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Publication numberUS3810411 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 14, 1974
Filing dateJun 3, 1971
Priority dateMay 12, 1967
Publication numberUS 3810411 A, US 3810411A, US-A-3810411, US3810411 A, US3810411A
InventorsSchambacher E
Original AssigneeSchambacher E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Baton
US 3810411 A
Abstract
A baton shaft is constructed from aluminum tubing which is anodized and dyed a desired color. Portions of the dyed surface are then removed to expose the aluminum which contrasts with the dyed surface portion and forms a design. A steel member is inserted inside the aluminum tube to provide for additional strength of the baton shaft. Balancing weights are secured to each end of the baton shaft. A ball is then positioned on one end of the baton shaft and a tip is positioned on the other. The ball and tip have a number of lobes thereon to reduce rolling of the baton on a surface.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191,

, Schambacher [111 3,810,411 [451 May 14, 1974 1 BATON [76] Inventor: Eugene E. Schambacher, 12700 Eastwood B1vd., Garfield Heights, .Ohio 44125 [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 638,032, May 12.

I967, abandoned.

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 642,138 8/1950 Great Britain 84/477 B OTHER PUBLICATIONS Leedy Catalog No. 58, Leedy Drum and Tympani, Chicago, 111., 1958, p. 31.

Primary Examiner-Richard B. Wilkinson- Assistant Exqminer.lohn F. Gonzales 57 ABSTRACT A baton shaft is constructed from aluminum tubing which is anodized and dyed a desired color. Portions of the dyed surface are then removed to expose the aluminum which contrasts with the dyed surface portion and forms a design. A steel member is inserted inside the aluminum tube to provide for additional strength of the baton shaft. Balancing weights are secured to each end of the baton shaft. A ball is then positioned on one end of the baton shaft and a tip is positioned on the other. The ball and tip have a number of lobes thereon to reduce rolling of the baton on a surface.

7 Claims,'6 Drawing Figures PATENTEDM'AY 14 m4 SHEEI 1 BF 2 4 ALUMINUM STOCK CUTTo '27 i TUBE STOCK DESIRED LENGTH OFSHAFI m amen-n H o R'NSE m DIP o 0mm; I 2

ANODIZED wn'n H o muse SULPHURICACID a RINSE H O RINSE. 1 315253 H 0 RINSE NICKELACETATE H o RINSE DYED SURFACE CUT AWAY a SEALER TO EXPOSE ALUMINUM AND FORM DESIRED DESIGN RlVETS ADDED TO ENDS OF SHAFT FOR BALANCE RUBBER BALL AND TIP AQSEMBLED ON THE ENDS OF SHAFT ATTORN'YS' BATON The present application is a continuation-in-part of less force to move it through the fingers, but yet has sufficient strength to resist permanent deformation when subjected to the forces encountered during normal use, and is highly resistant to corrosion, easily cleaned, and is extremely decorative. I

Another object of the present invention is to provide anew and improved baton having a tubular anodized aluminum shaft with the anodized surface thereof dyed a particular color and portions of the dyed surface removed to expose the aluminum which contrasts with the colored surface portions and forms a design thereon.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved baton having a tubular anodized aluminum shaft with theanodized surface dyed a particular color and portions thereof removed to expose the aluminum whichcontrasts with the colored surface and having a steel member which engages the inside of the tubular aluminum shaft to thereby provide additional strength. 7

A still further object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved baton having a tubular anodized aluminum 'shaft' with the anodized surface thereof dyed a particular color and portions of the dyed surface removed to expose the aluminum which contrasts with the colored surface portions and a ball positioned on one end of the shaft and a tip positioned on the other end of the shaft, which ball and tip have lobes thereon to reduce rolling of the baton when supported by a surface. i i

Yet a further object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved baton having a tubular anodized aluminum shaft with anodized. surface thereof dyed a particular colorand portions of the dyed surface removed to expose the aluminum which contrasts with the colored portions and which baton includes weights on each of the ends of the shaft to balance the baton when it is twirled.

A still further object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved baton having a tubular anodized aluminum shaft with the anodized surface thereof dyed a particular color and portions of the dyed surface removed to expose the aluminum which contrasts with the colored surface portion and forms a design thereon so that a reminder grip is provided by the circles of light created by the exposed aluminum portions which contrast with the colored circles created by the colored surface when the-baton is twirled.

These and otherobjects will become apparent from the following description ofa preferred embodiment of the present invention made in conjunction with the attached drawings forming a part thereof and in which:

FIG. 1 is a schematic representation of the method of making a baton according to thepresent invention;

FIG. 2 is an elevational-view of a baton shaft with portions shown in section and embodying the present invention;

FIG. 3 is an elevational view of a second embodiment of a baton. shaft of the present invention with portions thereof shown in section and a weighted member on each end of the shaft;" v

FIG. 4 is a sectional view of one weighted member shown in FIG. 3; a

FIG. 5 is an end view of the baton shown in FIG. 3 taken along lines 55 thereof; and

FIG. 6 is an end view of the baton shown in FIG. 3 and taken along lines 66 thereof.

The present invention provides a novel baton shaft of the type which is adapted to be twirled and a novel method of making the baton shaft. The baton shaft is constructed from aluminum tubing which, it has been discovered, possesses many favorable attributes for use as the shaft of a baton. One of the important attributes of aluminum is that it is comparatively light in weight and when used as a baton shaft it has been found that it can be readily and economically balanced to provide good twirling characteristics. Furthermore, aluminum possesses the requisite flexibility and strength making it capable of withstanding permanent deformation when subjected to the usual bending and other types of stresses to which a baton is subjected in the course of normal use. It has also been discovered that additional forces and stresses on the baton shaft may be withstood by providing a steel-member which engages the inside of the aluminum tube. Another advantage found in the use of aluminum as a baton shaft is that it can be anodized to make the shaft-highly resistant to corrosion and -tain areas along the shaft to a depth to expose the aluminum color of the tubing. The color contrast between the exposed aluminum portions and the dyedportions of the shaft can be so arranged to present a number of different designs along the shaft. Moreover, the anodizinginsula'tes the aluminum surface against the passage of electricity.

When the baton is twirled a series of concentric circles alternating between the colors of the exposed aluminum portions and the dyed portions of the shaft. These circles are not provided in the central portion of the shaft to provide theperson twirling the baton with a visible reminder grip. This reminder grip shows the person where to catch the baton after throwing it with an upward twirling motion. The alternate concentric circles of bright exposed aluminum and colored dyed portion of the shaftalso give the viewer the illusion of a twirling speed greater than the actual speed of the baton.

Weights are also provided at both ends of the shaft to provide for better balance of the baton as it is twirled. Each of the ends also has a ball or a tip thereon having lobes about the periphery thereof to minimize rolling of the baton on a surface.

Referring to the drawings, FIG. l discloses schematically the preferred operations employed in making the baton and FIG. 2 discloses a baton made in accordance with the method illustrated in FIG. 1.

To make the baton shaft, aluminum stock of the proper gauge and diameter is cut to the desired length at an initial station indicated generally as in FIG. 1. Tubular aluminum stock is available in various gauges and diameters and the appropriate stock is selected according to the type of baton desired. Any suitable cutting mechanism such as a saw or the like may be employed to cut the tubular stock into the desired length. The shafts are then cleaned, and burrs and nicks removed therefrom.

The baton shafts are prepared for anodizing by first immersing them into a bright dip solution at station 12. Any suitable commercially available brightener solution may be employed which cleans and brightens the aluminum shaft. From the station 12, the shafts are rinsed in water at rinse station 14 to remove any of the remaining bright dip solution therefrom. The shafts are then subsequently rinsed in a nitric 'acid rinse atstation l6 and in another water rinse at station 18.

At this stage the shaft has-been properly prepared for anodizing. The shaft is anodized in the usual manner in a sulphuric acidbath at station 20. The anodizing deposits a protective oxide film on the aluminum which provides a good surface for receiving a dyeto be subsequently applied thereto andprotecting thealuminum shaft.

After the shaft has been anodized the required extent, it is rinsed in water at station 22 and immersed in a heated dye solution at station 24. The bath of the dye solution is provided in accordance with the desired coloring of the shaft and the shafts can be colored red, blue, black, etc., for example, to match or contrast with band majorettes uniforms with which the batons will be used.

Afterthe shaft has been dyed in the heated dye solution, it is subjected to a water rinse at station 26 and a nickel acetate sealer is applied to the shaft atstation 28 to seal the surface. When the shaft is sealed ,it is rinsed in awater rinse at station 30.

baton is assembling the rubber ball and tip on the ends of the shaft at station 36.

A baton formed in accordance with the described method can take the form of the baton 38 shown in FIG. 2. The baton 38 has a design formed by cutting or grinding circular grooves 40 or rings along each end of the shaft in a symmetrical pattern. The central portion 42 of the shaft has no grooves cut therein and is of sumcient length to be readily gripped for twirling purposes.

' ferent shapes of grooves, various design effects can be The steps described heretofore provide a hard sursurface with'a high luster, and may be readily cleaned.

g The shafts are further decorated by forming designs on the shaft at station 32. The designs are formed by removing portions of the shaft surface to a depth which removes all the dye so that the aluminum shows. The surface can be removed by milling, drilling, routing, or grinding with the use of special jigs, fixtures, and equipment. The design is formed by removing the dyed surface in a pre-arranged pattern so that the resulting exposed aluminum contrasts with the dyed surface of the shaft and forms the design. More specifically, the dyed aluminum shaft is supported adjacent a tool, such as a grinding, milling, drilling. or cutting tool, and the shaft and tool arerelatively moved to remove the portions of the surface of the shaft necessary to form the desired design. Various types of designs can be applied to the surface.

The decorated shaft is then moved to an assembly station 34 where weighted members such as rivets, screws, plugs, etc. are staked in the ends of the shaft. The weighted members function to provide abutments for holding the rubber ball and tip in assembled relation on the ends of the shaft. Also, by selecting the particular weight of rivet the shaft can be readily balanced for better twirling capability. The final step in making the achieved. The grooves 40 and contrasting colored surface portion 44 have different light reflecting characteristics so that when the baton is twirled the illusion of a series of concentric rings is achieved giving the baton an illusion of being twirled at high speeds. Other designs may give other illusions but because of the glitter of the aluminum surface portions and the high luster of the contrasting dyed portions the baton when twirled gives the illusion of great speed.

The illusion of a series of concentric rings also provides a reminder grip for the person using the baton. When the baton is twirled and thrown upwardly it is important that the person twirling the baton grasp the baton as close to the rotational center of the baton as possible so that he may continue, to twirl the baton. By providing an illusion of a'series of concentric rings, the person using the baton may attempt to grasp the baton in the center of the rings and thereby grasp the baton about its center of rotation and continue to rotate the baton. This center where concentric rings do not exist is commonly known as the reminder grip.

A second embodiment of the baton of the present invention is shown in FlGS. 3-6. For ease of description, common reference numerals will be used for common parts with the suffix a appended thereto.

The baton 38a shown in FIG. 3 has a design on the aluminum shaft 46 formed by cutting or grinding circular grooves 40a or rings along each end of the shaft in a symmetrical pattern. A central portion 42a of the shaft has no grooves cut therein and is adapted to be readily gripped for twirling purposes. The aluminum shaft 46 has a uniform internal diameter through its length. I

To provide for additional strength of the aluminum shaft 46, a steel tube 50 is provided having a substantially uniform external diameter 52. The external diameter 52 and internal diameter 48 have corresponding magnitudes so that the steel tube 50 reinforces the aluminum shaft 46.

In order for the steel member 50 to provide for support of the aluminum tube 46, the outside diameter 52 is substantially the same as the diameter 48 of the aluminum tube 46. A suitable epoxy (not shown) is located between the outer diameter 52 of the member 50 and the inner diameter 48 of the tube 46 to prevent relative rotation therebetween.

As mentioned hereinabove, the steel member 50 inside of the aluminum tube 46 provides the additional strength which is sometimes desirable in the baton 38a when extreme forces are exerted thereon. It should be understood that the internal steel member 50 does not change the advantageous features of the dyed aluminum shaft but rather adds to the strength of the shaft. It should also be understood that when a shaft is required having greater strength, the thickness of the steel member 50 may be increased until it is a solid rod having no internal diameter.

On each of the ends of the baton 38a, the weighted members 54, 56 are provided. As will be hereinafter described, theseweighted members 54, 56 are of different magnitudes and serve tobalance the baton 38a so that it rotates about its geometric center. The weighted member 54 is positioned on one end of the shaft while the weighted member 56 is positioned on the other end of the shaft. The rubber ball 58 is positioned on the one end of the shaft while the tip 60 is positioned on the corresponding other end of the shaft.

For ease of description, only the weighted member 54 will be hereinafter described. It should be understood that the weighted member 56 on the other end of the shaft is similar in construction.

As seen in FIG. '4, the weighted member 54 has a head portion 62 having an opening 64 therein. The opening 64 extends to the treaded opening 66 so that a treaded fastener 76 may be received inthe treaded opening through theopening 64. The head 62 extends downwardly to a supporting surface 68 as seen in FIG. 3. The ends of the aluminum tube 46 and steel member 50 receive the side portions 70 of the expanding portion 71 until they contact the surface 68. The surface 70 is in contact with the internal-diameter of the steel tube 50. It should be understood that if the steel member 50 is designed to terminate short of the end of the shaft, the surface 70 is received by the internal diameter 48 of the aluminum tube 46.

The treaded opening 66 has a tapered configuration so as to allow for expanding of the portion 71 against the shaft as will be hereinafter described. Slot 72 is provided in the expanding portion 71 of the weighted member 54. The slot 72 allows the surface 70 to expand as the treaded member 76 as shown in FIG. 3 is treaded into the treaded opening 66. As the surface 70 expands, it grips the inside of the steel member 50 and thereby secures the weighted member 54 to the shaft. The slot 72 also allows air to escape from the center of the shaft;

To secure the ball 58 to the shaft, the surface 68 extends from the end of the shaft. When the rubber ball 58 is forced over the rounded corners 76 and consequently onto the one end of the shaft, the surface 78 of the ball member 58 engages a portion of the surface 68. The ball 58 is retained on the weighted member 54 by the locking action of the surface 68 and78.

It should be understood that the weighted member 56 is secured to the other end of the shaft in a manner similar to that hereinabove described. It should also be understood that the weighted member 56 is heavier than the weighted member 54 to compensate in the difference between the weight of the ball 58 and the weight of the tip-60. Thus, each end of the shaft is equally weighted. By so compensating for the weights of the ball and tip 58, 60 respectively the baton is balanced about the geometric center of the batonand may be twirled about the geometric center. Since the baton rotates about its geometric center a series of concentric rings are visible by rotation of the grooves 40a and dyed portion 44a of the baton about a common axis.

By providing a balanced shaft with the weighted members 54, 56 the baton 38a not eccentric and may easily be rotated about the geometric center. This allows the user of the baton to twirl it with greater ease since the center is not consequently changing as it would be if the baton were eccentrically weighted.

To decrease the tendency of the baton to roll, the ball 58 has a plurality of lobes 80 as seen in FIG. 5 positioned about the outer periphery and the tip 60 has a plurality of lobes 82 positioned about its; periphery,'as seen in FIG. 6. The number of lobes 80 on the ball 58 are sufficient to reduce the tendency of the baton to roll, yet not so numerous as to act as a circular'surface. As seen in FIG. 5, the ball 58 has a greater diameter and therefore needs more lobes 80 than the tip 60 which has a smaller diameter. Thus, the number of lobes on the ball 58 or tip 60 is directly dependent on the size of the ball 58 or tip 60.

When the baton is twirled and accidently dropped, it is imporant that the user of the baton to pick up the baton quickly if he should drop the baton. The lobes 80, 82 reduce the tendency of the baton to roll and allows the user of the baton to quickly find the baton and begin to use it again.

The present invention provides a baton shaft constructed from aluminum tubing which is anodized and dyed a'desired color. Portions of the dyed surface are then removed to expose the aluminum which contrasts with the dyed surface portion and forms a design of the shaft. Weights 54, 56 are provided to balance the shaft and a ball 58 anda tip 60 with lobes 80, 82 respectively, are provided to reduce rolling of the baton when, dropped. To provide further reinforcement of the aluminum tubing, a steel member 50 is engaged by the internal surface 48 of the aluminum tube 46.

What is claimed is: a

l. A baton comprising a lightweight corrosionresistant tubular shaft, a ball carried on one end of said shaft, two weighting members, one of which is secured in each open end of said tubular shaft, each of said members having a predetermined weight to balance said shaft for twirling, a tip carried on the other end of said shaft, said tubular shaft having a central portion providing an area to be grippedfor twirling and first and second end portions extending integrally from said central portion and carrying said ball and tip respectively, said portions being made of dyed anodized aluminum material and having a smooth easily cleaned high luster outer surface, said first andsecond end portions having grooves therein symmetrically arranged relative to said central portion, said central portion being free of grooves, each of said grooves extending to adepth greater than that of the dyeing and anodizing and exposing the bare aluminum material of the shaft which contrasts with the dyed anodized surface area of high luster, each of said grooves having abottom surface of non-anodized aluminum material located diametrically inwardly relative to the outer anodized dyed surface of the baton shaft, whereby upontwirling, the baton exhibits circular paths of travel of the grooves that indicate the location of the center of the baton,

and wherein said lightweight corrosion-resistant tubular shaft includes an outer aluminum tubular member 2. A baton comprising a shaft, a ball carried on one end of said shaft, a tip carried on the other end of said shaft, said shaft having a central portion providing an area to be gripped for twirling and first and second end portions extending from said central portion and carrying said ball and tip respectively, said shaft having an outer aluminum tubular member defining the outer surface of said shaft and a steel member inside of said outer aluminum tubular member, said first and second portions of said outer surface of said outer aluminum tubular member having a dyed anodized finish defining a smooth easily cleaned highluster outer surface, said first and second portions having grooves therein symmetrically arranged relative to said central portion and extending to a depth greater than that of the dyeing and anodizing and exposing the glittering aluminum material. of the shaft which contrasts with the dyed anodized surface areas of high luster, said central portionbeing free of grooves, said aluminum tubular member having a uniform internal diameter throughout the length of said aluminum member, said steel member having an outer diameter corresponding to the internal diameter of said aluminum member and being coextensive with said aluminum member 'to reinforce said aluminum member not only at said end portions but throughout said'central portion also.

3. A baton as defined in claim 2 and further comprising members having preselected weights secured to the opposite ends of said shaft to balance said shaft for twirling, each of said weighted members including a retaining surface and each of said ball and said tip including a complementary retaining surface corresponding to and engaging the retaining surfaces of said weighted members so that said ball and said tip are retained on said shaft by said retaining surfaces.

4. A baton as definedin claim 3 and wherein said steel member is tubular and includes an opening at each end thereof, said weighted members including an expanding section received by the openings in the ends of said steel member, said expanding section being expandable to secure said weighted member to said steel member.

5. A baton as defined in claim 2 and wherein each of said ball and said tip have a plurality of lobes distributed about the periphery thereof to reduce the tendency of said baton to roll on a surface, each of said lobes being of rounded shape at its outer extremity to preclude erratic bouncing in unpredictable directions upon dropping of the baton on a surface.

6. A baton comprising a lightweight shaft made of material having a smooth high luster outer surface and having a central portion providing an area to be gripped for twirling and first and second end portions extending from said central portion, said first and second portions having grooves therein symmetrically arranged relative to said central portion for describing circular paths of travel which visually indicate the location of the center of the baton during twirling, said central portion being free of grooves, a ball formed from rubber and carried on one end of said shaft, and a tip formed from rubber and carried on the other end of said shaft, said ball and said tip having six lobes and four lobes respectively distributed about the peripheries thereof to reduce the tendency of the baton to roll on a surface, each of said lobes having a spherical end.

7. A baton comprising a lightweight corrosionrial and having a smooth high luster outer surface and having, a central portion providing an area to be gripped for twirling and first and second end portions extending from said central portion, said first and second portions having grooves therein symmetrically arrangedrelative to said central portion for describing circular paths of travel which visually indicate the location of the center of the baton during twirling, said grooves extending to a depth greater than that of the dyeing and anodizing and exposing a bottom surface in the grooves of non-anodized aluminum material, said central portion being free of grooves, a ball formed from an elastomeric material and carried on one end of said shaft, and a tip formed from elastomeric material and carried on the other end of said shaft, said ball and said tip each having a plurality of lobes distributed about the periphery thereof to reduce the tendency of the baton to roll on a surface, each of said lobes having a rounded unpointed end, and wherein said lightweight corrosion-resistant shaft includes an outer aluminum tubular member defining the outer surface of said shaft and a steel member inside of said outer aluminum tubular member to reinforce said outer aluminum tubular member, said aluminum tubular member having a uniform internal diameter throughout the length of said aluminum member, said steel member having an outer diameter corresponding to the internal diameter of said aluminum member and reinforcing said aluminum member throughout the length of said aluminum member including the central portion thereof.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3113482 *Nov 9, 1960Dec 10, 1963Hirsch Albert W HDecorative twirling baton shaft
US3212386 *Sep 4, 1964Oct 19, 1965Sartell Donald LBaton
US3662080 *Jul 24, 1970May 9, 1972Miller Frederick JTwirling baton
GB642138A * Title not available
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 * Leedy Catalog No. 58, Leedy Drum and Tympani, Chicago, Ill., 1958, p. 31.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4383387 *Jul 30, 1981May 17, 1983Puskar Frank JTwirling baton
US4712792 *May 7, 1986Dec 15, 1987Wolfgang RogallGymnastic and playing device
US7371955 *Feb 22, 2006May 13, 2008Pearl Musical Instrument Co.Drum tuning key
US7955157 *Mar 24, 2010Jun 7, 2011Hedeen International, LlcBaton apparatus
US8550027 *Feb 17, 2011Oct 8, 2013Randall L. MayColor guard adjustable flag pole weight
Classifications
U.S. Classification84/477.00B, 984/258
International ClassificationG10G7/00
Cooperative ClassificationG10G7/00
European ClassificationG10G7/00