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Publication numberUS3811139 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 21, 1974
Filing dateOct 24, 1972
Priority dateOct 24, 1972
Publication numberUS 3811139 A, US 3811139A, US-A-3811139, US3811139 A, US3811139A
InventorsShaw K
Original AssigneeShaw K
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stretcher
US 3811139 A
Abstract
A stretcher for supporting, immobilizing and carrying an injured person without substantial postural disturbance, and a method for supporting the injured person in the stretcher. A number of elongated support slats are placed under the injured person in generally parallel relation and an elongated frame, which is box-like with open top and bottom sides, is placed over the injured person to closely surround both the person and the support slats. The slats and the person are supported in the frame by a number of rods subsequently inserted in the frame to extend across it, beneath, and generally at right-angles to the slats, the rods having end portions extending through holes in the frame and being secured against axial movement. Immobilization of the injured person is achieved with the addition of inflatable pillows placed over and around the injured person and held in position by a top panel and additional rods inserted in the frame to prevent upward movement of the pillows. The assembled stretcher can then be lifted as a unitary structure, and the injured person can be safely carried over rough terrain. Another embodiment incorporates a flatter frame and is particularly well suited for lifting bedridden persons.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 11 1 Shaw [111 3,811,139 [451 May 21, 1974 1 1 STRETCHER [76] Inventor: Kenneth W. Shaw, PO. Box 149,

Tucson, Ariz. 85702 22 Filed: Oct. 24, 1972 21 Appl. No.: 300,117

[52] US. Cl. 5/82, 5/60, 5/81 R, 128/33 [51] Int. Cl. A61g 7/10, A6lg 1/02, A47c 17/64 [58] Field of Search 5/60, 61, 81 R, 82, 86, 5/336, 348; 128/1; 27/12, 18, 19

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,609,778 10/1971 Zeiner 5/82 3,598,444 8/1971 Seiter.... 297/440 2,008,770 7/1935 Raffo 5/82 1,396,208 ll/l921 Hubbardm... 5/82 2,607,103 8/1952 Davidson 5/82 X 2,859,505 11/1958 Jarvis 5/348 R 3,449,776 6/1969 Brock 5/82 Primary Examiner-Casmir A. Nunberg Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Fulwider, Patton, Rieber, Lee & Utecht [5 7] ABSTRACT A stretcher for supporting, immobilizing and carrying an injured person without substantial postural disturbance, and a method for supporting the injured person in the stretcher. A number of elongated support slats are placed under the injured person in generally parallel relation and an elongated frame, which is box-like with open top and bottom sides, is placed over the injured person to closely surround both the person and the support slats. The slats and the person are supported in the frame by a number of rods subsequently inserted in the frame to extend across it, beneath, and generally at right-angles to the slats,.the rods having end portions extending through holes in the frame and being secured against axial movement. Immobilization of the injured person is achieved with the addition of inflatable pillows placed over and around the injured person and held in position by a top panel and additional rods inserted in the frame to prevent upward movement of the pillows. The assembled stretcher can then be lifted as a unitary structure, and the injured person can be safely carried over rough terrain. Another embodiment incorporates a flatter frame and is particularly well suited for lifting bedridden persons.

16 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures PATENTED MAY 2] i974 SHEET 2 BF 2 STRETCHER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to stretchers for lifting and transporting injured or bedridden persons whose injuries or'conditions require that their bodily positions be disturbed as little as possible.

Prior to this invention, stretchers in this field were generally either of the basket type or the orthopedic type. The former type supports the injured person in a basket-shaped apparatus of wire mesh, canvas or a more rigid material, while the latter type usually separates into two rigid halves which are slid under the injured person and reconnected to form a single unit. Both types suffer from the disadvantage that complete immobilization of the injured person once on the stretcher cannot be achieved, especially if the person is in other than a supine position, that is, lying on his back, face upward. Furthermore, the injured person is relatively unprotected from the elements by the stretcher, making it impractical for use in rescue operations over rugged terrain.

The basket type of stretcher has the further disadvantage that the injured person must first be placed in the basket, an operation difficult to perform without some disturbance of the persons position. While the orthopedic stretcher does not have this problem, it is generally limited in use to carrying persons only in the supine position.

Finally, immobilization of the injured person on these stretchers often requires the supplementary use of such devices as inflatable splints. With these, only the limbs can be immobilized, and the splint must be sized to fit the injured person. If the injury is not a broken limb, the conventional stretchers described are even less readily adaptable to immobilize the injured person. For example, where there is a multiple fracture of the persons rib cage, a loose segment of rib will move in the opposite direction to the rest of the chest when the injured person attempts to breathe, a condition known as paradoxical respiration or flail chest. The recommended first-aid treatment is to ease the person's breathing by taping a pillow firmly to his chest, a procedure in which the conventional stretcher provides little assistance.

Another type of injury not easily treated on conventional stretchers is a bleeding wound or the penetrating or sucking chest wound resulting in some degree of pneumothorax, a condition in which air is sucked into the chest cavity from outside or from a lung. It is important in such cases to apply pressure to a bleeding wound, and to close the chest wound as soon as possible, and conventional stretchers contribute little or nothing to the effective treatment of these injuries.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention resides in an improved stretcher in which an injured or bedridden person can be lifted and carried without disturbing him from the posture in which he is lying. The stretcher includes an open frame, and a number of discrete support members which are placed individually under the injured person. The stretcher frame is placed over the injured person to closely surround both the person and the support members, and then the support members are lifted and supported in the frame by support means releasably connected to the frame.

In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the frame is an open box-like structure and the support members are thin, elongated slats that can be easily slid under the injured person without disturbing his position. The frame is placed over both the injured person and the slats, and a plurality of cross-pieces are inserted through holes in the sides of the frame and passed underneath the slats, the cross-pieces being releasably connected to the frame to support the slats and the injured person in the frame.

An important feature of this embodiment is that the person can be completely immobilized within the frame by the use of inflatable or other pillows disposed about the person and retained in position by additional crosspieces inserted through the frame. Furthermore, the

person can be immobilized in any of a variety of posi-' tions, and the persons limbs can be independently supported, in a bent position if necessary, by appropriate disposition of additional cross-pieces.

The versatility of this embodiment of the stretcher as an immobilizing device makes it ideal for use in rescue operations in areas of rugged terrain where immobilization would be otherwise extremely difficult. The immobilization provided by the stretcher is so effective as to sometimes obviate the need for supplementary splints. In addition, the frame structure of the stretcher affords the injured person substantial protection from the elements and can easily be fitted with various traction devices to be applied to the injured person during transportation. i

Treatment of a bleeding wound or a flail chest condition is easily achieved in the stretcher by using an inflatable pillow held against the wound or the persons chest. Similarly, where the injury is a sucking chest wound, the wound can be closed and the person effectively immobilized either by positioning the person to lie on a pad over the wound, or by applying pressure to the padded wound from above. Transportation of persons with penetrating chest wounds, flail chest and similar conditions is thus more easily effected with the stretcher described herein than with prior stretchers.

In another embodiment of the invention, particularly suitable for lifting a bedridden person, the stretcher frame is as flat as a conventional stretcher, but still uses slats and cross-pieces to pick up the person with minimal disturbance. The stretcher may be releasably connected to a mechanical lifting device for conveniently lifting the person from his bed.

Other aspects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following detailed description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the stretcher, with the frame partly broken FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the stretcher with the injured person therein, showing how the stretcher is assembled to pick up the injured person;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a second embodiment of the invention, particularly adapted for lifting bedridden persons, the central portion being broken away for compactness of illustration;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged, fragmentary, plan view of a cross-piece latching mechanism used in the stretcher of FIG. 6, partly broken away and shown in cross-section;

FIG. 7 is an elevational view of the mechanism shown in FIG. 6, taken in the direction of the arrow 7 of FIG. 5; and

FIG. 8 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 8-8 .Of FIG. 6.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION As shown in the drawings for purposes of illustration, the invention is embodied in a stretcher (FIGS. 1-4) for transporting an injured person, typically from the site where the injury occurred to another location where further medical treatment is available. The stretcher is particularly well suited for use in mountain rescue operations in which an injured person must be carried long distances over rough terrain.

In general, the stretcher comprises a frame, indicated generally by the reference number 11, and supporting means mounted on the frame beneath the injured person 12 to support him on the stretcher. Two carrying handles 13 project from each end of the frame 11 to be grasped (as shown in phantom in FIG. 1) by those who carry the stretcher with the injured person supported therein.

In accordance with the present invention, the supporting means comprise a plurality of discrete, elongated support members 14 which can be placed individually beneath the injured person 12 in a preselected arrangement without substantial movement of the person from the position in which he is lying, and the frame 11 has an open bottom or lower side so that it can be placed over the injured person (as shown in FIG. 4) in an assembly position surrounding both the person and the support members beneath him. The stretcher also includes means for releasably securing the support members to the frame after the latter is in the assembly position, thus joining the stretcher components into a unitary structure in which the injured person is transported.

More specifically, the support members 14 are flat slats of substantially the same length asthe overall length of the stretcher, and may be composed of wood, aluminum, or any other suitable material. The combined width of the slats is somewhat less than the width of the frame, and the thickness of the slats is kept as small as is practical, to facilitate their positioning beneath the injured person.

In the preferred embodiment shown in FIGS. 14, the frame 11 is a box-like structure having an open upper side and an open lower side defined by side walls 15 and end walls 17 of substantial width, sufficient to extend upwardly well above the injured person when the frame is around him in the assembly position. The walls of the illustrative frame are composed of a suitable light, but rigid, sheet material, and are joined together and reinforced by internal and external moldings 1821 around the upper and lower edges of the side walls 15 and similar moldings 22 around the upper and lower edges of the end walls 17. The external moldings 20 at the lower edges of the side walls 15 project beyond the end walls 17 to form the carrying handles. Each end wall 17 has a plurality of holes 23 through it to allow the attachment of various traction devices (not shown) to be applied to the injured person 12 being transported in the stretcher.

In this embodiment, the means for releasably securing the slats 14 to the frame 11 comprise a plurality of cross-pieces, preferably metal rods 24. Each side wall 15 is perforated with several rows of holes 25 through which the rods may be inserted, and each rod has a head 27 on one end and is threaded on the opposite end 28, where a washer 29 and a wing-nut 30 are engageable to secure the rod in the frame 11 (FIG. 4). The internal molding 21 at the lower edge of each side wall 15 is also perforated with a row of holes 31 which are in alignment with the lower row of holes in each side wall. Since the persons weight will be usually supported by rods inserted in these lower holes, these rods are therefore afforded additional support by the internal moldings 21.

The method of inserting each rod is best understood from FIG. 2, where one of the rods 24 is shown secured by its head 27, washer 29 and wing-nut 30. Each such rod is inserted through a lower hole in one side wall, under the slats 14 placed beneath the injured person 12, and through the opposite hole in the other side wall. The rods are slightly longer than the distance between the side walls 15, so that the threaded end of an installed rod protrudes from the side wall for engagement of the washer and wing-nut. The rods may bow slightly (shown exaggerated in FIG. 2) under the supported weight of the person.

After the rods 24 have been installed to support the injured person 12 and the slats 14 in the stretcher, additional supporting slats 32 may be installed from the top of the frame 11 (FIG.'4) to provide further support for the arms of the injured person. These additional slats would be placed close to the side walls 15 and would rest on the same. rods 14 to form, with the main supporting slats 14, a substantially complete supporting bed between the two side walls.

For some types of injuries, it may be necessary to support a limb in a bent position or slightly elevated from the rest of the body. This end is achieved in the stretcher by the installation of additional rods 33 (FIGS. 1 and 2) in the frame to support the limbs of the injured person in any desired manner. By way of example, the injured persons left leg 34 is shown supported in a bent position in FIGS. 1 and 2. The additional rods 33 are inserted in appropriate holes in the side walls 15 to support the weight of the limb in the desired position, and are secured to the frame in the same manner as the rods 24under the supporting slats 14.

Complete immobilization of the injured person is achieved by placing pillows 34 around the injured person 12 to restrict his movement as is appropriate for the type of injury (FIG. 2). The pillows are preferably of the inflatable type, to apply a uniform pressure over a large surface area of the body, and are held in place by a removable top panel 35. The width of the top panel is slightly less than the space between the side walls 15, the length is such as to cover the injured person from feet to shoulders, and the material may be any suitable light, but stiff, sheet, such as wood or a plastic. Pressure is applied to the pillows 34 by a downward force on the top panel 35, and this force is maintained by a third group of rods 37 inserted through the side walls just above the top'panel 35 and secured in the frame 11 similarly to the other rods 24 and 33.

Pillows 38 near the injured persons head are held in place by a separate transparent face plate 39 of approximately the same width as the top panel 35. The face plate is transparent to afford easier observation of the injured persons condition, and is separate to allow some access to the person, to feed or treat him as is necessary, without removing the top panel 35 and thereby releasing the immobilizing pillows 34.

The frame 11 is also fitted with a removable bottom panel 40 comprising a flat, stiff sheet of wood, plastic, or some other suitable and durable material, and short side walls 41 rigidly attached to the side edges of the sheet and projecting upward at right-angles to it. The width of the bottom panel is such that the bottom panel fits with its side walls 41 over the lower outer moldings and is held in place by a plurality of screws 42 through the bottom panel side walls 41 and the lower outer moldings 20. The upper or inside face of the bottom panel is lined with a layer of soft, resilient material 43 to cushion the supporting slats l4 and thereby further support and protect the injured person 12 (FIG. 2). Attachment of the bottom panel is usually the final step in assembly of the stretcher.

For some applications of the stretcher, particularly where the injured person is to be carried a long distance, it may be desirable to attach wheels (not shown) to the stretcher frame. In some situations, it may also be desirable to provide means for carrying a bottle (not shown) for feeding the injured person intravenously or performing a blood transfusion while the person is in the stretcher.

Another embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIGS. 5-8. Corresponding elements in these figures use the same numbers as in FIGS. 1-4, except that the numbers are shown primed in FIGS. 5-8. In this embodiment, the side members 15' are much shallower, so that the frame 11 is as flat as a conventional stretcher. The side members 15 and end members 17' are hollow beams of rectangular cross-section formed integral with each other in a rectangular frame 11 with rounded corners, the length and width of the frame being sufficient to accommodate the injured person. The frame material is metal or any suitably strong substitute. There is just one row of holes through the side beams 15', but the slats l4 and rods 24 are used in the same fashion as in the deeper stretcher described above. There is no provision for the use of immobilizing pillows in this version, and the stretcher is intended for use where the injured person is to be lifted for short periods of time and where the frame 11 can be safely lifted and held in a substantially horizontal attitude.

Because of this intended use, each of the rods 24' is retained in the frame 11' by means of a quick-release latching mechanism 50. The latching mechanism is shown in detail in FIGS. 6-8. Each of the hollow side beams 15' has an inside face 51 and an outside face 52. The outside face of one of the side walls has a square opening 53 therethrough, spaced laterally and slightly above each of the holes 25 through which a rod 24 protrudes. A latching pin 54 of generally square crosssection and length less than the hollow space between the faces 51-52 of the side beams 15, protrudes through the opening 53 in the outside face 52 and is prevented from completely emerging from the opening by a head 55 on the inside end of the latching pin 54. There is an access hole 57 through the inside face 51 opposite the square opening 53 in the outside face 52. The access hole 57 is covered by a removable access plate 58, and a compression spring 59 is positioned to bear on the access plate 58 and the headed end of the latching pin 54 to urge the latter through the square opening 53.

A retaining arm 60 is pivotally mounted by one end on the outside face 52 of the side beam 15', at a point laterally spaced from each rod hole 25 so that the rod hole is between the pivot point and the square opening, and has a recess 61 in an otherwise substantially straight edge 62 to engage a circumferential groove 63 cut in the protruding end of the rod 24'. As the pivoted arm 60 is moved into engagement with the groove 63, a portion of the arm near its free end 64 makes sliding contact with a convex face 65 of the latching pin 54, forcing the latter inward against the spring 59 and thus allowing the arm 60 to swing across the square opening 53 and into engagement with the groove 63 in the rod 24'.

When this position is reached, the square opening is just uncovered and the latching pin 54 springs out to latch the retaining arm 60 in locking position. Each rod 24' has a head 67 on its end opposite the grooved end, to further prevent axial movement of the rod 24. The arm 60 is unlatched by manually depressing the latching pin 54 into the square opening 53 to allow the arm 60 to swing away from the rod 24', thus releasing the latter for axial movement.

Rigidly attached to the frame 11 are a plurality of eyebolts 68 for attaching lifting lines 69 for lifting the stretcher with a mechanical lifting device (not shown). Accordingly, the stretcher can be usefully employed to lift injured or bedridden persons from their beds, typically in hospitals, or in homes where a mechanical lifting device is available.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that the stretcher in the two forms shown herein for the purpose of illustration is eminently suitable as a device for lifting, im mobilizing and transporting injured and bedridden persons. Furthermore, the design is such that the stretchers can be ruggedly but relatively inexpensively constructed. It will also be seen that, while two particular forms of the invention have been illustrated and described, various modifications can be made without de-- parting from the spirit and scope of the invention.

I claim: 7

1. A stretcher for immobilizing and transporting an injured person, comprising:

a group of separate elongated slats adapted to be placed individually beneath the injured person in closely spaced, generally parallel relation without substantial disturbance of said injured person;

an elongated box-like frame having connected longitudinal side walls and transverse end walls of substantial height defining open upper and lower sides and sized to be placed over said injured person and to closely surround said group of slats, said side walls having an array of pairs of transversely aligned holes therein;

a plurality of cross-pieces extending transversely across said lower open side beneath said slats, each having opposite end portions disposed in the aligned holes of one of said pairs; and means releasably securing said cross-pieces to said frame, whereby each of said cross pieces is restrained from axial movement after insertion through a first hole of one of said pairs of holes, beneath said slats and through the remaining hole of said pair. 2. The stretcher defined in claim 1, wherein: said cross-pieces are metal rods; and said securing means include:

an enlarged head formed integrally with one end of each of said rods; and

means releasably attached to the opposite end of each of said rods for securing each of said rods from axial movement.

3. The stretcher defined in claim 1, further comprisa plurality of pillows arranged about the injured person; and

pillow retaining means for holding said pillows securely against said injured person in said frame, thereby inhibiting possibly injurious movement or bleeding of the injured person during transportation.

4. The stretcher defined in claim 1, further comprisa plurality of limb-supporting cross-pieces extending transversely across said frame, each having opposite end portions disposed in the aligned holes of one of said pairs of holes in said side walls, and positioned in said frame in a preselected arrangement to support a limb of said injured person in a desired position; and

means releasably securing said cross-pieces to said frame.

5. The stretcher defined in claim 1, further comprisimmobilization means for preventing bleeding and significant movement of said injured person in said frame.

6. The stretcher defined in claim 1, further comprisa bottom frame panel removably attached to said lower open side and having an upper layer of soft resilient material to cushion said supporting slats and thereby further support and protect said injured person.

7. A stretcher for lifting an injured person without substantial postural disturbance, comprising:

a group of separate elongated slats adapted to be placed individually beneath the injured person in closely spaced, generally parallel relation without substantial disturbance of said injured person;

an elongated frame having end beams and first and second side beams connected together in a generally rectangular shape sized to be placed around said injured person and to closely surround said group of slats, said side beams each having a like row of holes therein and said holes being aligned transversely in pairs across said frame;

a plurality of cross-pieces extending transversely across said frame beneath said slats, each having opposite end portions disposed in the aligned holes of one of said pairs; and

means releasably securing said cross-pieces to said frame; whereby each of said cross-pieces is relimb-supporting strained from axial movement after insertion through a first hole of one of said pairs of holes, be-

neath said slats and through the remaining hole of said pair.

8. The stretcher defined in claim 7, wherein:

said cross-pieces are metal rods each having means on one end to prevent axial movement through said first side beam and a circumferential groove around the other end portion; and

said securing means includes for each rod:

a retaining arm pivotally mounted on said second side beam on an axis parallel with said rods and having an edge recessed to engage with the groove of the corresponding rod and thereby prevent axial movement thereof;

a latching pin having a convex face and a flat face and normally protruding from an opening in said second side beam to abut with said flat face against said retaining arm, thereby preventing rotation of said retaining arm from a position of engagement with the grooved rod; and

a compression spring positioned to urge said latching pin outwards through said opening in said second side beam, said spring being compressed as said retaining arm is moved slidably across said convex face of the latching pin to reach said position of engagement with the grooved rod.

9. The stretcher defined in claim 8, further comprismeans for releasably attaching a lifting mechanism to said frame.

10. A stretcher for immobilizing and moving an injured person, comprising:

a plurality of discrete support members adapted to be placed individually beneath the injured person in a preselected supporting arrangement without substantial disturbance of said injured person;

a frame having at least one open side and sized to be placed over said injured person and to closely surround said support members in said preselected supporting arrangement; and

means releasably connected to said frame for supporting said support members on said frame after the latter has been placed over said injured person and around the support members, thereby joining the frame and the supporting members into a unitary structure in which to move the injured person in a substantially undisturbed posture.

11. The stretcher as defined in claim 10, wherein:

said support members are elongated slats; and

said frame has two side members having a plurality of pairs of transversely aligned holes therein; and

said means for supporting said slats in said frame comprise: 1 a plurality of cross-pieces extending transversely across said frame beneath said slat, each having opposite end portions disposed in the aligned holes of one of said pairs; and means releasably securing said cross-pieces to said frame, whereby each of said cross-pieces is restrained from axial movement after insertion through a first hole of one of said pairs of holes, beneath said slats and through the remaining hole of said pair. 12. The stretcher as defined in claim 11, wherein: said cross-pieces are metal rods; and

said securing means include for each rod an enlarged head formed integrally with one end of each of said rods and means releasably attached to the opposite end for securing each of said rods from axial movesubstantial disturbance of the injured person; an elongated box-like frame having connected longitudinal side walls and transverse end walls of substantial height defining open upper and lower sides and sized to be placed over said injured person and to closely surround said group of slats, said side walls having an array of pairs of transversely aligned holes therein;

plurality of metal rods extending transversely across said lower open side beneath said slats, each having opposite end portions disposed in the aligned holes of one of said pairs; means releasably securing said rods to said frame, in-

cluding an enlarged head formed integrally with one end of each of said rods and means releasably attached to the opposite end of each of said rods for securing each of said rods from axial movement, whereby each of said rods is restrained from axial movement after insertion through a first hole of one of said pairs of holes, beneath said slats and through the remaining holes of said pair; a plurality of pillows arranged about the injured person; and pillow retaining means for holding said pillows setioned in said frame immediately above said top panel to resist upward movement of said panel and said immobilizing pillows, and

rod securing means for each of said additional rods,

ment. 5 including an enlarged head formed integrally 13. A stretcher for immobilizing and transporting an with one end of each of said additional rods and injured person, comprising: means releasably attached to the opposite end a group of separate elongated slats adapted to be for securing each of said additional rods from placed individually beneath the injured person in axial movement.

closely spaced, generally parallel relation without 0 14. The stretcher defined in claim 13, wherein said pillow retaining means further includes:

a transparent face plate positioned to retain those of said pillows adjacent to said injured persons head and secured by ones of said additional rods. 15. A method of supporting an injured person in a stretcher without substantial postural disturbance, comprising the steps of:

individually placing a group of discrete support members beneath the injured person in a preselected supporting arrangement without substantial disturbance of said injured person;

placing over said person to closely surround said group of support members an elongated stretcher frame having first and second side members with a plurality of pairs of transversely aligned holes therein;

inserting a plurality of cross-pieces through holes in said first side member, under said slats, and through corresponding holes in said second side member, thereby supporting said injured person and said support members in the stretcher frame; and

securing said rods in said frame.

16. The method defined in claim 15, further comprising the step of immobilizing said injured person in said stretcher frame, to prevent further injury or bleeding, by:

curely against said injured person in said frame, ineluding a partial top panel placed in said frame through said open upper side to bear down on said pillows, said top panel being narrower than said open upper side for easy insertion in said frame, and substantially shorter than said open upper side to avoid covering said injured persons face,

pairs of holes in said side walls, and each posidisposing a plurality of pillows around and over said injured person after said person is supported in said stretcher frame;

securing said pillows in position with a partial top panel placed over the pillows; and

inserting a plurality of additional cross-pieces through corresponding holes in said side members to resist upward movement of said top panel and said pillows.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3921231 *May 2, 1974Nov 25, 1975Ferno WashingtonCombination adjustable break-away scoop stretcher and extrication device
US4023219 *Sep 24, 1973May 17, 1977Infranor S.A.Nuclear accident carrier
US5018226 *Aug 19, 1988May 28, 1991William Price WilliamsApparatus and method for transporting an injured person
US5359740 *Jan 31, 1991Nov 1, 1994Bryn Mawr Rehabilitation HospitalPatient restraint bed
US5829078 *Sep 2, 1997Nov 3, 1998Rivers; Gregory W.Rescue shuttle
US8261383Aug 12, 2008Sep 11, 2012Airbus Operations, S.L.Device for rescue from the interior of a confined space through a manhole, method of utilization thereof and uses
US20130227790 *Apr 18, 2013Sep 5, 2013Kaercher Futuretech GmbhPortable conveying device for patients
EP0142475A2 *Oct 13, 1984May 22, 1985Enzo Alessandro BetStretcher for lifting injured people without need of moving them
WO2009095510A1 *Dec 9, 2008Aug 6, 2009Airbus Espana SlDevice for rescuing people from a small enclosed space via manholes and method for using and uses of same
Classifications
U.S. Classification5/628, 5/629
International ClassificationA61G1/003, A61G1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61G1/00, A61G1/003
European ClassificationA61G1/003, A61G1/00