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Publication numberUS3808768 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 7, 1974
Filing dateJul 12, 1972
Priority dateJul 12, 1972
Publication numberUS 3808768 A, US 3808768A, US-A-3808768, US3808768 A, US3808768A
InventorsW Dobbs
Original AssigneeW Dobbs
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for manufacturing stuffed and sealed mailing packages
US 3808768 A
Abstract
A method and apparatus is herein described for manufacturing stuffed and sealed mailing envelopes wherein a printed continuous web is slit into continuous ribbons. A first ribbon is cut, trimmed, glued and folded to form a mailing envelope, a second ribbon may be cut, trimmed, glued and folded to form a return envelope and one or more additional ribbons may be cut, trimmed and folded to form the insertable sheets. The return envelope and inserts feed through the apparatus in synchronism and are folded, cut, trimmed and are otherwise treated in unison for marriage to the mailing envelope ribbon, in a partially folded condition. The combined package of return envelope, inserts and mailing envelope ribbon then feed together to cutter and tucker cylinders wherein the mailing envelope ribbon is cut and folded once and wherein a second fold is applied to all of the insertable material. The mailing envelope is then trimmed and the final fold is applied for envelope closing purposes.
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United States Patent [191 Dobbs [451 May 7,1974

[ METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MANUFACTURING STUFFED AND SEALED MAILING PACKAGES [76] Inventor: Wallace C. Dobbs, 33 W. 7th Ave.,

Runnemede, NJ. 08078 [22] Filed: July 12, 1972 [211 Appl. No.: 270,919

[52] US. Cl. 53/31, 53/206, 93/63 R,

270/41, 270/43 [51] Int. Cl B651) 11/50 [58] Field of Search 53/23, 31, 32, 123, 203,

53/206; 93/61 R, 62 R, 63 R, 63 M; 270/5, 6, 7, 8, 9,10,11, 41, 42, 43, 44

Primary Examiner-Travis S. McGehee Assistant Examiner-J. Sipos Attorney, Agent, or FirmSperry and Zoda 57 ABSTRACT A method and apparatus is herein described for manufacturing stuffed and sealed mailing envelopes wherein a printed continuous web is slit into continuous ribbons. A first ribbon is cut, trimmed, glued and folded to form a mailing envelope, a second ribbon may be cut, trimmed, glued and folded to form a return envelope and one or more additional ribbons may be cut, trimmed and folded to form the insertable sheets. The return envelope and inserts feed through the apparatus in synchronism and are folded, cut, trimmed and are otherwise treated in unison for marriage to the mailing envelope ribbon, in a partially folded condition. The combined package of return envelope, inserts and mailing envelope ribbon then feed together to cutter and tucker cylinders wherein the mailing envelope ribbon is cut and folded once and wherein a second fold is applied to all of the insertable material. The mailing envelope is then trimmed and the final fold is applied for envelope closing purposes.

The envelope may be of the window envelope variety or may be a plain envelope for use in conjunction with an automatic addressing machine which is employed to label each package automatically following manufacture within the apparatus.

Claims, 13 Drawing Figures METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MANUFACTURING STUFFED AND SEALED MAILING PACKAGES BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates, in general, to the printing art, and more specifically, is directed to apparatus for use with rotary web printing machines for the mass production of stuffed and sealed pieces of commercial mail, in an automatic, continuous, in-line and rapid manner.

The apparatus, according to the present invention, is particularly suitable for use in conjunction with continuous web printing apparatus, commonly termed web presses. It is the present practice to employ folding apparatus in conjunction with web printing presses for the production of such printed material as newspaper, advertisements, magazines, mailing leaflets and the like. It is the usual practice to print such material continuously upon an elongate web, to continuously slit the running web to form ribbons of desired page size, to

fold the ribbons over a former and then to cut, trim,

manufacture the desired end product. In many instances, such as in the case of mailers, it is also common practice to provide a return envelope either by stapling or by gluing a separate return envelope to the printed pages during the folding and trimming processes.

In the production and four and eight page signatures, multi-fold advertisements and variousother products suitable for either insertion in newspapers or magazines or in direct mailing, most .prior workers in the field have utilized techniques which include printing a continuous web on a web press, slitting and cutting the printed material to the desired size, folding the pages on formers and, by employing jaw and tucker cylinders, trimming, adding insertable material and then folding to the final size. In the case of mailing materials, it is usual to stuff the insertable material into a previously manufactured mailer to produce the final product.

In producing the finished product, it has previously been necessary to employ many hand operations and manual functions to arrive at the end product. Quite often, sheets are piled onto skids at the press and, then, these must be transported to a cutter for trimming and cutting the printed material into sections. The cut sections are then taken to a bindery wherein folding and packing operations are performed. A return envelope, if required, is then inserted into the folded material.

The folded material with inserts affixed then had to be shipped to a mailing and inserting house wherein the printed matter was inserted into the mailing envelopes and the mailing labels were affixed. All of the transporting and additional handling operations resulted in increased production costs and in considerable loss of valuable time between the press and the final recipient.

Therefore it would be a technical advance, in the art, if a method and apparatus were provided for manufacturing a completed mailing product from a roll of paper and, thus, eliminating many of the costly steps, currently considered to be necessary.

OBJECTS AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide an improved method and apparatus for manufacturing stuffed and sealed mailing brochures.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a methodand apparatus for rapidly printing, folding and sealing a mailing envelope having insertable material contained therein.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a method and apparatus for manufacturing mailing brochures in which a mailing envelope is produced having printed inserts therein, and one of said inserts being a return envelope.

It is still another object of the present invention to provide a method and apparatus for manufacturing and mailing brochures from'a continuous printed web including automatic steps of slitting the web into a plurality of ribbons, folding, cutting and gluing one said ribbon, as necessary, to provide a mailing envelope and cutting, gluing and folding the remaining ribbons as necessary to provide insertable material within the envelope, one of said inserts being a return mailing envelope.

It is still yet another object of the present invention to provide a method and apparatus for manufacturing mailing brochures including cutting and folding cylinders which are adaptable for in-line production of mailing envelopes continuously with printed material inserted therein.

It is a further object of the present invention toprovide a method and apparatus for manufacturing mailing brochures which includes web cutting and folding means suitable to obtain end products which do not require further finishing operations.

It is yet a further object of the present invention to provide a method and apparatus for producing stuffed and sealed mailing brochures which apparatus includes automatic envelope forming apparatus, automatic brochure forming apparatus and automatic labeling apparatus, the mailing envelope apparatus and the brochure manufacturing apparatus cooperating to simultaneously fold the brochures within the envelope during the manufacturing process.

It is still a further object of the. present invention to provide a method and apparatus for manufacturing mailing brochures and envelopes which apparatus is continuous in operation, rapid in production and trouble-free upon use.

It is a major object of the present invention to provide a synergistic methodand apparatus for manufacturing completely stuffed and sealed packages of commercial mail, from a printed. web, which method and apparatus obviates many of the steps which are currently considered, bythose working in the art,'to be necessary.

At least some of the above-cited objects are achieved by the provision of a method and apparatus wherein a first folder is operable to impress a first fold in an insert sheet. A transfer mechanism is provided for superimposing the insert sheet onto'a package blank. A second folder is provided for imposing a first fold in the package blank and a third folder is provided for impressing a second fold in the package blank, which second fold may define a flap member. The result of the intercooperation of the various elements, mentioned above is the production of a folded insert, completely enclosed within a folded package.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF- THE DRAWINGS Other objects and a fuller understanding of the invention will be had by referring to the following detailed description of a preferred embodiment, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein like reference characters refer to similar parts throughout the several views in which:

FIG. 1 is a schematic perspective view of apparatus according to the present invention, showing a printed web as it is slit and directed over a former;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a segment of the printed web which has been longitudinally slit to form four continuous ribbons; FIG. 3 is a perspective view, similar to FIG. 2, showing proposed fold lines and gum strip outlines in dotted lines;

FIG. 4 is a perspective, exploded view of the ribbons of FIG. 3, as arranged for travel through the apparatus;

FIG. 6B is a view, similar to FIG. 6A, showing further development of the first fold;

FIG. 6C is an enlarged view, similar to FIG. 6A, showing the completion of the first fold;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged, schematic, side elevational view showing the development of second fold of the superimposed blanks and the first fold of the envelope ribbon;

FIG. 8 is a schematic side elevational view, showing the completion of the second fold in the three superimposed blanks and the first fold in the mailing envelope;

FIG. 9 shows the development of the final fold in the mailing envelope;

FIG. I0 is a perspective view, showing one side of the final package; and

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of the reverse side of the package of FIG. 10, showing a mailing label affixed.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF A PREFERRED EMBODIMENT OF THE INVENTION Although specific terms are used inthe following description for the sake of clarity, these terms are intended to refer only to the particular structure of my inventiomselected for illustration in the drawings, and are not intended to define or limit the scope of the invention.

Referring now to the drawings, I show in FIG. 1 a continuous web 10 of sheet material, which has been printed in a conventional manner, such as by a web press (not shown), as it is introduced to the apparatus of this invention.

The continuous web I0 is fed past a plurality of spaced rotary slitter rolls I2, l4, l6 and is slit into four continuous ribbons; for example, a first insertion ribbon 18, a second insertion ribbon 20, a return envelope ribbon 22 and a mailing envelope ribbon 24. In the case of the envelope ribbons 22, 24, it is desirable to provide gum strips for later moistening and sealing, as hereinafter more fully set forth. Accordingly, glue stations,

which may be in the form of conventional pattern gluers (not shown) are associated with the return envelope ribbon 22 and the mailing envelope ribbon 24 in a well known manner and in suitable location to apply the glue strips for envelope forming purposes.

The ribbons 18, 20, 22 are superimposed by feeding the ribbons over turning assemblies. Each turning assembly, for example, may be comprised of mutually perpendicular first and second turning bars 26, 28, respectively, and a third turning bar 30. Each turning bar 26, 28 is disposed at a 45 angle to the longitudinal axis of its respective associated ribbon. The third turning bar 30 is substantially parallel to the axis of its respective ribbon (FIG. 1). i

The turning assemblies function to'superimpose the ribbons 18, 20, 22 in longitudinally aligned relation' where they. are married at the marriage roller 32 to form superimposed insert ribbons 34. The superimposed ins'ert ribbons 34are fed over a former 36, of conventional design, which has a nose section aligned with a elongate nip, defined between driven former rollers 38, 40. The superimposed insert ribbons 34 are fed into the apparatus through perforating rollers 42, 44 to be perforated and then turned about a turnabout roller 46, for entrance into a folding apparatus 48 of the present invention. If desired, a tensioning roll 50 may be employed, in conventional manner, to direct the superimposed ribbons 34 to the nip defined between moistening rolls 52, 54, as hereinafter more fully set forth.

Referring now to FIG. 2, I show a transverse segment of the web 10 which has been longitudinally slit at the slitter rolls 12, l4, 16 to form a first insertion ribbon 18, a second insertion ribbon 20, a return envelope ribbon 22 and amailing package, or envelope ribbon 24. In the embodiment illustrated, the invention will be described in conjuction with a standard 35 inch wide web 10. However, all of the principles herein discussed will be equally applicable to webs of other width sizes and more or fewer continuous ribbons 18, 20, 22, 24 may be formed as desired in accordance with the final end product desired to be manufactured. Additionally, for example, more or fewer return envelopes or insertable brochures could be manufactured by utilizing the principles herein set forth. The combination of two insertable brochures, one return envelope and one mailing envelope will be hereinafter described indetail as being illustrative of the process and apparatus but, the invention should not be considered as being limited thereto. By utilizing the teachings of the present invention, those skilled in the art may readily vary the teachings herein as necessary to produce the desired end product. I

As illustrated in FIG. 3, the ribbons 18, 20, 22, 24 will be transversely cut by the apparatus, along the transverse lines 56, 58, to form individual blanks or sheets 60, 62, 64, 66 which may be of any practical size, e.g. l 1 inches in height to conform to standard letter size. The insert sheets 60, 62 may be any practical size, e.g., 8 or 8% inches in width to conform also to conventional letter size in the second dimension. The return envelope blank 64 may be of any practical size, e.g., 8% inches or 8% inches in width to accomodate the width of the material which will be inserted when employing the blank 64 as a return envelope. Similarly, the mailing envelope 66 may be of any practical size, e.g., approximately 9% inches in width to conveniently as illustrated herein.

Still referring to FIG. 3, the apparatus herein employed will be utilized in conjunction with the first insertion blank 60 to cut the trailing edge 68, trim the leading edge 70, to form the first fold 72 and to form the second fold 74. Similarly, the second insertion blank 62 is cut at the trailing edge 76 and is trimmed at the leading edge 78. As hereinafter more fully described, the first fold 80 and the second fold 82 are formed simultaneously with the respective folds 72, 74, of the insertion blank 60.

If found necessary, the blank 62 may be longitudinally trimmed along one transverse edge 84 for bleeds if required. With regard to the return envelope blank 64, the apparatus cuts the trailing edge 86 and trims the leading edge 88. The first fold 90 is simultaneously formed with the other first folds 72 and 80. The'second fold 92 is simultaneously formed with the other second folds 74, 82 of the respective first and second insert blanks 60 and 62. If the blank 64 is to be utilized as a return envelope, transversely spaced glue strips 94, 96 and a flap glue strip 98 may be affixed in conventional manner, such as by employing a pattern g'luer (not shown) of known design to the running web, either prior to or after the web passes the-slitter rolls 12, 14, 16. If desired, the envelope flap 100 may be perforated at 102 to provide a removable strip 104 which may be utilized as a customer receipt, a guarantee, or the like.

The mailing package or envelope blank 66 is cut at the trailing edge 106 and has the waste section 108 removed along the trim line 110. The envelope blank is fed separately into the apparatus and has its first fold 112 formed simultaneously with the second folds 74, 82, 92 of the respective blanks 60, 62, 64. The second fold 114 is formed to contain the folded blanks 60, 62, 64 within the mailing envelope by defining the flap 116 thereof. Transverse glue strips 118, 120, and the flap glue strip 122 are provided in well known manner, either before or after the web engages the slitter rolls 12,14, 16, by employing conventional gluing apparatus, such as a pattern glue station (not shown) in well known manner.

Referring now to FIGS. 4 and 5, the superimposed insert ribbons 34 feed into the folding apparatus 48 through the moistening rolls 52, 54 which may be employed to activate the glue strips 94, 96 of the return envelope ribbon 22. Preferably, the moisteners 52, 54 moisten the transverse'edges 124, 126 which serve to activate the glue strips 94, 96 after the first fold 90 is completed. Of course, other adhesives, which may be reactivated by infra-red, ultra-violet, heat, ultrasonics, laser beam, etc; may also be used.

Referring now to FIGS. 6A, 6B, 6C, the superimposed ribbons 34 feed to a tangentially operative cutter and tucker cylinder 128 and a jaw and anvil cutter cylinder 130. The pins 132 of the cutter and tucker cylinder 128 engage the ribbon 34 at the perforations (not shown) impressed by the cylinders42, 44 and act to pull the leading edge 134 of the superimposed ribbons 34 about the cutter and tucker cylinder 128 to the position of FIG. 6A.

The cooperating tucker 136 of the cylinder 128 and jaw 138 of the cylinder tangentially interact to initiate the first fold 140 of the ribbon 34 which takes place at the last third of the sheets to form the individual folds 72, 80, 90. With the superimposed sheets held within the jaw 138, the cylinders 128, 130 continuerotation in the direction of the arrows until the cutter 142 and anvil 144 interact to cut the ribbon 34 at the trailing edges 68, 76, 86 of the respective blanks 60, 62, 64. (see FIG. 6B).

Continued rotation of the cylinders 128, 130 in the direction of the arrows further forms the first fold 140 and the jaw 138 continues to grasp the superimposed blanks 60, 62, 64. As seen in FIGS. 5 and 6C, the pins 132 release the leading edge 134 to permit rotation of the cut sheets about the cylinder 130. After the ribbon 34 is severed by action of the cutter I42, associated pins 132 engage the newly severed edge to pull the ribbon 34 about the cylinder 128 to automatically repeat the operation.

As shown in FIGS. 68 and 6C, continued rotation of the cylinder 130 completes the first fold 140. The door and anvil cutter cylinder 130 tangentially engages the trimming cylinder.l 46 wherein trimming cutters 148 cooperate with the anvils 144 to trim the leading edges 70, 78, 88 of the sheets 60, 62, 64. The jaw 138 continues to hold the superimposed blanks at the first-fold 140 thereof after the trimming operation and rotates into tangential contact with the transfer cylinder 150 (see FIG. 5). A trim exhaust chute 152 of conventional design receives the waste from the trimming cylinder 146 and delivers the waste material to a point of disposal in conventional manner.

The transfer cylinder 150 rotates in the direction indicated by the arrow and grasps the first fold 140 within the jaw 154 to rotate the once folded material to the cutter and tucker cylinder 158. The jaw 156 transfers the once folded sheets 60, 62, 64 to the cylinder 158 for marriage with the mailing envelope ribbon 24. R0- tation of the cutter and tucker cylinder 158 in the direction indicated by the arrow pulls the single folded sheets 60, 62, 64' to a position superimposed on the package or envelope ribbon 24.

Referring now to FIGS. 1 and 5, the mailing package or envelope ribbon 24 enters the folding apparatus 48, about the turnabout roller 60. Although the conventional chopper folder 162 need not be utilized in the present invention, it need not be removed from the existing. apparatus in order to practice the operations herein set forth.

The mailing package or envelope ribbon 24 passes between the moisturizing rollers 166, 168 to moisten the transverse areas 170, 172 adjacent to the glue strips 118, 120 to activate the glue for envelope sealing purposes when the ribbon 24 is cut and folded as hereinafter more fully set forth.

The ribbon 24 then travels between the cutter and tucker cylinder 158 and the jaw, tucker and anvil cylinder 174 wherein the leading edge is engaged by the pins 176 to pull the leading edge of the ribbon 24 about the cylinder 158. (see FIG. 7). I

Simultaneously, the once foldedsheets 60, 62, and 64, which were transferred to the jaw 156, at the first fold 140 thereof, by the transfer cylinder 150, are superimposed over the ribbon 24 in precise position to align the respective second folds 74, 82, 92 of the sheets 60, 62, 64 over the first fold 112 of the envelope blank 66, as in FIG. 7. The jaw 178 of the cylinder 174 cooperates with the tucker 180 of the cylinder 158 to form the first-fold 112 in the envelope blank 66 and the second folds 74, 82, 92 of the blanks 60, 62, 64. Rotation of the cylinders 158, 174 with the sheets held by the jaw 178 in the direction indicated by'the arrows rotates the cutter 182 into tangential engagement with the anvil 184 to cut the web 24.

As illustrated in FIG. 8, the jaw 178 of the cylinder 174 pulls the once folded envelope blank 66 and the twice folded insert blanks 60, 62, 64, which are interfolded therein, to the tangentially positioned trimming cylinder 186 wherein the tucker 188 cooperates with the anvil 190 to trim off the front waste section 108.

The waste material exits the equipment through a conventional trash waste chute 192.

The trimmed final product is then carried by the cylinder 174 to the jaw cylinder 194 wherein the jaw 196 forms the second fold 114 on the mailing envelope blank 66. It will be remembered that the moisturizers 166, 168 may be provided to moisturize suitable areas of the envelope blank 66 and accordingly, upon impressing the second fold 114, the package will be sealed by activation of the flap glue strip 122. The jaw cylinder 194 rotatesin the direction indicated by the arrow and deposits the finished product 198 upon the surface of the moving belt 200' for delivery to a desired area. Sufficient pressure is applied between the periphery of the jaw cylinder 194 and the top of the moving belt 200 to insure complete sealing of the flap 116. (see FIG. 9).

FIG. is illustrative of a sealed side of the finished product 198 showing the flap 116 glued in position with all of the insertable material enclosed therewithin. FIG. 11 shows the address side of the finished product 198 wherein a mailing label 202 has been automatically applied to the finished product by an automatic label machine (not shown) in conventional manner.

It will be noted that such products as cover folds, letter folds, envelopes, four-page digests and sheeting can all be made by using the cylinders 128,130, 146, 150, 158 and 174 alone wherein the product could be delivered by the cylinder 174 upon a belt 204 for delivery to the shipping area. In practice, this could be an initial installation, with provisions for adding cylinders 186 and 194 at a later time. These folds can be made by workers skilled in the art simply by re-timing of the jaws and the cylinders in accordance with well known principles of folder operation. With some products, there is only one folding operation needed and accordingly, these could be fed directly to the belt 204 following completion of the necessary folding operations. In the case of large billing firms where it is desired to also include sales literature and return envelopes, a window envelope could be manufactured as the outside envelope to expose the customers name and address that is printed on the billing. The billing would be automatically fed into the folding apparatus 48 from fan folded carton of billing from computers to eliminate a separate inserting operation as is now the common practice.

ADVANTAGES It can thus be seen that a method and apparatus is described herein for providing a mailing package that is completely manufactured, from a web of printed material, to a completed mailing product which is ready for delivery to the post office. Accordingly, many of the separate and costly steps and functions, which heretofore have been considered necessary by those working in the art, have been obviated.

More specifically, the following steps and functions have been rendered unnecessary:

1. Printing and cutting the printed matter into sheets;

2. Transferring the product to a cutter (a bindery subdivision);

3. Transferring the cut product to a folder, where it is folded and wrapped;

4. Shipping the various printed and folded products to an inserting and mailing house;

5. Manufacturing and delivery of mailing and return envelopes which are normally printed and manufactured, separately, at an envelope manufacturing company;

6. The application of mailing labels to the envelopes at a mailing house; and

7. The stuffing of the inserts into the mailingenvelope.

Since the system and method, according to'present invention, integrates all the above, separately performed, functions into one in-line apparatus; a finished, stuffed and sealed mailing package may be manufactured at a cost savings which is substantial.

SCOPE OF THE INVENTION While what has been described herein is a preferred embodiment of the present invention, it is of course to be understood that various modifications and changes may be made therein, without departing from the invention.

Accordingly, it is intended to cover in the following claims all such modifications and changes as may fall 7 within the true spirit and scope of the present invention.

What I claim is:

1. Apparatus for manufacturing a folded package containing at least one folded sheet: said apparatus comprising in combination first folding means;

means for advancing an insert web presenting a plurality of insert sheets inside-by-side relation toward said first folding means;

second folding means;

means for advancing a package web presenting a plurality of package blanks in side-by-side relation toward said second folding means;

slitting means for slitting the insert web to form a first ribbon of insert sheets and for slitting said package web to form a second ribbon of package blanks; first ribbon cutting means for transversely cutting the first ribbon'to form discrete insert sheets; second ribbon cutting means for transversely cutting the second ribbon into discrete package blanks, said first folding means being operable to impress a first fold in an insert sheet; transfer means for superimposing a folded insert sheet onto a package blank; said second folding means being operable to impress a first fold in the package blank with the insert superimposed thereon; and third folding means for impressing a second fold in the package blank to completely enclose the folded insert disposed within the package blank to form a package.

2. Apparatus according to claim 1, wherein:

said second folding means is operable to simultaneously impress a second fold in the once folded, insert sheet while imposing the first fold in the package blank.

3. Apparatus according to claim 1, wherein the web includes the package blanks and a plurality of side-byside insert sheets:

said slitting means being operable to slit the web into a plurality of insert ribbons and a package blank ribbon;

means for superimposing the insert ribbons;

said first ribbon cutting means being operable to simultaneously cut the superimposed insert ribbons to form a plurality of stacks of superimposed, discrete, insert sheets;

said first folding means being operable to simultaneously, transversely impress a first fold in each stack of superimposed, discrete, insert sheets;

said transfer means being operable to superimpose the stacks of insert sheets onto the package blank ribbon; and

said third folding means being operable to simultaneously, transversely impress a second fold in each once folded stack of insert sheets while impressing the first fold in the associated package blank.

4. Apparatus according to claim 3, wherein one of said insert blanks is formed with means for adhering one folded section of the blank to another folded section thereof, to form an insert envelope, in response to the folding of the insert.

5. Apparatus according to claim 3, wherein the package blank is formed with means for adhering one folded section of the blank to another folded section thereof, to form a mailing envelope, in response to the impressing of a first fold in the package blank.

6. Apparatus according to claim 5, wherein the package blank is formed with 'means for adhering a folded flap portion thereof to another folded section thereof, in response to the folding of the package blank in said third folding means.

7. In an apparatus for manufacturing stuffed and seal mailing envelopes from a printed web, which has been slit into a plurality of insert ribbons and a mailing envelope ribbon, the combination of:

A. marriage means to marry the insertable ribbons to form superimposed insert ribbons; v

B. first cutter means positioned downstream of the marriage means to transversely cut the superimposed blanks;

C. first fold means associated with the cutter means to simultaneously transversely impress a first fold in the superimposed blanks;

D. transfer means positioned downstream of the first fold means to deposit the first folded blanks upon the mailing envelope ribbon;

E. second cutter means located downstream of the transfer means to cut the-mailing envelope ribbon into mailingenvelope blanks;

F. second fold means associated with the second cutfold in the mailing envelope blank, whereby a completely folded package is produced having the folded, superimposed blanks inside.

8. The invention of claim 7, wherein one of the superimposed insert ribbons is longitudinally folded, the said longitudinally folded ribbon producing a four-page insertable booklet when cut by the cutter means.

9. The invention of claim 7, wherein one of the superimposed insert ribbons is provided with spaced glue strips, said glue stripes adhering to non-glued portions of the ribbon when the ribbon is cut into blanks and folded to thereby form an insert envelope.

10. The invention of claim 9, and moistening roll means interposed between the marriage means and the first cutter means to activate the glue strips prior to the first fold.

11. The invention of claim 7, wherein the mailing envelope ribbon is provided with spaced glue stripes, said glue stripes adhering to non-glued portions of the mailing envelope ribbon when the ribbon is cut into mailing envelope blanks and folded to thereby form a mailing envelope. I

12. The invention of claim 11, and moistening roll means receiving the mailing envelope ribbon with the affixed glue stripes to activate the glue stripes prior to function of the second fold means.

13. The invention of claim 12 and first trimming means to trim the superimposed blanks after they have received the said first fold.

14. The invention of claim 13, and second trimming means to trim themailing envelope blank after it has received its said first fold.

15. The invention of claim 14, wherein the first cutter means and first fold means include a cooperating cutter and tucker cylinder and a jaw and anvil cutter cylinder.

16. The invention of claim 15, wherein the second cutter means and second fold means include a cooperating cutter and tucker cylinder and a jaw and anvil cutter cylinder.

17. A method of manufacturing stuffed and sealed mailing envelopes from a printed, continuous web including the steps of:

A. slitting the web into a plurality of insert ribbons and a mailing envelope ribbon;

B. marrying the insertion ribbons to form superimposed insert ribbons;

C. cutting the superimposed insert ribbons transversely to form superimposed insert blanks; D. folding the insert blanks transversely to form a first fold; 1 E. placing the once folded insert blanks upon the mailing envelope ribbon and cutting the envelope ribbon transversely to fomi envelope blanks; F. folding the insert blanks and envelope blanks simultaneously to form a second fold on the insert blanks and a first fold on the envelope blank; and

G. folding the envelope blank a second time to form of running the mailing envelope ribbon through a pattern gluer to deposit spaced glue stripes thereon prior to folding.

23. The method of claim 22 and the additional step of feeding the mailing envelope ribbon through moisturizers prior to folding, to activate the glue stripes.

24. The method of claim 23 and the additional step of adhering non-glued portions of the mailing envelope ribbon to the glue stripes, to enclose the insert blanks therewithin.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification53/460, 493/220, 493/223, 270/41, 53/206, 270/43
International ClassificationB31B23/00, B65H45/28, B41F13/64, B31B41/00, B31B1/18, B31B39/26
Cooperative ClassificationB31B2221/05, B31B2221/10, B31B41/00, B65H29/51, B41F13/64, B65H45/28
European ClassificationB65H29/51, B31B41/00, B65H45/28, B41F13/64