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Publication numberUS3809318 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 7, 1974
Filing dateOct 31, 1972
Priority dateNov 12, 1971
Also published asCA958724A1
Publication numberUS 3809318 A, US 3809318A, US-A-3809318, US3809318 A, US3809318A
InventorsYamamoto M
Original AssigneeMitsui Mining Co Ltd, Nihom Kikai Kogiyo Co Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Monitor for digging coal
US 3809318 A
Abstract
The present invention relates to a monitor used in coal mines for digging coal. The impact of pressured water against a coal face through the nozzle of the monitor effects the coal digging operation. In working the coal face, coal thrown out from the coal face will clash against the monitor, and falling coal lumps will bury the monitor thus decreasing the efficiency of coal digging operation, and the known type of monitor has suffered damage from such severe conditions. According to the present invention, the above impediment has been for the most part eliminated by virtue of the novel constructions wherein the cylinder for raising and lowering the nozzle of the monitor is mounted just behind the monitor while the unit for turning the nozzle of the monitor is disposed under main water supply pipe and is received and closed in a housing. This construction has further advantages in that the full height of the monitor is markedly decreased and in that the stability thereof is greatly increased.
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United States Patent [191 Yamamoto [11] 3,809,318 May 7,1974

[ MONITOR FOR DIGGING COAL [75] Inventor: Masami Yamamoto, Tokyo, Japan [73] Assignees: Mitsui Mining Company, Limited;

Nihom Kikai Kogiyo Co., Ltd., both of Tokyo, Japan [22 Filed: Oct. 31, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 302,503

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Nov. 12, 1971 Japan 46-90435 [51] Int. Cl. E210 45/00 [58] Field of Search 239/587, 273, 288; 169/25; 299/16, 17; 175/422 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 803,587 11/1905 Hanford 299/17 2,698,664 l/1955 Freeman 239/587 X 965,709 7/1910 Hart 4. 239/587 X 2,111,553 3/1938 Chew 239/587 X FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATlONS 176,543 11/1965 U.S.S.R 299/17 14 egg! 4 Primary ExaminerM. Henson Wood, Jr. Assistant Examiner-Andres Kashnikow Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Wenderoth, Lind & Ponack 57] ABSTRACT The present invention relates to a monitor used in coal mines for digging coal. The impact of pressured water against a coal face through the nozzle of the monitor effects the coal digging operationQln working the coal face, coal thrown out from the coal face will clash against the monitor, and falling coal lumps will bury the monitor thus decreasing the efficiency of coal digging operation, and the known type of monitor has suffered damage from such severe conditions. According to the present invention, the above impediment has been for the most part eliminated by virtue of the novel constructions wherein the cylinder for raising and lowering the nozzle of the monitor is mounted just behind the monitor while the unit for turning the nozzle of the monitor is disposed under main water supply pipe and is received and closed in a housing. This construction has further advantages in that the full height of the monitor is markedly decreased and in that the stability thereof is greatly increased.

4 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures PAIENIEUIAY 1 1914 3,809,318

SHEET 1 OF 2 MONITOR FOR DIGGING COAL of which are free from the impediments likely to arise under the severe conditions met in working a coal face such as impact of thrown coal and being buried under coal lumps.

A monitor used in a coal mine for digging coal should be constructed as strongly as possible so as to hold up under bad conditions encountered in carrying out coal digging operations. For example, the impact given to the monitor by coal thrown from the coal face will cause damage to the monitor and the falling coal lumps will bury the lower half of the monitor thus hindering prearranged coal digging performance.

Since the conditions for digging coal are as above, it is desirable to dispose the members for effecting handling of the monitor in a position protected from the impact of coal, and it is also desirable to minimize the exposure of movable members in the monitor to prevent hindrance or stoppage of work due to the falling coal lumps. Nevertheless, the construction of known monitors for digging coal was such that the water pressure cylinder for raising and lowering the nozzle was disposed in front of the monitor and the top of the piston-rod of the water pressure cylinder for turning the monitor was connected to the arm projecting from the outer surface of the lower portion of the monitor. As an inevitable consequence, the movable members for handling the monitor were apt to suffer damage from theimpact of scattered coal and from the mass of falling coal lumps, and this has decreased the efficiency of the coal mining operation.

According to the present invention the above said defects of the conventional monitor are for the most part eliminated by virtue of the characteristic feature thereof wherein the cylinder for raising and lowering the nozzle is provided behind the monitor body while the turning device of the monitor is composed of an assembled rack and pinion, said rack being connected to a piston-rod movable in the cylinder for turning the monitor, said cylinder for turning the monitor being disposed under a main water supply pipe, and said movable members being received and closed in a housing.

The characteristic aspects of the present invention will be explained hereinbelow in detail with reference to the attached drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a side plan view showing the example of the monitor for digging coal according to the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the monitor of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged elevational view taken on line III-III OF FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken on line IV-IV of FIG. 3.

The monitor according to the present invention comprises a barge-like base plate 1, base frames 2 received in and fixed to said plate 1, a main water-supply pipe having a swivel means therein, a holding means or gripping means 4 which constitutes the joint of said water supply pipe 3, the lower end of the holding means being firmly secured to the base frames 2. The monitor according to the present invention further comprises a tubular member 5 closed at the bottom thereof and rotatably inserted into the holding means 4, a circular water passage 6 formed between the holding means 4 and the tubular member 5, openings 7 bored in the wall of the tubular member 5 for passing water therethrough, a two-way water supply pipe 8 having swivel means which are mounted on the upper end of the tubular -member 5, holding means 9, 9 which serve as joint means, a base tube 10 for mounting a projected delivery pipe thereon, both of the end portions of the base tube 10 being rotatably inserted in the holding means 9, 9, annular water passages 11, openings 12 for passing water therethrough and a nozzle 14.

Water under pressure supplied to the main water supply pipe 3 runs into the tubular member 5 through the circular water passage 6 and the openings 7, is split in the two-way pipe 8, after which the water streams meet again at the exit of the base tube 10 through the openings l2 and finally spurt out from the nozzle 14 via the projected delivery pipe 13, thus making it possible to dig coal from a coal face by means of the impact given by the pressured water.

As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the monitor according to the present invention has an arm 15 protruding rearwardly from the center of the base tube 10 and support arm 16, 16 correspondingly protruding from the lower part of the two-way water supply pipe 8. A cylinder 17 for raising and lowering the nozzle 14 is pivotally engaged with the support arms l6, 16 by means of two shafts 18, 18 oppositely fitted to the lower part thereof, and the top of the piston rod 19 is pivotally connected to the arm 15 by means of a pin 20. By virtue of the above mentioned construction, the cylinder 17 for raising and lowering the nozzle can be disposed behind the body of the monitor.

In FIGS. 3 and 4, the device for turning the nozzle of the monitor is illustrated. Numeral 21 indicates a fixed shaft located at the center of the bottom of the tubular member 5. A pinion 22 is mounted on the shaft 21. A rack 23 engages with the pinion 22 and one of the end portions of the rack 23 is connected by means of a pin 26 to the top of a piston rod received in a cylinder 29. The cylinder 29 is secured to the base frame 2 and serves to turn the nozzle through the movement of the piston rod 25.

As seen in FIG. 4, the movable members for turning the nozzle are received in and covered by housing members 27, 28 both of which are secured to the bottom of the holding member 4. Numerals 30, 30 indicate packing means.

As is explained above, the cylinder for raising and lowering the nozzle of the monitor with the movable members having relation to the cylinder 17 are hidden behind the body of the monitor, and this brings about an important advantage in that the cylinder for raising and lowering the nozzle and the movable members related thereto are protected from the impact of coal lumps thrown out during coal digging operation. Further, since the members movable relative to the cylinder for turning the nozzle are received in and surrounded by the housing member disposed at the lower part of the monitor body, the possibility of falling coal lumps impeding operation is completely eliminated.

The main water supply pipe according to the present invention is of the swivel type, and the members for regulating the turning motion of the nozzle, that is, the assembly of pinion, rack, piston rod and cylinder, are

3 disposed under the swivel. So, the full height of the monitor is markedly less, than that of prior art devices and the stability thereof is greatly improved. These further advantages obtained by the present invention also increase the efficiency in coal digging operation.

While there has been described what is at present considered to be the preferred embodiment of the invention, it will be understood that various modifications may be made therein and it is intended that the claims include all such modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention.

What we claim is: g

l. A monitor fordigging coal comprising a barge-like base plate, a main water supply pipe secured to said base plate, a tubular member rotatably held by said main water supply pipe, a two-way pipe having two tops and one bottom mounted on said tubular member, a pivotal nozzle member operably connected to said two way pipe and including a nozzle, a first water pressure cylinder for raising and lowering the nozzle of the monitor, said first cylinder being mounted behind said twoway pipe, a shaft projecting downwardly from the bottom of said tubular member, a pinion mounted on said shaft, a rack which engages with. said pinion, a second cylinder having a piston-rod received therein said rack being connected to said piston-rod for turning the nozzle of the monitor in a horizontal plane, said shaft and rack and the second cylinder being received in and tightly surrounded by a housing member secured to the bottom of a holding member which grasps said tubular member held by said water supply pipe.

2. A monitor for digging coal as set forth in claim 1 wherein the nozzle of the monitors is connected to said two-way pipe be means ofa base tube which has an exit at the center of the length thereof and holding means connected to each of the tops of said two-way pipes and I said base tube for rotatably supporting said base tube,

said exit communicating with the nozzle of the monitor.

3. A monitor for digging coal as set forth in claim 1 wherein the first cylinder for raising and lowering the nozzle of the monitor is supported by two arms which using swivels in each of the holding means.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US803587 *Jan 19, 1904Nov 7, 1905Robert G HanfordDredging apparatus.
US965709 *Mar 9, 1909Jul 26, 1910Milton H HartNozzle for fire-fighting apparatus.
US2111553 *Oct 15, 1936Mar 22, 1938Lain Chew YeeMining monitor or nozzle
US2698664 *Dec 1, 1951Jan 4, 1955Rockwood Sprinkler CoFire-fighting turret
SU176543A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3995908 *Dec 8, 1975Dec 7, 1976Razgildeev Gennady InnokentievHydraulic-mechanical coal mining combine
US4708395 *Aug 8, 1986Nov 24, 1987Conoco Inc.Remotely sensing of excavation cavity during mining
US4732106 *Jul 22, 1986Mar 22, 1988Milad Anis ISteering control for submarines and the like
US6832734Sep 24, 2001Dec 21, 2004Southwest Research InstituteMedia discharge device
US7967390May 25, 2007Jun 28, 2011Mac & Mac Hydrodemolition Inc.Machine and method for deconstructing a vertical wall
US8191972 *Oct 27, 2004Jun 5, 2012Mac & Mac Hydrodemolition Inc.Hydrodemolition machine for inclined surfaces
US8814274Feb 12, 2010Aug 26, 2014Gerard J. MacNeilMachine and method for deconstructing a vertical wall
US8827373Feb 2, 2011Sep 9, 2014Mac & Mac Hydrodemolition Inc.Top-down hydro-demolition system with rigid support frame
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/273, 299/17, 239/587.2, 239/288
International ClassificationE21C25/60, B05B3/14
Cooperative ClassificationE21C25/60, B05B3/14
European ClassificationB05B3/14, E21C25/60