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Publication numberUS3811671 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 21, 1974
Filing dateAug 25, 1972
Priority dateAug 25, 1972
Publication numberUS 3811671 A, US 3811671A, US-A-3811671, US3811671 A, US3811671A
InventorsTurnbull C
Original AssigneeChesebrough Ponds
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container for forced expiration exercises
US 3811671 A
Abstract
A unitary, self-supporting, semi-rigid container for forced expiration exercises having a pair of compartments for containing liquid into which a patient seeking respiratory stimulation can forceably blow, a web between and integrally joined to the compartments providing rigidity for the container, and a conduit in the web for transferring the liquid from one compartment to the other in response to a patient forceably blowing into the liquid filled compartment.
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United States Patent 1191 Turnbull [111 3,811,671 [451 May21, 1974 CONTAINER FOR FORCED EXPIRATION EXERCISES [75] Inventor: Charles II. Turnbull, Old Lyme,

Conn.

[73] Assignee: Cheseborough-Ponds Inc., New

York, NY.

[22] Filed: Aug. 25, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 283,874

[52] US. Cl. 272/57 F, 128/208, 220/232, 220/238, 272/DIG. 5

[51] Int. Cl. A63b 23/00, A61b 5/08 [58] Field of Search 272/57 F, DIG. 5; 128/208; 46/1 D; 275/11 R; 220/205, 23.2,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1/1968 Bidwell et a1. 128/276 7/1941 Menard ...'220/20.5 X 5/1972 Noll 215/11 R 10/1963 Friedman 46/1 D 714,141 11/1902 Cady 128/208 X 2,445,275 7/1948 Lintern et a1. 220/232 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 859,316 12/1940 France ..272/57F Primary Examiner-Anton O. Oechsle Assistant Examiner-R. T. Stouffer 5 7] ABSTRACT A unitary, self-supporting, semi-rigid container for forced expiration exercises having a pair of compartments for containing liquid into which a patient seeking respiratory stimulation can forceably blow, a web between and integrally joined to the compartments providing rigidity for the container, and a conduit in the web for transferring the liquid from one compartment to the other in response to a patient forceably blowing into the liquid filled compartment.

The conduit includes a pair of spaced channels each connected at its lower end to the adjacent compartment and at its upper end to an interconnecting restriction for controlling the quantity of liquid flowing through the downstream channel to prevent siphoning from occurring when a recuperating patient blows into the liquid filled compartment and causes liquid in that compartment to flow through the conduit into the other compartment.

12 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures (II-1x6 CEN7METER$ CONTAINER FOR FORCED EXPIRATION EXERCISES FIELD OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a respiratory stimulator, and more particularly to a unitary device having compartments between which liquid is transferred by forceably blowing thereinto.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION tion exercises includes a pair of separate blow bottles with multiple segments of independent interconnecting tubing. In practice, the patient blows liquid from one bottle into the other bottle through flexible interconnecting tubing. Because the bottles are separate considerable relative movement or racking has been experienced in handling and use. In an attempt to avoid racking, an elastic strap has been used which is slipped about both bottles. While the strap has been found to limit racking it does not eliminate, altogether, undesirable relative movement.

Furthermore, the bottles are not joined permanently because they each must be screwed into caps. In one version tubing through which the patient blew and a rigid tube adapted to extend into the bottom of one of the bottles had been attached to one of the caps. From the rigid tube then extended flexible tubing which was connected to the other cap which, in turn, was secured to the other bottle. In operation, the patient blew through the tubing attached to the liquid filled bottle which caused liquid to flow upwardly through the rigid tube and on through the interconnecting tube into the other bottle. After the liquid had been transferred to the other bottle, the caps with the tubes were removed and bottles reversed,so that theexercise could be repeated in reverse order.

To eliminate the necessity of interchanging the caps and tubing, another version had attached to each cap in a preassembled manner a blow-through tube and a depending rigid tube from which extended flexible tubing attached to the other cap. With this version however, it was found that when a patient blew into one of the bottles, the liquid flowing into and the air escaping from the other bottle often created a siphoning effect in which the liquid would continue to flow until the level of liquid in each bottle was the same. Thus, by effecting a siphon the patient obviated the purpose of the exercise. To overcome this drawback, one way flutter valves had been attached to the liquid transferring interconnecting tubes which allowed the flow of liquid into a bottle only in response to continued forced breathing. But in so doing, still additional parts had been thereby made necessary.

Accordingly, while the liquid in the blow bottles provided the resistance necessary to produce prolonged expiration and measurement of the patients effort, as well as to bring relatively unused muscles into play, the

multiplicity of independent and relatively movable parts makes the combination cumbersome and awkward to handle and use for both the patient and the nurse or therapist.

It is, therefore, an object of this invention to provide a new and improved respiratory stimulator for forced expiration exercises without the attendant disadvantages of the presently employed blow bottles.

Among the other objects of this invention are to provide a unitary container which employes liquid for inducing respiratory stimulation and which can be easily handled and used by both the patient or nurse or therapist; to provide such a unitary container without the need for valves or other independent parts to prevent a recuperating patient from creating a siphoning effect, to provide such a unitary container to effectively eliminate the need for expensive equipment for forced breathing exercises; and to provide such container which saves time in setting up and in instructing a patient on how to effectively use the device.

Additional objects and advantages will be set forth in part hereinafter and in part will be obvious herefrom or may be learned with the practice of the invention, the same being realized and obtained by means of the respiratory stimulator recited in the appended claims.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with the invention, there is provided a respiratory stimulator for forced expiration exercises, comprising a unitary, self-supporting container formed of plastic, preferably of a semi-rigid or rigid, translucent or transparent, one-piece construction. The container has a pair of compartments through which liquid contained therein can be seen. These compartments are spaced apart by an integral strengthening web having a conduit therein for transferring liquid from one compartment to the other in response to a patient forceably blowing into the liquid filled compartment.

The conduit in the web includes a pair of spaced channels, each of which is opened at its lower end to the lower end of one of the compartments, and an interconnecting restriction positioned in the web at the level of the upper portions of the compartments. The interconnecting restriction in the conduit is in the form of an orifice having a breadth less than the breadth of the channels to prevent siphoning while allowing the flow of liquid through the conduit when a recuperating patient forceably blows into one of the compartments. For in the present invention, the interconnecting orifice controls the quantity of liquid which flows through the downstream channel so that liquid flowing therethrough does not remove the air from that channel and thereby effect siphoning.

Preferably the compartments and channels are substantially vertical and the interconnecting orifice is formed by a substantially horizontal channel having a diameter less than the diameter of the channels which prevents a siphoning effect from occurring when a recuperating patient blows into the liquid filled compartment and liquid flows through the channels into the other of said compartments.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS those skilled in the art within the spirit and scope of the invention.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a unitary respiratory stimulator constructed in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a longitudinal view, in section, of the respiratory stimulator illustrated in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view, taken along the lines 33 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view, taken along the lines 4-4 of FIG. 2. I

Referring first to FIGS. 1 and 2 there is shown a unitary self-supporting, semi-rigid container formed from a see through plastic in a one piece construction. The container 10 includes a pair of compartments 12 and 14 forming vertical chambers 16 and 18 for containing liquid, and an intermediate web 20 having an interconnecting conduit 22 extending therethrough.

The compartment 12 has a base 24 from which extends a cylindrical wall structure 26 with an inwardly and upwardly sloping top portion 28 from which, in turn, extends a threaded neck 30 for receiving a complimentary threaded closure, such as screw cap 32. Extending upwardly from the screw cap 32 is a nipple 34 over which is slidably fitted flexible tube 36 which terminates at its other end in a mouthpiece 38.

Correspondingly, the compartment 18 has a base 40, a cylindrical wall structure 42 and an inwardly and upwardly sloping top portion 44 from which extends a nipple 46 over which a flexible tube 48 is slidably fitted which terminates at its other end at' a mouthpiece 50.

To help the physician in prescribing the desired level of exercise and to measure the patients progress, the compartments 12 and 14 are incrementally graduated. As illustrated, the measured capacity of each compartment is 900 cc (about 1 quart) graduated in 50 cc increments.

The interconnecting web 20 is integrally joined to the central portions of the compartment wall structures 26 and 42 and is of a flat solid construction so as to act as strengthening member which provides rigidity to the container 10. In the described embodiment of the invention the web 20 is about 8.0 inches high, 2.0 inches wide between compartments 12 and 14 and 0.125 inches thick.

At its lower end the web 20 terminates in a straight base 52 at the compartment bases 24 and 40. At its upper end the web 20 is in the form of a truncated shaped crest 54 positioned at the level of the nipples 34 and 46 with a horizontal upper edge 56 and depending sides 58 and 60 which extend downwardly at oblique angles and are integrally joined to the compartment top portion 28 and 44. To facilitate hanging or suspending of container 10, holes 61 are molded into or drilled through the web crest 54 on opposite sides of conduit 22.

The conduit 22 in the web 20 includes a pair of vertical channels 62 and 64 having elbow shaped segments 66 and 68 at their lower ends which open into the lower portion of the chambers 16 and 18. At their upper ends, the channels 62 and 64 extend into the top of the web 20 where they are interconnected by a channel 70 horizontally positioned within the upper segment of the crest 54. The diameter of the horizontal channel 70 is less than the diameter of the vertical channels 62 and 64 to prevent siphoning of the flowing liquid when a recuperating patient blows into one of the chambers 16 and 18, but is of sufflciently large diameter to provide an interconnecting orifice which allows the transfer of liquid from one vertical channel to the other during forced expiration exercises. In the illustrated embodiment of the invention the inner diameter of each vertical channel 62 and 64 is 0.6875 inches and the inner diameter of the horizontal channel is 0.1875 inches.

In using the container 10 of the invention for forced expiration exercises, the vertical chamber 16 is filled with water which can be colored by dropping a tablet thereinto. The cap 32 is then screwed flrrnly onto the chamber neck 30.

The patient can blow into the chamber 16 either via the nipple 34 or the mouthpiece 38 and the flexible tube 36 attached to the nipple 34. For example, where the patient is prone in bed, the flexible tube 36 should be used. Correspondingly the flexible tube 48 and mouthpiece 50 can be used for blowing into the chamber 18 by simple sliding the tube 48 over the nipple 46. In the illustrated embodiment flexible tubes of about 15.0 inches in length have been found to be satisfactory.

With the chamber 16 filled with colored water and the flexible tubes 36 and 48, if desired, in place, the patient blows into mouthpiece 38 which causes water in the chamber 16 to flow upwardly through the upstream channel 62 across orifice 70 and down through the downstream channel 64 into the chamber 18.

Once the patient completes the forced expiration exercise which transfers water from chamber 16 to chamber 18 the described procedure is reversed. This procedure of blowing the water from one chamber to the other is then repeated as often as desired.

In the preferred embodiment of the invention the orifice 70 is of a sufficient diameter to allow that water to flow as described in response to the blowing action of the patient while being sufficiently constricted relative to the breadth of the channels 62 and 64 to prevent water in the descending downstream channel from sweeping the air therein along with it. In so doing the container 10 is constructed to prevent a recuperating patient from effecting siphoning which would occur if the air in the downstream channel was swept out into the chamber 18 by the downwardly cascading water.

However, where desired the relationship in the sizes or breadths of the channels 62 and 64 and orifice 70 can be constructed so that a recuperating patient would not be unable to effect siphoning whereas a fully recovered patient could efiect siphoning after expending a substantial effort. In this embodiment the siphoning provides an indication that patients respiratory system no longer needs forced stimulation.

The unitary container 10 of the invention is formed from plastic materials, preferably therrnoplastics which are inert and stable in the formed container and which lend themselves to processing by plastic forming techniques, and will, when fonned, provide the see through, self-supporting, semi-rigid or rigid container described and claimed herein. In the preferred embodiment the container is formed by blow molding high density polyethylene through which the colored water in the compartments and conduit can be seen. Other thermoplastic materials which in the formed container are translucent or transparent also can be used, including low density polyethylene, polycarbonate and polypropylene. Further, in blow molding incremental graduations in the compartments 12 and 14 are formed as raised ridges along with the capacity of each chamber 16 and 18 being indicated at each graduation by raised numerals. When the container of the invention is formed in parts by molding or other techniques, the parts are preferably permanently joined by seams at their mating segments to provide a one-piece, semi-rigid or rigid container.

The invention in its broader aspect is not limited to the specific described embodiments and departures may be made therefrom within the scope of the accompanying claims without departing from the principals of the invention and without sacrificing its chief advantages.

What is claimed is:

1. A unitary self-supporting container for forced expiration exercises comprising: a pair of compartments for containing liquid into which a patient can forceably blow to achieve respiratory stimulation, a web between and integrally joined to said compartments, and a conduit in said web which includes a pair of substantially vertical spaced channels each of which is connected-to the lower portion of said adjacent compartment and each of which extends upwardly therefrom in said web to the level of the upper portions of said compartments and a restriction in said web at the level of the upper portions of said compartments interconnected with and having a breadth less than the breadth of said channels for the transfer of the liquid from one compartment to the other when a patient forceably blows into the compartment containing the liquid.

2. A unitary self-supporting container for forced expiration exercise comprising: a pair of compartments for containing liquid into which a patient can forceably blow to achieve respiratory stimulation, a web between and integrally joined to compartments, and a conduit in said web for transferring the liquid from one compartment to the other in which said conduit includes a pair of vertical spaced channels each of which is connected to the lower portion of said adjacent compartment and each of which extends upwardly therefrom in said web to the level of the upper portions of said compartments and an orifice in said web at the level of the upper portions of said compartments interconnected with and having a breadth less than the breadth of said channels for controlling the quantity of liquid which can flow through said channel downstream of said orifree so that the liquid flowing therethrough will not remove the air therein and effect siphoning when a recuperating patient blows into the liquid containing compartment to cause the liquid in said compartment to flow through said conduit and into the other of said compartments.

3. The unitary container according to claim 2 wherein said container is semi-rigid and of a one piece construction.

4. The unitary container according to claim 3 wherein said container is at least translucent and is formed from thermoplastic materials selected from the group consisting of high or low density polyethylene, polycarbonate and polypropylene.

5. A unitary self-supporting, semi-rigid container for forced expiration exercises comprising: a pair of compartments for containing liquid, wherein one of said compartments has a removable cap for filling said compartment with liquid and to which is attached means for allowing a patient to blow into said compartment, and wherein the other of said compartments has means attached thereto for allowing a patient to blow into said compartment, has means attached thereto for allowing a patient to blow into said compartment; a strengthening web to provide rigidity to said container between and integrally joined to said compartments; and a conduit in said web for transferring the liquid from one compartment to the other in which said conduit includes a pair of substantially vertical spaced channels each of which is connected to the lower portion of said adjacent compartment and each of which extends upwardly therefrom into the upper portion of said web and an orifice located in the upper portion of said web interconnecting said channels and having a breadth less than the breadth of said channels for allowing the flow of liquid between said channels while preventing a siphoning effect from occurring when a recuperating patient blows into the liquid containing compartment to cause the liquid therein to flow through said channels and into the other of said compartments.

6. The conduit according to claim 5 wherein said interconnecting orifice is formed by a substantially horizontal channel in said conduit having a diameter less than the diameter of said vertical channels.

7. The container according to claim 5 wherein said compartments are substantially vertical and the web is l integrally joined thereto along the height of such compartments.

8. The container according to claim 7 wherein said web has a pair of holes therethrough on opposite sides of the conduit in said web for suspension of said container.

9. The container according to claim 5 wherein said compartments have incremental graduations in the form of integral raised edges along with the capacity of said compartments being indicated by raised numerals .at each graduation.

10. The container according to claim 5 wherein said means for blowing into the compartments includes a hollow nipple.

ill. The unitary container according to claim 5 wherein said means for blowing into each compartment includes a nipple, a flexible tube fitted over said nipple, and a mouthpiece attached to the other end of said flexible tube.

12. A unitary self-supporting, semi-rigid container for forced expiration exercises comprising: a pair of vertical compartments for containing liquid into which a patient seeking respiratory stimulation can blow; a strengthening web to provide rigidity to said container between and integrally joined to said compartments along the height of each; and a conduit in said web for transferring liquid between said compartments in which said conduit has a pair of vertical channels each of which is connected at its lower end to the lower portion of the adjacent compartment and extends upwardly therefrom into the upper portion of said web, and a horizontal channel in the upper portion of said web interconnecting said vertical channels and having a diameter less than the diameters of said vertical channels so that when a recuperating patient blows into the liquid filled compartment liquid therefrom flows upwardly through said adjacent vertical channel across said horizontal channel and downwardly through said other vertical channel into its adjacent compartment without effecting siphoning.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3936048 *Jan 8, 1975Feb 3, 1976Owens-Illinois, Inc.Lung exercise device
US3977395 *Feb 20, 1975Aug 31, 1976Peter Nelson BrawnCombination inhalation and exhalation respiratory therapy device
US3977399 *Apr 15, 1975Aug 31, 1976Peter Nelson BrawnPositive pressure and volume measure respiratory device
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US5692626 *Jul 29, 1996Dec 2, 1997Basf CorporationIntegral dual compartment container
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US8381723Oct 6, 2010Feb 26, 2013Seattle Children's HospitalBroad-band, low frequency, high-amplitude, long time duration, oscillating airway pressure breathing apparatus and method utilizing bubbles
US8499759Oct 6, 2010Aug 6, 2013Seattle Children's HospitalBroad-band, low frequency, high-amplitude, long time duration, oscillating airway pressure breathing apparatus and method utilizing bubbles
US9345850Aug 25, 2014May 24, 2016Eupnea Technologies, Inc.Apparatus and method to provide breathing support
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CN102046232BApr 8, 2009Jul 2, 2014西雅图儿童医院d/b/a西雅图儿童研究所Broad-band, low frequency, high-amplitude, long time duration, oscillating airway pressure breathing apparatus and method utilizing bubbles
CN103357094B *Apr 8, 2009Oct 28, 2015西雅图儿童医院d/b/a西雅图儿童研究所利用气泡的宽带、低频、高幅、长持续时间、振荡气道压力呼吸设备
CN103463800A *Sep 26, 2013Dec 25, 2013中国人民解放军第二军医大学Pulmonary function exerciser
CN103463800B *Sep 26, 2013Jan 20, 2016中国人民解放军第二军医大学肺功能锻炼器
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WO2014026227A1 *Aug 13, 2013Feb 20, 2014Physiotherapydynamics Pty. Ltd.Oscillatory positive expiratory pressure apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification482/13, 220/23.8, 220/23.2
International ClassificationA63B23/18, A63B23/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B23/18
European ClassificationA63B23/18
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 12, 1987AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: CHESEBROUGH-POND S INC., (A NY CORP.)
Effective date: 19861031
Owner name: SHERWOOD MEDICAL CO., 1831 OLIVE STREET, ST. LOUIS
Mar 12, 1987AS03Merger
Owner name: CHESEBROUGH-POND S INC., A CORP. OF NEW YORK
Effective date: 19861024
Owner name: SYRINGE INDUSTRIES, INC., (MERGED INTO)
Mar 12, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: CHESEBROUGH-POND S INC., A CORP. OF NEW YORK
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:SYRINGE INDUSTRIES, INC., (MERGED INTO);REEL/FRAME:004690/0080
Effective date: 19861024
Owner name: SHERWOOD MEDICAL CO., 1831 OLIVE STREET, ST. LOUIS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:CHESEBROUGH-POND S INC., (A NY CORP.);REEL/FRAME:004690/0075
Effective date: 19861031