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Publication numberUS3811442 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 21, 1974
Filing dateMar 23, 1972
Priority dateMar 23, 1972
Publication numberUS 3811442 A, US 3811442A, US-A-3811442, US3811442 A, US3811442A
InventorsA Maroth
Original AssigneeA Maroth
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hypodermic syringe holder and applicator
US 3811442 A
Abstract
A holder-applicator device for a needle-carrying hypodermic syringe by which there is greatly facilitated the introduction of the hypodermic needle into animal tissue or flesh. The device has a motor for rotatably mounting the syringe body in such a way that the needle thereof projects at a forward location and can be conveniently applied to the desired area. The motor includes a battery supply for the same, by which a turning, driving force is supplied to the syringe and needle to effect a rapid turning of the same about their common axis. Such turning of the needle enables it to penetrate into animal tissue or flesh much more effectively than heretofore and with a minimum of axial force being required, thereby greatly reducing discomfort or pain. Upon penetration of the needle being effected, the motor is made inoperative. Thereafter the injection is effected by the usual operation of depressing the plunger of the syringe. Further, the hypodermic needle differs from existing needles in that it has a sharp, conical solid point, and in that the discharge openings of the needle are in the side walls thereof disposed immediately behind the solid conical point.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

HYPODERMIC SYRINGE HOLDER AND APPLICATOR [76] Inventor: Arthur M. Maroth, Grumman Hill Rd., Wilton, Conn. 06897 221 Filed: Mar. 23, 1972 [21] Appl, No.: 237,440

[52] U.S. C1 128/218 R, 128/305, 128/DIG. 1 [51] Int. Cl. A61m 5/18, A61b 17/32 [58] Field of Search .."128/2 B, 218 R, 218 A, l28/DIG. l, 305, 310, 347, 221; 32/26-31; BIO/DIG. 8, 59,50; 30/133, 500, 240

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 824,686 6/1906 Daniel 99/532 2,525,329 10/1950 Wyzenbeek.... 128/347 3,127,894 4/1964 Smith ..'l28/347 3,173,417 3/1965 Horner..... 128/305 3,120,845 2/1964 Horner 128/305 3,107,101 10/1963 -Garnier et-al 32/26 X 3,384,085 5/1968 Hall 128/305 3,306,502 2/1967 Harris, Jr. 128/218 R X 3,225,760 12/1965 Di Cosola 128/218 R X 2,317,648 4/1943 Siqueland 32/26 X 3,618,611 11/1971 Urban 128/305 2,773,501 12/1956 Young 128/221 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1,078,958 3/1960 Germany 128/310 745,957 5 /l933 1 France 128/218 A 1111 3,811,442 1451 May21, 1974 Primary Examiner-Richard A. Gaudet Assistant Examiner-J. C. McGowan Attorney, Agent, or Firm-H. Gibner Lehmann; K. Gibner Lehmann 5 7] ABSTRACT A holder-applicator device for a needle-carrying hypodermic syringe by which there is greatly facilitated the introduction of the hypodermic needle into animal tissue or flesh. The device has a motor for rotatably mounting the syringe body in such a way that the needle thereof projects at a forward location and can be conveniently applied to the desired area. The motor includes a battery supply for the same, by which a turning, driving force is supplied to the syringe and needle to effect a rapid turning of the same about their common axis. Such turning of the needle enables it to penetrate into animal tissue or flesh much more effectively than heretofore and with a minimum of axial force being required, thereby greatly reducing discomfort or pain. Upon penetration of the needle being effected, the motor is made inoperative. Thereafter the injection is effected by the usual operation of depressing the plunger of the syringe. Further, the hypodermic needle differs from existing needles in that it has a'sharp, conical solid point, and in that the discharge openings of the needle are in the side walls thereof disposed immediately behind the solid conical point.

6 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures I'Il11 Ii WI/III HYPODERMIC SYRINGE HOLDER AND APPLICATOR BACKGROUND This invention relates to the field of hypodermic injections utilizing syringes and hypodermic needles, and more particularly to holder-applicator devices for such syringes, which are intended to facilitate the insertionf the needle into animal or like tissue. I-Ieretofore, various structures have been proposed and produced for facilitating the insertion of a hypodermic needle in animal tissue, and for facilitating the administration of fluid from a syringe carrying such needle. Some of these prior devices incorporated large and cumbersome holders which had for their object the axial advancing of the hypodermic needle under appreciable power, so as to forcibly inject it into the tissue or flesh. The theory behind such devices was that if the needle could be positively, forcibly advanced (in some cases very quickly) into the flesh it would either reduce the attendant pain or else speed up and make easier the introduction of the needle from the standpoint of the operator. While it was thought that, by the use of these prior power-operated holders or carriers, the giving of hypodermic injections was aided, there still existed a number of drawbacks. The holders or carriers were large and cumbersome, and in spite of a high speed of insertion as effected in some instances there still was appreciable attendant pain as well as difficulty in effecting an accurate placement of the needle in the exact desired location. Moreover, the prior devices were relatively expensive, and in many instances would not conveniently fit into a small carrying case such as is commonly utilized by doctors.

SUMMARY The above disadvantages and drawbacks of prior power-operated hypodermic syringe holders are obviated by the present invention, which has for its main object the provision of an improved means for facilitating the introduction of a hypodermic needle into animal tissue in such a way that there is the least amount of discomfort to the patient and also the least amount of damage to the tissue.

A related object of the invention is to provide an improved hypodermic syringe holder-applicator as above characterized, wherein an especially high degree of accuracy is possible in placing the needle in the exact desired location, irrespective of the make-up of the tissue or flesh.

These objects are accomplished by the provision of a novel hand-held device characterized by means for rotatably mounting needle-carrying syringes with the needles thereof disposed in a projecting position, said device being further provided with powered means for applying a turning driving force to the mounted syringe and needle, thereby to effect a rapid rotation of the same about the common axis thereof. By such unique arrangement, penetration of the needle into animal tissue or flesh can be accomplished with surprising effectiveness, involving not only a minimum amount of axial force but also the least possible discomfort and pain on the part of the patient or recipient. The improved holder-actuator device has a pair of widely spaced apart bearing portions separated by large sight openings which readily permit full visual inspection of the syringe barrel. Adjacent one of the bearing portions is a driving member in the form of a spur gear which has a relatively large bore into which the syringe can be inserted. Carried in the gear bore is a resilient O-ring adapted to slidably receive and frictionally grip-and drive the syringe body. The spur gear in turn is driven, through a gear train, from a small electric motor which is battery powered, said motor and battery being carried in a pistol-grip type casing within the handle portion thereof. The resilient O-ring not only enables the syringe body to be fully inserted therein so as to be supported by the spaced-apart bearing portions of the casing, but it also bears against the syringe body in such a manner as to apply a turning force thereto when the motor is energized. In consequence, the syringe with its needle is turned at a rapid pace, and ithas been found that the turning needle much more readily penetrates human or animal tissue or flesh, as' compared to nontuming needles, all with a minimum of axial force and a minimum amount of pain. The needle tip is preferably solid, having a sharp conical point with the discharge openings of the needle located in the side walls thereof directly behind the point.

Components of small size make it possible for the entire holder-applicator to occupy but little space, and

the unique bearing and. drive arrangement makes the applying of the needle to the holder device and the re moval of the needle therefrom especially easy and quick.

Still other features and advantages will hereinafter appear.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is an-axial sectional view of the improved hypodermic syringe holder-applicator as provided by the invention, with a syringe, needle and needle protector or cover shown carried in their operative positions.

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view ofa hypodermic needle of the preferred type as utilized with the syringe of FIG. I. The needle guard has been removed.

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary enlarged view of the tip portion of the hypodermic needle, shown partly in axial section to reveal the structural details thereof. In this figure the tip of the needle is seen to have initially pene trated a section of tissue or flesh. This figure reveals the absence of dimpling, or resistance to the needle due to its rapid rotation.

FIG. 4 is a transverse sectional view of the syringe holder-applicator, taken on the line 44 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is a transverse sectional view taken on the line 55 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 illustrates the application to animal tissue of a conventional-type nonrotating hypodermic needle with obliquely cut tip, showing the initial resistance which is offered by the tissue and the dimpling or indenting thereof.

Considering first FIG. I, the improved hypodermic syringe and needle holder-applicator illustrated therein comprises a casing generally designated by the numeral 10, said casing being also hereinafter referred to as a carrier device.

In accordance with the present invention the casing 10 has a main body portion 12 in which there is mounted an electric motor 14 having a worm l6'on its drive shaft. The worm 16 engages a worm wheel 18 carried by a transmission shaft 20 which latter is mounted in bearings 22 and 24 disposed respectively in rear and front walls 26 and 28 of the casing 10. A smallerdiameter rear portion 30 of the casing houses a single dry-cell battery 32, and it will be understood that the casing portion can be much smaller in girth than the main body portion 12 by virtue of the battery 32 having a diameter somewhat on the order of one-half the diameter of the electric motor 14.

The front wall 28 of the casing has an electric switch including a push-button 34-which is operable against a leaf spring contact 36. The spring 36 is connected by a lead wire 38 to the center terminal of the battery 32. One terminal of the motor 14 is connected by a lead wire 40 to the jacket of the battery 32. The other terminal of the motor 14 is joined by a wire 42 to a cooperable switch spring 44 which is engageable by the movable spring 36 of the electric switch. By such arrange-' ment, depressing of the button 34 will energize the ameter such that it can easily slidably receive and yet frictionally grip the barrel of a syringe 54. Such frictional grip and drive results from lateral force excited by the gear and O-ring against the syringe barrel as the latter is carried in bearing portions now to be described.

The casing 10 is seen to include a slender, integral syringe-supporting portion 56 provided with two widelyspaced apart bearing sleeves 58, 60 which are connected to each other by a plurality of ribs 62, 64 and 66.

In accordance with the invention the syringe, comprising the barrel 54 and a plunger 68 together with a needle assemblage 70, is slidable into the bearing portion 56 to be rotatably carried by the sheeve bearings 58, 60. The needle assemblage 70 comprises a rigid sleeve 72 which can be molded of plastic, and a slender tubular metal needle 74, the latter being normally enclosed in a tubular guard or cover piece 76. The needle assemblage 70 further includes a collar 78 which is preferably constituted of plastic substance having an especially slippery surface, such as Teflon, Nylon (registered trademarks) or the like. The collar 78 is adapted to rotatably fit in the bearing sleeve 58 of the bearing portion 56 of the casing, as seen in FIG. 1. When the syringe is inserted in the bearing portion as in this figure, the barrel 54 of the syringe will be turnably carried in the bearing sleeve 60. Also, the O-ring 52 can now frictionally grip the syringe barrel 54 so as to constitute a driving connection thereto, when lateral force is exerted by the ring against the barrel.

During the above assemblage it will be understood that the guard 76 can be inserted through the foremost sleeve bearing 58 without interference. After comple tion of the assemblage of the syringe to the holderapplicator, the guard 76 of the needle can be removed.

1 With the parts in the positions indicated in FIG. 1 and with the guard 76 removed it is now only necessary, in order to use the syringe, to grasp the housing 10 (namely the main body portion 12, 30 thereof) and apply pressure to the switch button 34. This will energize the motor 14 and cause a rapid turning movement of the syringe 54 and needle 74. Such turning movement greatly facilitates the inserting of the needle in has a unique and advantageous configuration comprising a slender, sharp conical tip portion 78 which is integral with a tubular body portion 80, the latter being provided with a plurality of discharge openings 82 in its side wall as seen in FIG. 3. The discharge openings 82 are preferably located immediately behind the conical tip 78. Such a needle construction is in sharp contrast to the conventional hypodermic needle like that designated 84 and shown in FIG. 6 wherein the point portion has an opening 88 that reveals the end of, the needle bore 90. When this conventional needle is applied to animal tissue as illustrated in FIG. 6 it will not immediately penetrate the same but instead will cause a dimple 92 to be formed due to the resistance'offered by, the skin. This is in sharp contrast to the piercing action which characterizes the improved needle of the present invention shown in FIG. 3, when such needle is rapidly rotated as by the holder-applicator of FIG. 1. Referring to FIG. 3, the tip portion 94 of the needle will immediately pierce the tissue with very little axial force being required, whereby there is a noticeable absence of dimpling of the tissue such as the dir'nple92 illustrated in FIG. 6.

Accordingly it will now be seen from the foregoing that l have provided a novel and improved hypodermic needle construction, an an improved vsyringeholderapplicator device whereby the syringe and needle are rapidly rotated, all to the end that a much quicker and easier insertion of the needle in animal tissue can be ef- I fected, without the dimpling or discomfort which characterizes the use of conventional hypodermic needles such as that shown in FIG. 6. The improved holder is seen to be especially simple, small, compact and lightweight in its construction, and is so arranged as to easily accommodate a usual type of syringeand hypodermic needle, by the mere process of pushing the syringe assemblage into the bearing portion 56 of the holder with a forward motion, until the bearing collar 78 is seated in the bearing sleeve 58. Thereupon the guard 76 can be removed so that the device is ready for use in the manner above explained. After energization of the motor and spinning of the syringe to effect insertion of the needle, the motor is halted by releasing pressure from the button 34, whereupon the plunger 68 can be manipulated to effect the injection. The barrel portion 54 of the syringe is clearly visible through the side openings between the ribs 62, 66 whereby the extent or amount of injection of the fluid can be easily'observed and controlled.

Variations and modifications are possible without departing from the spirit of the invention.

I claim: r 1. Means for facilitating the introduction of a hypodermic needle into animal tissue, comprising in combination:

a. a carrier. device, I b. a hollow hypodermic needle havinga sharp, imperforate pointed and conical tip portion and having a side opening spaced back of said conical tip portion andconstituting a discharge orifice, c. means for rotatably mounting said needle on said carrier device with the conical tip thereof disposed in a projecting position,

d. second mounting means on said carrier device, for applying a turning, driving force to said needle to effect a rapid turning thereof about its axis, thereby enabling a penetration of the needle into said animal tissue to be effected with a minimum of axial force and discomfort, and

e. a hypodermic syringe supported by said second mounting means and carrying said needle,

f. said carrier comprising a casing having bearing means receiving and turnably supporting the syringe and the needle carried thereby,

g. powering means connected to said second mounting means to activate the latter.

2. A device as set forth in claim 1, wherein:

a. the powering means comprises an electric motor and a battery supply for energizing the same, and

b. gearing connected with said motor, to transfer force therefrom to the needle.

3. A device as set forth in claim 2, wherein:

a. said gearing comprises a wormsecured to the motor shaft, and comprises a set of cooperable spur gears one of which is connected to the needle to turn the latter, and

b. a worm gear engaged with said worm and connected to drive the other of said spur gears.

4. A device as set forth in claim 2, wherein:

a. the battery supply comprises a single dry-cell battery disposed alongside and closely juxtaposed to the electric motor,

b. said battery and motor having their axes substantially parallel,

c. said battery having a diameter on the order of approximately one-half the diameter of the motor,

d. a casing enclosing said motor and battery,

e. a pushbutton switch carried by the casing at that side of the motor which is opposite from the side adjacent to the battery, f. said casing having a large-diameter body portion surrounding the motor and having a small-diameter body portion surroundingthe battery,

g. said small diameter portion of the casing being engageable with the users hand between the thumb and forefinger thereof when the casing is held in the manner of a pistol grip, with the middle finger arranged to actuate said electric switch.

5. A device as in claim I, wherein:

a. the second mounting means for applying a turning force to the needle comprises a spur gear having a relatively large bore adapted to receive the syringe body, and

b. an O-ring being carried in the bore of the spur gear.

6. Means for facilitating the introduction of a hypodermic needle into animal tissue, comprising in combination:

a. a carrier device,

b. a hollow hypodermic needle having a sharp, imperforate pointed and conical tip portion and'having a side opening spaced back of said conical tip portion and constituting a discharge orifice,

0. means for rotatably mounting said needle on said carrier device with the conical tip thereof disposed in a projecting position, and

d. powering means on said carrier device for applying a turning, driving force to said mounting means to effect a rapid turning of the needle about its axis, thereby enabling a penetration of the needle into said animal tissue to be effected with a minimum of axial force and discomfort,

e. said mounting means comprising a syringe mounting the needle and an O-ring turnable in the carrier about an axis in alignment with the axis of the syringe,

f. said O-ring slidably receiving and frictionally gripping the barrel of the syringe to impart turning force thereto.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification604/188, 606/185, 128/DIG.100, 606/180
International ClassificationA61M5/20, A61M5/32
Cooperative ClassificationA61M2005/3289, Y10S128/01, A61M5/3291, A61M5/20
European ClassificationA61M5/20