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Publication numberUS3811438 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 21, 1974
Filing dateJul 24, 1972
Priority dateMar 30, 1972
Publication numberUS 3811438 A, US 3811438A, US-A-3811438, US3811438 A, US3811438A
InventorsEconomou G
Original AssigneeEconomou G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adhesive tapes and bandages
US 3811438 A
Abstract
Adhesive tapes and bandages comprising a flexible backing with an adhesive portion distributed and adhered thereon in the form of adhesive layers alternately spaced with regions of lesser adhesiveness therebetween, each region of lesser adhesiveness generally of a width less than each adjacent layer of adhesive, with each region having a minimum width of about 0.02 inches.
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Unlted States Patent 1 1 1111 3,811,438 Economou May 21, 1974 1 ADHESIVE TAPES AND BANDAGES 3,085,572 4/1963 Blackfol'd 128/156 3,245,855 4/1966 Stenvall 128/156 X [76] Inventor: g f g ggg 8 Elm 3,528,417 9/1970 Gardmer et a1 128/156 or on, s.. [22] Filed: July 24, 1972 Primary Examiner-Richard A. Gaudet Assistant Examiner.l. Yasko [21] Appl' 274449 Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Richard P. Crowley Related US. Application Data [63] Continuation-impart of Sen-No. 239,688, March 30, [57] ABSTRACT 1972, abandoned.

Adhesive tapes and bandages c0mpr1s1ng a flex1ble 52 U.S. c1. 128/156 backing with adheSiYePOFtiO" distributed and [51] Int. Cl A611 15/00 hered thereon m the form of adhesive layers alter [58] Field Of Search 128/156 nately SPaCed with regions of lesser adhesiveness therebetween, each region of lesser adhesiveness gen- 56] References Cited erally of a width less than each adjacent layer of adhe- UNITED STATES PATENTS sive, with each region having a minimum width of be t0.02' h 2,399,545 4/1946 Davis 128/156 a u mc es 3,073,304 1/1963 Schaarn... 128/156 13-Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PATENTEDMAY 21 W 3.811.438

SHEU 1 BF 2 PRIOR ART TAPE FIG.

FIG. 2.

FIG. 3.

FIG. 4.

PATENIEBHAY 21 1974 l3 81 L438 sum 2 or 2 FNO ADHESIVE TADHESIVE PRIOR ART TAPE 3 INCHES 1 ADHESIVE TAPES AND BANDAGFB REFERENCE TO PRIOR APPLICATION This application is a continuation-in-part application of'U.S. Ser. No. 239,688, filed Mar. 30, I972 now abandoned.

FIELD OF INVENTION This invention relates to adhesive tapes and bandages, and particularly to improved adhesive arrangements therefor.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Conventionaladhesive tapes are available in many types, sizes and shapes, comprising a functional or decorative flexible backing of fabric, paper, plastic, or similar material generally with a somewhatsmooth adhesive coating thereon which is typically pressuresensitive. Other types may, however, include adhesives activated by solvent or heat. In adhesive bandages, an absorbent pad or dressing is provided, with marginal adhesive portions for securing the pad over the intended surface. Strip bandages are typically removed by pulling an edge of a marginal portion so that tape and then pad. and then tape are successively removed. The removal of conventional tapes and bandages with a continuous somewhat smooth adhesive surface very often causes sudden pain or discomfort to the user.

Commercially available bandages and surgical dressings are normally packaged in disposable envelopes and are provided with protective release-coated facings which are removed so as to expose the adhesive prior to use. In adhesive tapes, protective facings are not generally used, except to permit the material to be printed. punched or otherwise manipulated.

US. Pat. No. 2,399,545 shows an adhesive tape char; acterized by equally spaced indents along the-outer edges in order to tear the tape across such indents. This prior art patent also facilitates tape removal by reducing relative to conventional tapes up to fifty percent of the adhesive surface, and provides for various adhesive/no adhesive layers.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is an object of this invention to provide improved adhesive tapes and bandages which are readily removable with reduced pain or discomfort to the user.

Another object is to provide tapes and bandages with regions of lesser adhesiveness which improve air ventilation and circulation adjacent the skin, while still providing satisfactory adhesion. A further object is to provide a method of converting conventional adhesive tapes and bandages to the improved tapes and bandages of this invention.

The invention features an adhesive tape comprising a backing and a plurality of adhesive layers distributed andadhered to said backing. These layers are alternately spaced with regions of lesser adhesiveness therebetween for applications including the securing of an absorbent pad or dressing about a wound. The adhesive layers and regions of lesser adhesiveness alternate along the tape in theexpected direction of removal from areas adjacent a wound. The criteria of design critical to this invention are chiefly that each region of lesser adhesiveness generally be of width less than each adjacent layer of adhesive and that the minimum width 2 of each region of lesser adhesiveness be approximately 0.02 inches. I

In a preferred strip bandage embodiment, the adhesive layers extend across the entire width of the tape as do the regions of lesser adhesiveness, the adhesive layers and regions of lesser adhesiveness being in the form of alternating parallel stripes. These stripes are preferably of rectangular shape and substantially perpendicular to the longitudinal edges of the tape.

Additionally, tapes with striped layers of adhesive, as

constructed according to theinvention, may provide improved holding for particular combining or supporting applications. These tapes may be double-faced; i.e., adhesive on both sides.

Other objects, features and advantages will be apparent to one skilled in the art from the following description of preferred embodiments of the invention, taken together with the attached drawings thereof, in which:

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic plan view of a conventional adhesive strip bandage, with a portion of the somewhat smooth adhesive layer removed to display the backing strip;

FIG. 2 is a diagrammatic plan view of an adhesive strip bandage constructed in accordance with this in- FIG. 6 is a schematic vertically enlarged crosssectional side view of a tape of this invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS FIG. I shows a prior art conventional adhesive strip bandage 10 which comprises an absorbent pad 12 (typically, a gauze material) secured to a'tape backing strip 14 with opposed marginal portions 16 and thin edge portions 18 having a continuous somewhat smooth pressure-sensitive adhesivesurface. This bandage is removed by grasping edge 20a of marginal portion 16 and stripping off the contacted bandage from edge 20a to opposing edge 20b.

FIG. 2 shows my improved adhesive strip bandage which similarly contains an absorbent pad 12 and a tape backing strip 14 with opposed marginal portions 26 and edge portions 27 having pressure-sensitive adhesive. Each marginal portion 26, and edge portions 27, however, contain a plurality of generally parallel layers 28 of adhesive and a plurality of generally parallel regions 30 of lesser adhesiveness alternating therebetween, so that layers 28 and regions 30 form a segmented adhesive portion. The regions 30 may be uncoated regions of the tape backingstrip, or an adhesive mixture of lesser adhesivenessthan that in layers 28, or an adhesive, such as that in layers 28, covered with a coating which renders it substantially inert, or permanent facings of lesser adhesiveness overlying and adhering to a somewhat smooth adhesive surface beneath. In all of these constructions, the resultant adhesive portion consists of adhesive layers alternately spaced with regions of lesser adhesiveness therebetween. My adhesive bandage comprising a tape of segmented adhesive portions as in FIG. 2 is removed by pulling an edge 32 of a marginal portion-26 where removal, in fact, is segmented between each successive layer 28 and region 30. The frequencies of stripping in removal are determined by selected adhesive layers which may be of equal, as shown, or of varied'dimensions and the selected regions of lesser adhesiveness which may also be of equal, as shown, or of varied dimensions. Strain upon the contacted skin during removal is thus relieved between each successive adhesive layer and region of lesser adhesiveness, resulting in reduced pain or discomfort to the user.

Satisfactory results are obtained using a width equal to 0.04 inches for each region of lesser adhesiveness with widths of adjacent layers of adhesive equal to 0.10 inches. With such a construction wherein one stripping cycle extends in the direction of removal, from the leading edge of one region of lesser adhesiveness to the corresponding edge of the following region of lesser adhesiveness, one obtains a spatial frequency of stripping equal to approximately v7 cycles per inch. Itshould be noted that these spatial frequencies of stripping need not be constant over any interval greater than one cycle. An expected minimum width for anyregion of lesser adhesiveness is 0.02 inches and the width of any layer of adhesive should not generally exceed 0.25

- inches. A region can have one-or more subdivisions having varying degrees of lesser adhesiveness; i.e., the region need not be uniform in lesser adhesiveness; e.g., a region may have no adhesive in part, and also in part, lesser adhesiveness than an adjacent layer in part.

For providing removal as according to the present invention, the lowerlimit for a constant spatial frequency of stripping over a 1-inch interval is approximately 4 cycles per inch, the upper limit being approximately 25 cycles per' inch. Of course, the invention is not limited to spatial frequencies less than 25 cycles per inch-and may also comprise several different frequencies or ranges of frequencies as already indicated.-

A plurality of ventilation zones across the width of the tape is inherently provided at the regions of lesser adhesiveness, allowing air to circulate more freely about the skin. In prior art conventional bandages, perforations provided through the adhesive and tape backing for such purposes are not interconnected to allow a flow of air between them. Such perforations may, however, also be provided in the embodiment of my invention to provide more effective ventilation. Adhesive bandages and adhesive tapesconstructed according to the invention will additionally provide better body contouring with less strain during movement by gathering of some of the backing material within the regions of lesser adhesiveness.

F IG. 3 shows an adhesive tape constructed in accordance with the present invention with regions of lesser adhesiveness 40 alternately spacedwith adhesive layers 42 therebetween. It will be seen that removal of this tape offersJhe-same advantages as stated for the bandage in FIG. 2. V

.FIG. 4 shows an alternate embodiment of an adhesive strip bandage 44 with an absorbent pad 12 and marginal adhesive portions 46, each of which comprises a series of shortened stripes 48 of lesser adhesiveness. Such bandages offer many of the advantages of the bandage of FIG. 2, particularly ease of removal.

FIG. 5 shows a prior art adhesive tape drawn as a composite of the text and FIGS. 2 and 4 of US. Pat. No. 2,399,545 by B. E. Davis, wherein removal is facilitated by reducing up to 50% of the adhesive surface relative to conventional tapes. This prior art adhesive tape has regions of no adhesive with edge indents for tearing across the tape at prescribed lengths generally indicated asidethe indents on the tape backing. Iridents are uniformly staggered along opposite edges at approximately k inch intervals. Davis only considered tapes having reduced adhesive with the tape shown in FIG. 5 resulting in a constant low spatial frequency of approximately 2 cycles per linear inch. Davis was not aware of the phenomenon of higher frequencies of stripping with associated narrow regions of lesser adhesiveness which is the basis of this invention. The unique removal characteristics of my tape are achieved only at higher frequencies of stripping with regions of lesser adhesiveness contributing to narrow stripping pulses where each region is generally of width less than each adjacentlayer of adhesive, with each region having a minimum width of about 0.02 inches.

The spatial frequency exhibited in the Davis tapes (FIG. 5) is low, while conventional tapes and bandages (FIG. 1) are of zero frequency. My invention comprises an adhesive tape or bandage having high spatial frequencies; e.g., about 4 to 25 cycles per inch, but preferably, 5 to 12 cycles per inch, and in addition, my tapes are characterized by narrow pulse widths. l have found that the combination of higher frequencies with narrow pulse widths provides a remarkable degree of diminution of pain or discomfort to a subject removing such adhesive tapes.

FIG. 6 is a schematic vertically enlarged crosssectional side view of a tape of this invention wherein a conventional tape has been overprinted or coated tional tapes; i.e., tape having a continuous adhesive layer, and adhering them in an adhesive-to-adhesive manner as illustrated in FIG. 6. The tapes of this embodiment comprise a flexible backing with a somewhat smooth adhesive portion or layer with permanent facings; e.g., of thin backing or sheet material of no or lesser adhesiveness overlying and adhering to the adhesive portion. r

My invention has been described in connection with adhesivetape; however, the inventive concepts herein may be employed on any flexible backing having an adhesive coating, and the term adhesive tape" comprises adhesive bandages, gauze rolls and elastic bandages coated with an adhesive coating, etc..

Other embodiments will occur to those skilled in'the art and are within the following claims. 7

What is claimed is:

1. An adhesive tape comprising a backing and a plurality of adhesive layers and a plurality of regions of adhesive oflesser adhesiveness distributed and adhered to said backing, the layers adhered with the regions of lesser adhesiveness between such layers, the regions and layers successively alternating along the backing and positioned approximately perpendicular to the longitudinal edges of the tape, each layer and each region characterized generally by a uniform width and having a minimum width of about 0.02 inches.

2. The adhesive tape of claim 1 wherein the width of each or said layers of adhesive does not exceed 0.25 inches.

3. The adhesive tape of claim 1 wherein said regions extend across the entire width of said backing.

4. The adhesive tape of claim 1 wherein said regions extend less than across the entire width of said backing.

8. The adhesive tape of claim 1 wherein said regions include a flexible facing adhered to an underlying continuous somewhat smooth adhesive layer.

9. The adhesive tape of claim 1 wherein said regions include a flexible facing composed of the backing material adhered by adhesive-to-adhesive contact with an underlying somewhat smooth adhesive layer.

10. The adhesive tape of claim 1 wherein the width of each of said regions of lesser adhesiveness is about 0.04 inches.

11. The adhesive tape of claim 1 wherein the regions of lesser adhesiveness vary in adhesiveness within each of the regions.

12. The adhesive tape of claim 1 wherein the regions and layers extend across the entire width of the tape, and the regions and layers are in the form of alternating, parallel and generally rectangular shapes, all regions and layers being of the same width.

13. An adhesive tape comprising a backing and a plurality of adhesive layers and a plurality of regions of lesser adhesiveness distributed and adhered to said backing, the layers adhered with the regions of lesser adhesiveness between such layers, the regions and layers successively alternating along the backing and positioned approximately perpendicular to the longitudinal edges of the tape, each layer and each region characterized generally by a uniform width and having a minimum width of about 0.02 inches, the number of said layers or regions per linear inch of tape being from 4 to about 25, the regions extending across the entire width of said backing, and wherein said regions of lesser adhesiveness comprise an adhesive of lesser adhe siveness than the adhesive of said layers, the tape including an absorbent body portion secured thereon.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2399545 *Nov 18, 1942Apr 30, 1946Bernard E DavisAdhesive tape
US3073304 *Aug 8, 1960Jan 15, 1963Kendall & CoPerforated adhesive tape and bandage formed therewith
US3085572 *Oct 6, 1961Apr 16, 1963Johnson & JohnsonTape
US3245855 *Jan 18, 1962Apr 12, 1966Stenvall Carl BMethod for making adhesive bandage
US3528417 *Sep 7, 1967Sep 15, 1970Johnson & JohnsonWound release dressing
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3878843 *Dec 22, 1972Apr 22, 1975Morgan Adhesives CoSurgical drape with edge grips and method
US3885559 *Mar 29, 1974May 27, 1975Economou George JProcess for the reduction of pain in the removal of adhesive tapes and bandages
US4010753 *Feb 19, 1976Mar 8, 1977Johnson & JohnsonDisposable diaper having adhesive tab fasteners with built-in release system
US4058125 *Jun 23, 1976Nov 15, 1977Johnson & JohnsonForce distributing adhesive tape tab for disposable diapers
US4067337 *Feb 19, 1976Jan 10, 1978Johnson & JohnsonRe-usable tape tab for disposable diapers
US4260659 *Jun 18, 1979Apr 7, 1981Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyPressure-sensitive tape having a plurality of adhesive layers
US4374883 *Oct 15, 1981Feb 22, 1983Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyPolyurethane backing with pressure sensitive adhesive layer
US4513739 *Feb 15, 1983Apr 30, 1985Howmedica, Inc.Wound dressing
US4743249 *Jun 10, 1987May 10, 1988Ciba-Geigy Corp.Dermal and transdermal patches having a discontinuous pattern adhesive layer
US4926850 *Nov 30, 1988May 22, 1990Sherwood Medical CompanyWound dressing
US5074293 *May 4, 1990Dec 24, 1991Sherwood Medical CompanyWound dressing having peeling-force varying release liners
US5194299 *Dec 31, 1986Mar 16, 1993Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyRepositionable pressure-sensitive adhesive sheet material
US5244457 *Mar 23, 1992Sep 14, 1993The Kendall CompanyVented wound dressing
US5618282 *Oct 16, 1995Apr 8, 1997Kimberly-Clark CorporationRemoval aids for adhesively secured absorbent articles
US5738939 *Sep 20, 1996Apr 14, 1998Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyIncludes more than one adhesive; adhesive tape having longitudinal dimension that far exceeds its width
US6213993Jun 7, 1996Apr 10, 2001Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Having absorbent core with surface designed to be positioned adjacent a wearer's body,a pressure sensitive adhesive of given rheological property secured bodyfacing surface
US6570051 *Jul 14, 2000May 27, 2003Wallace J. BeaudryMethod for using a dressing mechanism
US6603051Jul 14, 2000Aug 5, 2003Wallace J. BeaudryNasal epidermal lifting mechanism
US6768039Jul 14, 2000Jul 27, 2004Wallace J. BeaudryNasal epidermal lifting mechanism
US6890344Nov 1, 2002May 10, 2005Scion Cardiovascular, Inc.Positively charged biocompatible substance, such as biopolymers of glucosamine, combine with negatively charged blood cells
US6982359Jul 14, 2000Jan 3, 2006Beaudry Wallace JNasal epidermal lifting mechanism
US7022891Apr 26, 2002Apr 4, 2006Wallace J BeaudryDressing and an epidermal positioning mechanism and method for using same
US7048706 *Jun 4, 2003May 23, 2006Cea Beverly VHypoallergenic bandage
US7067710Jul 14, 2000Jun 27, 2006Beaudry Wallace Jto provide an increased flow rate of gas through (inhaled and exhaled) the nasal passage, e.g., a nasal dilator; strip of flexible material, end portions, middle portion, adhesive material, resilient spring structures extending through the flexible strip, and a flap integral with the middle portion.
US7186878Jan 22, 2004Mar 6, 2007Beaudry Wallace JMethod of positioning the epidermis
US7456332Dec 29, 2004Nov 25, 2008Wallace J BeaudryDressing and an epidermal positioning mechanism and method for using same
US7541510Jun 4, 2004Jun 2, 2009Beaudry Wallace JNasal epidermal lifting mechanism
US8026405Dec 29, 2004Sep 27, 2011Wallace J BeaudryDressing and an epidermal positioning mechanism and method for using same
US8115049Oct 14, 2008Feb 14, 2012Wallace J BeaudryDressing and an epidermal positioning mechanism and method for using same
US8188330Aug 14, 2007May 29, 2012Wallace J BeaudryDressing and an epidermal positioning mechanism and method for using same
US8624076May 17, 2012Jan 7, 2014Wallace J BeaudryDressing and an epidermal positioning mechanism and method for using same
EP0120570A1Feb 7, 1984Oct 3, 1984Pfizer Hospital Products Group, Inc.Wound dressing
EP0371808A2 *Nov 30, 1989Jun 6, 1990Sherwood Medical CompanyWound dressing
EP0455895A2 *Sep 12, 1990Nov 13, 1991Facile TechnologiesModified pressure sensitive tape
WO2003041564A2 *Nov 13, 2002May 22, 2003Raymond DiazMethod for effecting hemostasis
WO2003090791A2 *Apr 7, 2003Nov 6, 2003Wallace J BeaudryDressing and an epidermal positioning mechanism and method for using same
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/55
International ClassificationA61F13/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/0203
European ClassificationA61F13/02B