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Publication numberUS3809076 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 7, 1974
Filing dateJun 16, 1971
Priority dateJun 16, 1971
Publication numberUS 3809076 A, US 3809076A, US-A-3809076, US3809076 A, US3809076A
InventorsChabon I
Original AssigneeChabon I
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Intrauterine contraceptive device
US 3809076 A
Abstract
An intrauterine contraceptive device having a closed perimeter and an interior opening of limited size to prevent catching of a loop of bowel in the event that the device perforates the uterus. The device is of a thin wafer, disc design and is made of silicone rubber elastomer. A steel band may be impressed into the perimeter.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' United States Patent [191 Chabon INTRAUTERINE CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICE [76] Inventor: Irwin Chabon, 500 East 77th St.,

New York, NY. 11209 22 Filed: June 16, 1971 21 App1.No.: 153,754

[52] us, Cl. 128/130.

[51] Int. Cl. A61t 5/46 [58] Field of Search 128/127-131, 128/132 R; 24/90 TA [5 6] 2 References Cited I UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,467,089 9/1969 Hasson 128/130 3,633,574 1/1972 Lerner 128/130 3,527,210 9/1970 Towns 128/130 2,875,755 3/1959 Heuboski et a1 128/127 3,545,439 12/1970 Duncan 128/130 X 539,428 5/1895 Henley & Luken 128/130 3,374,787 3/1968 vl-latke 128/130 [451 May 7, 1974 8/1945 Cohen 24/90 TA OTHER PUBLICATIONS Ishihama, Clinical Studies on Intrauterine Rings, Yokohama Med. 81:11., V0]. 10, No. 2, April 1959, pp. 89404.

Primary Examiner-Richard A. Gaudet Assistant Examiner-G. F. Dunne Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Welder & Gross [57] ABSTRACT (An intrauterine contraceptive device having a closed perimeter and an interior opening of limited size to prevent catching of a loop of bowel in the event that the device perforates the uterus. The device is of a thin wafer, disc design and is made of silicone rubber elastomer. A steel band may be impressed into the perimeter.

9 Claims, 12 Drawing Figures 1 INTRAUTERINE CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICE PRIOR ART Intrauterine contraceptive devices are well known in the art and have taken many different shapes, but the most promising devices have been of a closed perimeter construction, such as disclosed in the Hall U.S. Pat.

No. 3,323,520. This device consists of a helical spring forminga circle with a steel band passing through the interior thereof. However, at least four major disadvantages have been observed with its use.

The spread of the helices predisposes the uterine lining to laceration because of scraping. The thickness of the coils distends the uterine cavity causing cramps. The wide open design results in minimal contact of the surface area as well as retention of a bowel if the lining .is perforated. And since the device is made of stainless ings are designed to be engaged by introducer or extractor tools, which are well known in the art, and may easily engage the openings alongttheir edges.

In order to provide strengthening to the unit, a steel band may be inserted along the perimeter. Instead of the steel bands, silicon rubber rodding may be used.

Additional objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from a consideration of the following detailed description when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

vide a contraceptive device which will be relatively v easy to place within the uterus, adjust its position therein, and remove it.

Yet a further object of the present invention is to provide a contraceptive device having a small cut-out which will not permit any loop of bowel to be caught inside should the 'device enter the abdominal cavity.

Yet a'further object of the present invention is to provide a device of the character described which is fabricated from a material which is easily grasped by the introducer and extractor tools, and yet is tolerated by the body.

Still yet a further object is to provide a device of the character described which may be fabricated from a materialwhich can be sterilized by standard autoclave.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION The present invention contemplates an improved intrauterine contraceptive device which is wafer thin and shaped in the form of a disc, thus presenting a closed perimeter. In cross-section the unit is somewhat elliptical having a greater thickness at the central portion than at the perimeter. Centrally located within the device is a cut-out which may be a dumbbell shape or oppositely disposed cordal sections, resembling a closed maltese cross. The actual openings are small enough so that if the device should pass through the uterus into the abdominal cavity, it would be impossible for a loop of bowel to get caught within the opening. The open- FIG. lis a cross-sectional view of a vagina and uterine cavity with the introducer tool placing an intrauterine contraceptive device embodying the present invention into position within the uterine cavity;

FIG. 2 is a view similar to FIG. 1 with the device moved further along in the uterine cavity;

FIG. 3 is a top plan cross-sectional view of the uterine cavity showing the device in porper position therein;

FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 1, showing the extractor tool engaging the device just prior to its removal from the cavity;

FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 4 with the device being removed from the cavity and passing through the cervix;

FIG. 6 is a plan view of the device engaged by the introducer tool;

FIG. 7 is a view'similar to FIG. 6with the device being engaged by the extractor tool;

FIG. 8 is-a plane view of the device having a steel or silicone rubber rodding band embedded proximate the perimeter;

FIG. 9 is a view similar to FIG. 8 without-the band;

I FIG. 10 is a plane view of the device with a modified cut-out design;

FIG. 11 is a view taken along the lines 1 1--l l of FIG. 8; and

FIG. 12 is a cross-sectional view taken along the lines l2-l2 of FIG. 9.

Referring in detail to the drawings, and in particular.

. to locate the position of the device.

As seen from FIG. 9, this device is circular or disc like in plane view and as seen in FIG. 11in crosssectional configuration it is somewhat elliptical in shape. The device is defined by an .upper surface 12, a

lower surface 14, and a perimeter 1.6. It has been found that the device may have a diameter of 22 mm. and be no more than 2 mm. thick at its midpoint.

Centrallylocated within the device is a cut-out ls in a dumbbell shape defined by parallel side edges 20 and circular end edges 22, 24. This opening is limited in size so that if the device should pass into the abdominal cavity, it would not be possible for any loop of bowel to get caught therein, as has happened with prior art devices.

The device is very flexible and may be folded prior to its introduction into the cervix. In order to provide some additional rigidity to the otherwise resilient mem- 3 her, a stiffening band 26 (FIGS. 8, 11) may be placed within the device proximate the perimeter 16. The band may be 2 mm in width and approximately I/ 10,000 of an inch in thickness, and made of surgical stainless steel.

In order to further minimize the problem of interior body sections becoming entangled within the opening in the device, a different internal opening pattern may be utilized, as such is shown in FIG. 10. In this embodiment a circular opening with perpendicular elements 28 have been designed leaving four oppositely disposed chordal openings 30. These openings leave a much less cross-sectional area than the opening 18, and yet are capable of receiving the operable sections of the tools.

FIG. shows the device with the introducer tool 32 having a lower lip projection 34 and a bulbous end 36. The bulbous end passing through the portion of the opening defined by the edge 22, with the lip 34 catching on the edge as shown. The tool, together with the device, is then placed within the vagina and folded so as to more easily pass through the cervix (FIG. 1). The device is then continually moved inwardly and passes into (FIG. 2) the interior of the uterus until it is placed in position as shown in FIG. 3. In this position there is maximal coverage of the endometrium with minimal distention of the uterus. This is extremely important since one of the major objects of the device is to prevent distention of the uterus.

Periodically, examinations are made to insure that the device remains in proper position within the uterus. If the device must be repositioned, it may be done with the extractor tool 38.

This tool has a slight cavity 40 and an upper lip 42 and an end lip 44. These lips may engage the lower edge 24 of the opening 18 as shown in FIG. 5. Utilizing the lips 42, 44 or the lip 34, the device may be properly repositioned within the uterine cavity (FIG. 3). In addition, the device may be removed by engaging the lip 44 on the edge 24 and withdrawing the device from the uterine'cavity, allowing it to pass through the cervix (FIG. 4).

In a like manner, the embodiment shown in FIG. can be easily engaged by the lips 34, 42, 44 and positioned within the uterus and removed as previously shown.

The terms and expressions which have been employed here are used as terms of description and not of limitation, and there is no intention in the use of such terms and expressions, of excluding equivalents of the features shown and described, or portions thereof, it being recognized that various modifications are possible within the scope of the invention claimed.

What is claimed is:

1. An intrauterine contraceptive device comprising:

a. a wafer, disc shaped body, fonned of an elastomeric material compatible with retention in the uterus said body having a substantially symmetrically taped cross-section such that a relatively thick central portion gradually tapers to a thin perimeter portion, the-body being flexible in any orientation, sufficient to allow passage from the vagina into the uterus; and

b. an interior opening defined in the face of the body and passing therethrough, said body containing a small cut out portion facilitating engagement of introducer-extractor devices, the size of the opening being restricted to prevent passage of a loop of bowel from passing therethrough in the event of uterine perforation.

2. The invention according to claim 1, the body being circular in plane view and somewhat elliptical in side elevational view.

3. The invention according to claim 2, the body having a diameter of 22 mm. and a thickness of no more than approximately 2 mm. at its midpoint.

4. The invention according to claim 1, a stiffening band located within the body and proximate the perimeter.

5. The invention according to claim 4, the band being made of surgical stainless steel.

6. The invention according to claim 4, the band being 2 mm. in width and approximately l/ 10,000 of an inch in thickness.

7. The invention according to claim 1, the body being made of silicone rubber.

8. The invention according to claim 1, the cut out portion defined by parallel central edges and circular end edges, resembling a dumbbell shape.

9. The invention according to claim 1, the cut out portion having a circular outer edge with intersecting elements therein defining opposingly disposed chordal openings.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US539428 *Dec 28, 1894May 21, 1895 Veterinary device
US2383238 *Jul 23, 1943Aug 21, 1945Magnus CohenButton
US2875755 *Jun 21, 1954Mar 3, 1959Walter J HeuboskiPessary
US3374787 *Nov 18, 1965Mar 26, 1968Rca CorpIntra-uterine contraceptive device
US3467089 *Feb 14, 1967Sep 16, 1969Hollister IncIntrauterine contraceptive device (iud)
US3527210 *Apr 30, 1965Sep 8, 1970Ortho Pharma CorpMolded spring return means for plastic articles
US3545439 *Jan 4, 1968Dec 8, 1970Upjohn CoMedicated devices and methods
US3633574 *Nov 14, 1968Jan 11, 1972Robins Co Inc A HIntrauterine contraceptive device
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *Ishihama, Clinical Studies on Intrauterine Rings, Yokohama Med. Bull., Vol. 10, No. 2, April 1959, pp. 89 104.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3908646 *Mar 27, 1974Sep 30, 1975Ansari Amir HConcentric loop intrauterine device
US3954103 *Dec 9, 1974May 4, 1976Garcia Roel RicardoApparatus and intrauterine device for the immediate puerperium for the control of human fertility
Classifications
U.S. Classification128/839
International ClassificationA61F6/00, A61F6/14
Cooperative ClassificationA61F6/148
European ClassificationA61F6/14E