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Publication numberUS3809089 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 7, 1974
Filing dateMay 8, 1973
Priority dateMay 26, 1971
Publication numberUS 3809089 A, US 3809089A, US-A-3809089, US3809089 A, US3809089A
InventorsB Hedstrom, E Hoden
Original AssigneeB Hedstrom, E Hoden
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Diaper
US 3809089 A
Abstract
A diaper including a thin and flexible plastic back sheet or swaddle contoured and dimensioned to enable a person handling an infant to adjust it without requiring a separate fastening means. The back sheet is provided with a lining of liquid penetratable nature, the lining preferably extending over and covering the entire inner fact of the back sheet. An absorbent wadding or pad is interposed between the lining and the back sheet.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Hedstrom et a1.

DIAPER Inventors: Bengt Hedstrom, lnspectorsbacken 59; Ebbe Hoden, St. Eriksgatan 67, both of Stockholm, Sweden Filed: May 8, 1973 Appl. No.: 358,380

Related US. Application Data Continuation -of Ser. No. 146,796, May 26, 1971,

No. 783,612, Dec. 13, 1968, abandoned.

111:; ..A41b13/02 Field of smell 128/284, 286,287, 290,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1/1906 Green [28/296 4/1960 Dexter..... 128/284 3/1961 Dudley 123/287 [451 May 7, 197.4

3,036,573 5/1962 'Voigtman et a1. 128/287 3,180,335 4/1965 Duncan et al. 128/287 3,386,442 6/1968 Sabee 128/287 3,395,708 8/1968 Hervey et a1. 128/284 3,563,242 2/1971 Hedstrom et a1. 128/287 3,604,422 9/1971 Sabee 128/287 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS Switzerland 128/284 Primary Examiner-Charles F. Rosenbaum abandoned, which is a continuation-in part of Ser. 1

s71 ABSTRACT A diaper including a thin and flexible plastic back sheet or Swaddle contoured and dimensioned to enable a person handling an infant to adjust it without requiring a separate fastening means. The back sheet is provided with a lining of liquid penetratable nature, the lining preferably extending over and covering the entire inner fact of the back sheet. An absorbent wadding or pad is interposed between the lining and the back sheet.

, 3 Claims, 10 Drawing Figures mummy 11m slaosioes sum 1 or 2 Hllll HIHHIHIIHHHUH 15 74 1 V Attorney A 1 DIAPER This application is a continuation of application Ser. No. 146,796 filed May 26, 1971 which in turn was a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 783,612 filed Dec. 13, 1968 both now abandoned.

This invention relates to diapers and more particularly to a type which has its parts or elements composed of such materials that the diaper can be disposed of after soiling.

Many disposable diapers, as previously known, have been relatively expensive because of the materials used in them; because of manufacturing difficulties; and moreover were often so constructed that the full protection required was not always obtained. In addition, some of the materials used, and particularly for the outer covering or back sheet, such as a coated, moistore-resistant paper, were stiff and often relatively heavy and sometimes presented edges or parts which,

when unprotected, were likely to cause irritation and injury to the-tender skin of the infant.

The absorbent padding used in some prior types often shifted in the outer covering and failed to then properly coverthe area required for protection, resulting in the spreading of the body fluids so that leakage occurred and as a result, protective means additional to the diaper were often required and were found uncomfortable, particularly in warm weather.

It is an object of the invention to provide a diaper which can be disposed of as a whole when soiled, since the materials of which it is composed are relatively inexpensive and which. materials will not cause irritation or chaffing of the skin of the infant, andwhich diaper requires no separate fastening devices such as pins or tapes which sometimes cause irritation and injury to the child.

. Another object of the invention is to provide a padretaining arrangement or pocket for the absorbent pad or wadding employed in the diaper, which pocket is formed by cooperation between an inner lining and the outer sheet or body of the diaper, and without adding bulk to the diaper. The pocket so disposed is effective to definitely retain the pad in one specific protective position and therefore acts to prevent shifting of the pad.

It is still another object of the invention to provide a I protective diaper pad which is more liquid absorbent in the central portion thereof where the greatest absorbency is required than along the edges thereof.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a protective diaper pad that includes a liquid-absorbent wadding or 'flufi and a barrier means interposed between layers of the wadding which is effective to insure relatively uniform liquid distribution throughout the pad.

With these and other objects to be hereinafter set forth, we have devised the arrangements of parts and materials to be described and more particularly pointed out in the claims appended hereto.

In the accompanying drawings, wherein an illustrative embodiment of the inventionis illustrated,

FIG. I is a face view, looking at the inner face of a diaper, while the same is in a flattened position; a pad being shown in full rather than in section and with a portion of the inner lining broken away to expose a part of the outer covering or body;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view, taken substantially on the line 2-2 of FIG. 1, looking in the; direction of the arrows;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view, taken substantially on the line 3-3 of FIG. 1, looking in the direction of the arrows; v

FIG. 4 is a face view of the pad, with portions thereof fragmentarily shown;

. FIG. 5 is a sectional view, taken substantially onthe line 55 of FIG. 1, looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 6 is a face view of a further embodiment of the invention, looking at the inner face of the diaper while the same is in flattened position; the pad being shown in full rather than in section and with a portion of the inner lining and the binding tape broken away to expose the pad; 1

FIG. 7 is a sectional view, taken substantially on the line 7-7 of FIG. 6, looking in the direction of the arrows; t

FIG. 8 is a sectional view, taken substantially on the line 8-8 of FIG. 6, looking inthe direction of the arrows;

FIG. .9 is a perspective view partly insection of a modification of the pad shown in FIG. 4; and

FIG. 10 is a sectional view, taken substantially on the line 10-10 of FIG. 9, looking in. the direction of the arrows.

Referring to the drawing, the diaper therein shown includes a very thin and flexible back sheet or swaddle indicated at l. The back sheet or swaddle has what might be termed an hour glass contour.

Theinner fact of the sheet I is covered,.either partly or wholly for its entire area, by a linin'g sheet 2 corresponding in shape and size to the back sheet or covering 1. A pad is shown at 3 and the same is disposed transversely of the lined sheets 1, 2 and is confined between theliningsheetZ andthe backsheet lin a pocket 4.] The lining sheet 2, which contacts with the body of the child, is preferably composed of a thin, soft and flexible as well as a liquid-absorbent material such as paper or other suitable material. The pocket 4 is formed between the lining and the back sheet 1 by leaving the central area 20 of the lining free of its attachment to the inside face of the back sheet 1, which area .is of a shape to conform to the pad and is sufficiently large to result in a pocket to snuggly receive and enclose the pad 3. The remainder of the lining in areas shown at 5, 6, 7.and 8 around the four sides of the pad may be adherently attached to the inner face of the back sheet or covering 1. Thus, the pad 3 will be confined in the pocket 4 and cannot shift and will thus be constantly maintained in the required protective position.

In applying the diaper, constructed as above described, the portions shown at 9 and 10 and at 7a and 8a are tied together about the waist of the child, the flexible nature of the back sheet and its lining readily permitting the adjustment and tieing together of the mensioned as disclosed, which makes it applicable to infants of different stages of development and size.

The pad 3 may be suitably made of any soft and absorbent material and may be in the form of an elongated flattened roll or tube, closed at its opposite ends by being crimped and/or heat-sealed as shown at 12 and 13.

The pad 3 is located in the central part of the back sheet 1 and covers the portion of the infants anatomy from which the emanation of fluid occurs and is captured by the pad. The pad includes a top sheet or envelope which may consist of compliant, soft-feeling, porous, hydrophoric paper or any other non-woven fabric web. An example of a non-woven fabric sheet that is particularly suitable is a rayon fabric of about 1.5 to 3 deniers impregnated with a thermoplastic binder, such as for example, co-polymers of an ester of acrylic acid. For best results, surfactants should be minimal in the binder emulsion and avoided in the final bath. The covering 15 of the pad is liquid permeable and serves to disperse the liquid throughout the pad, thus avoiding the undue collection or pooling of the body fluid in certain parts of the pad, but rather assuring itsuniform spread or dispersion through the pad.

Contained within the pad is a wadding or filling 14 which fills the interior of the pad but not to an extent to deform the pad from its desired normally relatively flat condition. The wadding or filling 14 comprises layers confined within the covering 15. Interposedbetween the layers of the filling is a barrier sheet 16. This barrier sheet may consist of a polyvinyl chloride sheet; it may also be a sheet of cellulosic material similar to that of the covering 15. In the latter case, it should also be impregnated with a plastic or resinous material, such as polyvinyl chloride or melamine, carbamide, or phenyolformaldehyde resins, in a proportion to increase its wet strength without affecting its moisture absorbent characteristics.

The barrier sheet 16, in addition to serving the purpose of diffusing the liquid throughout the wadding or fluff, also serves the purpose of reinforcing the wadding or fluff. The wadding or fluff'consists of one or more layers, two being shown, of bleached, drydrained pulp, preferably bleached sulfite pulp. The approximate amount of the fluff in each pad may be about 32 to 33 grams. The layers of the filling may be adhesively or otherwise adherently joined to the barrier sheet or the same remain loose between such layers.

In addition to aiding in the spread of liquid throughout the wadding or fluff, the moisture-resistant barrier sheet 16 also serves to reinforce the wadding to prevent bunching, etc. The crimped ends of the pad may be sealed by compressing the several layers under heat and pressure. 1

FIGS. 9 and 10 show another form of pad which may be substituted for the pad 3. The parts of the pad shown in FIGS. 9 and 10 having the same numerical designations as the pad shown in FIG. 5 are identical in the two embodiments and have already been described. The outer tubular covering 21 is a porous, liquidpermeable, non-woven, cellulosic sheet material treated with a hydrophobic substance to increase its wet strength while maintaining its liquid-permeable characteristics. Interposed between the wadding 14 and the outer tubular covering 21 is at least one ply of a moisture-absorbent sheet material. The opposite ends of the pad are crimped and/or heat-sealed as shown at 23. The pad shown in FIGS. 9 and 10 offers the advantage in that the wadding or filling 14 is surrounded with a moisture-absorbent sheet material to aid in liquid absorbency and then a layer'of a hydrophobic substance having a high wet strength but at the same time being liquid-permeable.

A modification of the diaper construction shown in FIGS. 1 3 is shown in FIGS. 6 8. This modified diaper comprises a backing sheet 25 similar to the backing sheet 1 of the diaper shown in FIG. 1. The inner fact of the back sheet 25 is covered almost entirely by a lining sheet 26, and a pad 27 is confined between the lining sheet 26 and the back sheet 25. The lining sheet conforms in shape and size substantially to that of the back sheet 25 with the opposite sides passing around the sides of the pad 27 and secured by adhesive at the opposite sides to the back sheet 25. The lining sheet 26, which contacts with the body of the child, is preferably composed of a material similar to that of the lining sheet 2 of FIG. 1.

The pad 27 consists of a wadding or filling which is cut in a rectangular shape. The central portion of the filling is crushed to reduce its width to conform with the shape of the back sheet 25, and it is retained in this position by the lining sheet 26 when secured at the opposite sides to the back sheet 25. The opposite ends 30 and 31 of the filling remain extended to substantially the full width of the filling. The fluid absorbency of the pad is greatest in the central narrow portion where the filling is crushed. The filling overlaps itself to obtain the greater absorbency as shown in cross-section in FIG. 7. At the same time the opposite ends 30 and 31 of the pad remain substantially flat permitting proper fit on the infant.

Wide overlapping tapes 32 and 33 serve a dual function in that they bind the opposite ends 30 and 31 of the diaper and also serve as ties for securing the diaper about the waist of the infant. One side of each elongated tape is secured by adhesive or is heat-sealed to the edge of the back sheet 25 while the opposite edge of each tape is wrapped around the end of the diaper and secured adhesively to the end of the lining sheet 26. The pad 27 is thus completely enclosed between the back sheet 25 and the lining sheet 26. The free ends of the tapes 32 and 33 are folded double and bonded to form the ties. Extensions 34 are included in the back sheet 25 to reinforce the diaper at the point wherethe tapes 32 and 33 extend beyond the back sheet 25. These extensions secured between parts of the folded sections of each tape serve to reinforce the diaper and prevent tearing while the diaper is being worn by the infant.

Optionally, a pair of tapes similar to tapes 32 and 33 may be used with-the diaper construction shown in FIG. 1, the tapes being folded over the opposite ends of the diaper similarly to the arrangement shown in FIG. 6 and the free ends extending beyond the portions 7a, 8a, 9 and 10.

The diaper pad, constructed as above-described, is soft and compliant; the materials employed are relatively inexpensive so that the entire diaper can be discarded when soiled. The material of which the pad is made also disintegrates fairly rapidly when submerged in liquid expediting the disposal process. The maintenance of the pad in position between the outer sheet and lining assures the retention of the pad in the proper location affording full protection.

What we claim is:

1. A diaper comprising:

a, a flat outer sheet of liquid-impervious nature having an hour-glass configuration with the opposite ends thereof being generally straight and the opposite edges extending between said ends being notched to conform about the legs of an infant;

b. an absorbent pad web conforming in shape to and being substantially coextensive with said outer sheet and contiguous to one surface thereof, the opposite edges of said pad web, which has a generally rectangular shape when flattened, being compressed towards each other to conformto the configuration of the notched edges of said outer flat sheet such that the portion of said pad web between said notched edges is crushed and overlaps itself to provide greater bulk and liquid absorbency while the opposite ends thereof are flat, have less bulk, and are coextensive with the ends of said outer sheet, and

c. a flat inner lining web conforming substantially in shape to said pad web and said outer flat sheet, one

surface of said lining web being contiguous with the side of said pad web opposite said outer flat sheet, said lining web extending about said opposite edges of said pad web with the surface of said lining web opposite said one surface being bonded to said one surface of said outer sheet to secure and maintain- 3. A diaper according to claim 2 wherein portions of said outer sheet adjacent the ends thereof extend beyond said inner lining, the interior surfaces of said U- shaped tapes being bonded to said extended portions to reinforce said diaper. a: =0:

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US810133 *Jun 13, 1904Jan 16, 1906American Absorbent Fiber CompanyAbsorbent bandage.
US2931360 *Sep 16, 1957Apr 5, 1960Fred F DexterDiaper
US2973760 *Jun 30, 1958Mar 7, 1961Scott Paper CoSanitary napkin
US3036573 *Apr 10, 1957May 29, 1962Kimberly Clark CoCellulosic product
US3180335 *Jul 17, 1961Apr 27, 1965Procter & GambleDisposable diaper
US3386442 *Mar 29, 1965Jun 4, 1968Sabee ReinhardtDisposable diaper
US3395708 *Nov 9, 1966Aug 6, 1968Riegel Textile CorpMethod for improving a fluffed fibrous wood pulp batt for use in sanitary products and the products thereof
US3563242 *Jan 25, 1968Feb 16, 1971Bengt HedstromDiaper
US3604422 *Oct 16, 1968Sep 14, 1971Reinhardt N SabeeDiaper with soft edges and nonleaking side seal
CH248461A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4327729 *Jun 27, 1977May 4, 1982The Procter & Gamble CompanyLow-density disposable absorbent bandage having low stretch, wet strength center ply to provide improved pad integrity in use
US4568341 *Mar 10, 1983Feb 4, 1986James G. MitchellAbsorbent pads, incontinence care products and methods of production
US5990377 *Dec 23, 1997Nov 23, 1999Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Dual-zoned absorbent webs
US6395957Jul 14, 1999May 28, 2002Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Dual-zoned absorbent webs
US6911573Jan 8, 2002Jun 28, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Dual-zoned absorbent webs
EP0000593A1 *Jun 15, 1978Feb 7, 1979THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANYLow-density disposable absorbent bandage
EP0231974A1 *Jan 29, 1987Aug 12, 1987Ancilla B.V.Disposable napkin
WO1998042289A1Mar 13, 1998Oct 1, 1998Kimberly Clark CoDual-zoned absorbent webs
WO1998042290A1Mar 20, 1998Oct 1, 1998Kimberly Clark CoDual-zoned absorbent webs
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/366, 604/373, 604/370
International ClassificationA61F13/15
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/53704, A61F13/53436
European ClassificationA61F13/534B6, A61F13/537A