for the'lots may each be provided with a downwardly projecting tab which engages in a complementary slot in itsassociated segment to position the deed in place at the appropriate location on the board.

Additionally, the deeds are preferably formed of greater area than the segments with which they are associated so that they project outwardly over the edge of the playing board when they are positioned thereon. Thus, when they are pressed at their overhanging position they tilt upwardly at their opposite ends to facilitate grasping the deeds for removal or other handling.

A plurality of stock certificates are used which may be purchased as an investment and which allow a player holding such certificates to obtain revenue from like color pieces of property about the board each time a rental is paid thereon. These certificates may be purchased while traversing the secondary path labelled STOCK and, similarly, insurance policies to protect a player against losses incurred through landing on another players real estate may be purchased while a player is traversing the secondary path entitled INSUR- ANCE;

The real estate itself, and the building stories which may be used for the improvement thereof, are purchased as the players traverse the secondary path labelled REAL ESTATE, while money may be borrowed in certain predetermined amounts during a players movement about the path labelled LOANS.

To mark the progress of the players about the board readily distinguishable playing pieces are provided and simulated money of varying denominations is used to make the various transactions.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a view of a playing board in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a view of a deed used in conjunction with the game;

FIG. 3 is a side view of the deed of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a view of the deed of FIG. 2 showing the opposite' face thereof;

FIG. 5 is a top view of a building story used in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view through the building story of FIG. 5; I

FIG.7 shows a simulated stock certificate;

FIG. 8 shows an insurance policy; a

FIG. 9 is an enlarged view of a portion of the gam apparatus;

FIG. 10 depicts a playing piece,

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of dice used in playing the game of the present invention;

FIG. 12 is a showing of simulated money used in playing the game of the present invention;

FIG. 13 is a side view of the self-service bank; and

FIG. 14 is a plan view thereof.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT With reference initially to FIG. I of the drawings, it will be seen that the playing board 10 in accordance with. the present invention is substantially rectangular in configuration and is provided with a continuous main course 12 extending about its periphery. The main course is comprised of a plurality of interconnected segments 14, each of which is provided with a distinctive color and also with'a distinctive address including a number andpart of a street name.

For example, the first segment proceeding in the direction of the arrows from the corner segment marked START is colored red and its address is RISK Ln. The next segment on the main course is yellow and its address is 12 RISK Ln. The next segment on RISK Ln. is green and its number is 14. As a further example, another street name is DUE Blvd. and the segments on this street are numbered 41, 43, 45, 47 and 49 and are colored orange, tan, red, yellow and blue respectively.

In addition to the colored segments it will be noted that other segments are uncolored and bear directions such as START," Collect $100 Dividend, ONE FREE INSURANCE POLICY, PAYDAY $500 COLLECT AS YOU PASS, LOAN PAYMENT IS DUE. Collect 100 Interest and RETURN IN SURANCE POLICIES. Further uncolored segments are positioned about the main course at the entrance and exit to each of four secondary paths 16, with the entries being labelled STOP IF ENTRY WAS DE- CLARED" and the exits being labelled as much.

Each of the secondary paths 16 is divided up into a plurality of subsegments 18 and it will be noted that the first subsegment encountered in each secondary path is labelled USE ONE DIE WAITING ROOM, The first entry encountered from the start position of the game board is the entry to the secondary path 16 entitled INSURANCE. In this path the remaining segments are either labelled YOUR CHOICE" or are colored one of the six colors appearing about the board, i.e., red, green, yellow, blue, orange, and tan.

The next entry to a secondary path 16 is to that labelled STOCK. Again, as in the case of the INSUR- ANCE secondary path, some of the subsegments 18 thereof are labelled YOUR CHOICE and others are labelled with colors corresponding to the colors used for the segments in the main course. The entrance to the READ ESTATE path is just past 59 LAND Rd. and, again, the subsegments 18 thereof are either labelled YOUR CHOICE or are colored in colors corresponding to the colors used on the segments 14 on the main course.

In the LOANS secondary path, rather than the subsegments 18 thereof being colored to correspond to the colors of the segments in the main course, each of the subsegments is either labelled BAD CREDIT" or is labelled with a particular denomination of money. Finally, a rectangular space is delineated in the center of the playing board labelled SELF SERVICE BANK place bank here.

A plurality of deeds 20 are also used in conjunction with the game, one of which is shown in FIGS. 2 through 4 of the drawings. Each of these deeds is associated with a particular lot on the board and one face thereof, with the exception of the information shown in FIG. '2 of the drawings regarding the down payment and balance relating to the purchase of the lot, is identical to its associated lot in both color, numbering and lettering. The opposite face of the deed bears the number of its corresponding lot and also the rental prices to be charged by a player holding this deed, depending upon the extent to which the lot has been improved with building stories.

Preferably, as will be noted from FIG. 9 of the drawings, the segments of the main'course are provided with slots 22 and each of the deeds 20, as seen in FIGS. 3 and 4, is provided with a complementary tab 24 projecting from one face thereof and receivable in the slots 22 to locate the deeds on the playing board. It will also be noted from FIG. 9 of the drawings that the deeds 20 preferably overhang the edge of the playing board so that by pressing on the overhangng section of the deed its opposite end will tilt up for convenience in removing the deed from the board.

As indicated by the rental schedule appearing on the face of the deed in FIG. 4 of the drawings, each of the lots may be improved by building stories. Each of the stories 28, as seen in FIGS. 5 and 6, is provided with a slot 30 in one face thereof and the complementary tab 32 projecting from its opposite face and receivable in a slot 30 of another building story to facilitate stacking the stories on a particular lot.

Stock certificates are also provided, as seen in FIG. 7 of the drawings, denominated as such and bearing information with regard to their purchase price and investment value, e.g., "Collect 10% Of Each Rent Transaction. Additionally, as seen in FIG. 8 of the drawings, insurance policies, also denominated as such, are provided, each having listed thereon their purchase price and the amount of insurance secured thereby, e.g., Good For One Transaction Up to $1000".

FIG. 12 depicts simulated money which may be used in playing the game and the money, stock certificates and insurance policies may be placed on the self service bank 34 shown in FIGS. 13 and 14 of the drawings. The bank includes a saw-tooth section 36 for receiving the various denominations of money and a second section 38 divided by the partition 40 into a section 42 for the stock certificates, for example, and another section for the insurance policies.

Additionally, each of the players is provided with a distinctive playing piece 46, as shown in FIG. 10 of the drawings, and chance means, such as the dice 48 shown in FIG. 11, are used to determine the number of segments and subsegments to be traversed by each playing piece in one turn. The object of the game is to build the greatest amount of equity in property, stock insurance and cash before the game ends. Upon a person declaring bankruptcy, the game ends and the player with the highest net worth at this time is declared the winner.

To play the game, each of the deeds 20 are placed on their respective lots with the faces thereof showing the downpayment and balance for each. The self service bank is positioned in the center of the board and the money, stock certificates and insurance policies are placed thereon. Preferably, one of the players is appointed loan officer to account for all money borrowed during the course of the game in a manner to be described below, although it will be apparent that each person may be held accountable for his'own transactions.

Regardless of this, each player is assigned a playing piece, such as the piece 46, which is played at the START segment on the main course of the playing board and given some predetermined amount of money, e.g., $2000, to start the game. The order in which the players proceed may be determined in any satisfactory manner, such as by throwing the dice 48, and the first player so determined may then start. Each player then rolls the dice and moves his playing piece in a clockwise direction about the board the total number of segments about the main course indicated on the dice.

A player may purchase any unpurchased property his playing piece lands on by making the down payment listed on the front of the deed associated with that particular piece of property. After making payment to the bank the property is removed from the board and placed face up with the rental schedule showing and this property may be designated In Hock.

Preferably, a limit may be set on the number of pieces of property a player may have in hock at one time. For example, a limit of five pieces might be set after which a player can purchase no additional pieces until the number of pieces in hock has been reduced by paying the balance of the purchase price as described in detail below.

In order to pay the balance of the purchase price a player must enter the secondary path 16 labelled REAL ESTATE. Entry into this secondary path, and

any of the other secondary paths, must be made by a player announcing his intention to do so when his playing piece moves to within a distance to the entrance of any secondary path which may be covered with a single throw of the dice. If a player so announces his intention and the total amount shown on the dice after he throws them will not move him a sufficient distance to reach the segment labelled STOP IF ENTRY WAS DE- CLARED, he must, on his next turn, if he still desires entry, redeclare his intention to enter in order to be able to enter on that turn.

After stopping at the entrance to the secondary path he may not enter until some appropriate legend such as ENTER WAITING ROOM appears on one or both of the dice during a normal turn. After entering the waiting room the player may use only one die to proceed around the secondary path and shall continue to use one die until he is back on the main course 12.

In order to prevent a player who, for example, might be low on funds and desires to avoid landing on rental property owned by other players, from, in effect, stagnating, by merely continuously traversing the same secondary path and thereby prolonging the game, a limit should be set on the number of times a player may traverse a particular secondary path in succession. As a practical matter it has been found that by limiting travel around a particular secondary path to two trips and then requiring the player to travel around the board at least one more time before reentering that particular secondary path, the game moves at the desired tempo.

Upon entering the REAL ESTATE secondary path the player may pay thebalance due on any piece of property which he at that time has in hock if his playing piece lands upon a subsegment having thesame color as the color of the piece of property the player has in hock. If the playerss playing piece lands on a segment labelled YOUR CHOICE" the balance may be paid in any single piece of property he holds, although, in any case, only one piece of property may be drawn out of hock at each turn. Once the balance has been paid the deed is turned over with the opposite face up, showing the rentals to be paid -by the other players if they land upon that particular piece of property.

Once a player has at least one piece of property completely paid for he may build on that property by purchasing building stories at some predetermined amount as he proceeds around the REAL ESTATE secondary path. Thus, if a player either has all of his property paid for or some of it and decides that he would rather build upon a paid up piece of property than pay the balance on another piece he holds, he may purchase one story for any completely purchased piece of property of the color upon which his playing piece lands. If desired, the building stories may be in the same colors as the playing pieces to serve to identify particular buildings with a particular playing piece.

Entry may be made to the LOANS path in the manner described above if a player decides to borrow money. After entering a player may borrow the total amount shown on the subsegment his playing piece lands on. The money is obtained from the bank and the transaction recorded by the loan officer, if one is appointed. As the player leaves the LOANS path he makes a loan payment in an amount indicated by some predetermined loan payment schedule which, as shown in FIG. 1 of the drawings, may be indicated conveniently at the LOAN secondary path. This amount is subtracted from the total borrowed.

Thereafter, whenever the player passes over the segment marked LOAN PAYMENT IS DUE he makes a payment on his debt in the amount indicated by the loan schedule and this amount is subtracted from the balance of his debt. Of course, if in traveling around the LOANS secondary path his playing piece lands on a subsegment labelled BAD CREDIT, the player is not entitled to a loan.

In order to defray the expense of landing on another players rental property, a player may purchase IN- SURANCE, while traveling around the secondary path so labelled. Entry to the INSURANCE secondary path is in the same manner as described above, and if a playing piece upon a colored subsegment, insurance for all lots on the main course of the same color may be purchased for some predetermined purchase price.

The insurance policy will cover one rent payment up to some fixed amount, regardless of the actual amount of rent due. For example, the cost of an insurance policy might be $400, with each policy covering one rent payment up to $1,000 on property of that color only. The policy would be good for only one transaction, whether the rent due was $250 or $1,500 with any rent payment in excess of $1,000 to be paid out of the player's cash reserve or by another insurance policy. Of course, if a playing piece lands on the subsegment labelled YOUR CHOICE the player has a choice as to which color policy he wishes to purchase.

In either case, the player owning the property receives that portion of the rent covered by the policy from the bank and the policy is then returned to the bank. Additionally, each policy is good for. only one trip around the board and all unused policies are returned to the bank each time the segment adjacent the exit to the insurance secondary path labelled RE- TURN INSURANCE POLICIES is reached.

In order to secure a return on property owned by other players a player may purchase STOCK as he traverses the secondary path so labelled. If a piece lands upon a coloredsubsegmenta stock certificate of that color may be purchased, entitling the player to a payment from the bank of an amount equal to some predetermined percentage of the rents collected by players holding property of that same color.

For example, a red stock certificate might be purchased for $1,000 entitling the owner thereof to collect from the bank an amount equal to 20 percent of any rents collected on properties of the same color. A number of certificates of the same color may be purchased, preferably up to some predetermined limit, such as percent, with the certificates being good for the entire game.

If a player cannot pay the entire amount of a rental payment or complete a loan payment out of his cash reserves he must sell any assets he owns, such as building stories, property, insurance and stock, to the bank for some percentage of the original purchase price. For example, a cash-in value may be set at 20 percent of the original purchase price with a player first cashing in stories on a property, followed by cashing in the balance payment, which would cause the property to be again placed in hock, followed by cashing in the down payment, which would require the deed to be returned to the board.

If after cashing in all of his assets a player still lacks funds to meet an obligation, he must declare bankruptcy, thus ending the game. At this time each of the other players totals up his cash and the purchase price of each of his assets and the player having the highest total dollar value is declared the winner.

From the above it will be seen that the present invention provides a game which parallels actual business planning and which includes elements of borrowing, dealing in stock and real estate, real estate development and insurance. Because the emphasis on particular transactions, such as borrowing, buying real estate, developing real estate, buying insurance and investing in stock, shifts as the game proceeds and the players accumulate'assets, the value of the real estate adjacent each of the secondary paths associated with these transactions also shifts, since the players tend to land on these properties more frequently at that time than on the others.

For example, at an early stage of the game the emphasis may be on purchasing real estate. As a result, the,

portion of the main course interconnecting the entry and exit to the REAL ESTATE secondary path would be more frequently travelled than the rest of the board and ownership of segments 50, 52, 54, 55, 57 and 59 LAND Rd. would probably be more desirable at that time than ownership of other segments. Thus, the location of the most desirable real estate shifts about the board as the game progresses, preventing one player from, by chance, obtaining the most select property at the outset of the game and thereby gaining an undue advantage over the others.

.While the form of the invention herein described constitutes a preferred embodiment of the invention, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to this precise form, and that changes may be made therein without departing from the scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. Apparatus for playing a game comprising:

a. a playing board including:

i. a continuous main course extending about the surface of said board,

ii. means dividing said main course into a plurality of interconnected segments,

iii. means associated with the majority of said segments for identifying said segments and the purchase price and rental value thereof,

iv. a plurality of secondary paths each forming a closed loop with said main course at spaced intervals therealong,

v. means dividing each of said secondary paths into a plurality of interconnected subsegments,

vi. means associated with said subsegments in one of said secondary paths assigning monetary values thereto,

vii. means associated with said subsegments in another of said secondary paths relating them to segments in said main course,

b. a plurality of simulated deeds each associated with a particular one of said segments and identifying the down payment and balance of the purchase price thereof on one face, and the rental value thereof on the opposite face, said one face, with the exception of the purchase information thereon, being identical to the segment with which it is associated,

c. playing pieces for traversing said main course and secondary paths, and

(1. chance means operable by players of said game apparatus for determining the number of segments and subsegments to be traversed by a playing piece in one turn.

2. The apparatus of claim 1 further comprising:

a. a slot in each of said majority of said segments, and

b. tabs projecting from said opposite faces and said deeds receivable in said slots.

3. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein:

a. each of said majority of said segments are colored,

and

b. a plurality of simulated stock certificates is provided with said stock certificates corresponding in color to the colors of said majority of said segments.

4. The apparatus of claim 3 wherein:

a. no two adjacent segments of said majority of segments are the same color.

5. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein:

a. each of said majority of said segments are colored,

and

b. a plurality of simulated insurance policies is provided having colors corresponding to the colors of said majority of said segments.

6. The apparatus of claim 5 wherein:

a. no two adjacent segments of said majority of segments are the same color.

7. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said chance means comprises:

a. a plurality of dice having indicia on the faces thereof for indicating the number of segments and subsegments to be traversed by a playing piece, and

b. directions on at least one face thereof directing said playing piece about said secondary paths.

8. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein:

a. each of said deeds is longer than the width of each of said segments measured in a direction normal to the direction of said main course, whereby outer edges of said deeds overhang said periphery of said playing board when inner edges of said deeds are aligned with corresponding inner edges of said segments.

9. Apparatus for playing a game comprising:

a. a playing board comprising:

i. a continuous main course divided into a plurality of interconnected segments extending about the periphery of said playing board,

ii. a plurality of secondary paths divided into interconnected subsegments projecting inwardly of said board and forming closed loops with said main course at four equally spaced points therealong,

iii. the majority of said segments having slots therein and being identified by numbers and colors and no two of said majority of segments having the same number and no two adjacent numbered segments having the same color,

iv. others of said segments having specific playing instructions thereon,

v. a first one of said secondary paths having the subsegments thereof labelled with monetary loan values, and

vi. second, third and fourth ones of said secondary paths having the subsegments thereof colored in colors corresponding to the colors of said majority of said segments,

b. a plurality of simulated deeds corresponding in identifying numbers and colors to said majority of said segments and including:

i. means on opposite faces thereof for identifying the purchase price and rental value thereof, and

ii. a tab projecting from the opposite face thereof and receivable in a said slot of another block, f. simulated money of different denominations, g. dice means having directions on at least one face thereof directing players about said secondary paths, and

h. playing pieces for traversing said main course and said secondary paths.

10. Apparatus for playing a game comprising:

a. a playing board including:

i. a continous main course extending about the surface of said board,

ii. means dividing said main course into a plurality of interconnected segments,

iii. means associated with the majority of said segments for identifying said segments and the purchase price and rental value thereof,

iv. a plurality of secondary paths each forming a closed loop with said main course at spaced intervals therealong,

v. means dividing each of said secondary paths into a plurality of interconnected subsegments,

vi. means associated with said subsegments in one of said secondary paths assigning monetary values thereto, I

vii. means associated with said subsegments in another of said secondary paths relating them to segments in said main course,

b. playing pieces for traversing said main course and secondary paths,

c. chance means operable by players of said game apparatus for determining the number of segments and subsegments to be traversed by a playing piece in one turn,

d. a plurality of blocks representing house stories having opposite, upper and lower faces,

e. a slot in one of said faces, and

f. a tab projecting from the opposite of said faces and receivable in the slot of another of said house stol'leS.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification273/256, 273/282.1, 273/290, 273/148.00R
International ClassificationA63F11/00, A63F3/00, A63F9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00006, A63F3/00072, A63F11/0002
European ClassificationA63F3/00A6F, A63F11/00C