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Publication numberUS3813121 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 28, 1974
Filing dateOct 12, 1972
Priority dateOct 12, 1972
Publication numberUS 3813121 A, US 3813121A, US-A-3813121, US3813121 A, US3813121A
InventorsMarvin S
Original AssigneeMarvin S
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Article collecting device
US 3813121 A
Abstract
Disclosed is a scissor-like waste disposal device having handles at one end and blades at the other end. The blades have upstanding side walls which form a receptacle for waste upon assuming a closed position. One blade has a finger extending across the engaging blades to prevent waste between the blades from moving out of engagement. A plastic bag is provided secured to the pivot of the scissor and arranged to act as a shield in a first position and, in a second position, to be pulled over and secure therewithin the waste and the blades. To this end a twist wire is affixed within the marginal end of the bag at its opening.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

. nited States Patent [19] Marvin May 28, 1974 v [22] Filed:

[ ARTICLE COLLECTING DEVICE 211 Appl. No.: 296,911

[52] US. Cl. 294/1 R, 294/16, 294/118 Lemler 294/19 R X Primary Examiner-Evon C. Blunk Assistant Examiner-Johnny D. Cherry Attorney, Agent, or FirmPhilip Furgang 5 7 ABSTRACT Disclosed is a scissor-like waste disposal device having handles at one end and blades at the other end. The blades have upstanding side walls which form a receptacle for waste upon assuming a closed position. One blade has a finger extending across the engaging blades to prevent waste between the blades from moving out of engagement. A plastic bag is provided secured to the pivot 0f the scissor and arranged to act as a shield in a first position and, in a second position, to be pulled over and secure therewithin the waste and the blades. To this end a twist wire is affixed within the marginal end of the bag at its opening.

10 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures ARTICLE COLLECTING DEVICE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to devices for picking up articles and more particularly to devices intended to engage and collect such articles as, for example, refuse of various types.

. More and more refuse and trash are becomingthe pressing problem of society. In particular, it is noted that there are an increasing number of government laws, ordinances, and regulations directed to individuals to properly-dispose of trash. In this connection, government agencies are requiring individuals to dispose of refuse caused by their industry andpersonal activities, including excrement left by pets.

Various suggestions have been made to provide implements capable of picking up trash, refuse, the excrement of animals, and the like. One such device is proposed by Fisher in U.S. Pat. No. 3,281,178. This device provides a frame as an integral part of an elongated handle. The frame supports a plastic bag which may be removed when desired, for disposal.

Another suggested device is a pair of pivotally mounted tongs carrying thereon a tissue container. This device, proposed by Gruber in US. Pat. No. 3,560,039, is intended to dispose of animal excrement by means of first engaging the excrement in the tongs and then removing it from the tongs by means of the tissues secured at the pivot. a

Still another device is proposed by Johnston in US. Pat. No. 3,328,066. Johnston proposes an elongated handle With tongs, not unlike those of Gruber. The tongs are integral with lever arms which are, in turn, pivotally secured toone another. The jaws of the tongs,

suggested by Johnston, are provided with lateral coplanar plates which, upon closing, form a pocket to hold trash therewithin.

All of these devices have a number of disadvantages. They have in common a bulkiness which makes them cumbersome to carry about and use. In addition, the construction of these devices is so intricate as to make it uneconomical to dispose of immediately after a single use. Bulkiness aside, there is the problem of carrying an instrument which is filthy from the trash or excrement it has collected, back to ones home or place of business.

Even where it is not inconvenient to carry a waste removing device, all of these devices provide certain dis; advantages in the manner in which the refuse is picked up. In devices of the type proposed by Fisher, for example, refuse and particularly moist and semi-fluid excrement is pushed ahead of the open-mouthed receptacle. Unless another implement is used, at least a substantial part of the waste is likely to remain unremoved. The

devices of the type proposed by Gruber and Johnston are similarly inefficient. Waste, and in particular animal excrement, rarely conforms to such a shape as to permit closing jaws to conveniently and cleanly grasp and retain such matter. More than that, there is believed to be required a considerable amount of dexterity and manipulationto retrieve waste. Furthermore, the narrow engaging'surfaces of the jaws and the sharply curving'walls thereof, will cause, it is believed, the refuset'o be pushed outwardly as the jaws close. This is particularly true where such waste is powdery or dust-like.

In general, closing jaws or tongs are inefficient in holding portions of most particles. Thus, there is not provided in the aforementioned devices a sanitary method of waste removal. Gruber suggests the use of tissues. However, Gruber suggests the use of tissues provided in a container. In such a setting, the device must first gather the waste and then a separate tissue must be removed and placed about the waste. This is believed to be highly cumbersome and inconvenient. First, the waste must be removed and grasped by the tissue. Contact with waste cannot be avoided. Second, in such movement, the dropping of waste cannot be avoided. Furthermore, none of the devices discussed herein provide any means for shielding the hands of the user, particularly where the device requires that the hands be placed near the waste.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is an object of this invention to provide a waste collecting device which is economical to manufacture, and convenient to use.

It is an object of this invention to provide a waste collecting-device which may be, if desired, disposable.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a sanitary method of removing such waste as, for example, animal excrement.

It is still another object of this invention to provide means for protecting the hands of the user from the waste and means for enclosing and disposing of the waste. 7

In fulfillment of these objectives there is provided a device for removing waste or refuse. Generally, this device is a pair of pivotally mounted lever arms. Means are provided, at one end of the lever arms, to collect the waste or refuse. A bag 'or receptacle is provided secured at its closed end and proximate the pivot point of the lever arms. The bag is so arranged that it may be disposed about and enclose therewithin the collecting means.

In another aspect of this invention, there is provided a scissor like device having handle and blade portions.

The blade portions have substantially lateral walls. Upon closing the blades upon, for example, waste, the blades overlap and the lateral walls form, in combination with said blades, a receptacle.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Disclosed is a device 10 for picking up articles such as, for example, waste and the like. One such use may be, as has been previously indicated herein, to remove animal excrement.

The device 10 comprises two scissor arms 12 and 14 which includes handle portions 16 and blade portions 18 and 20. The two scissor arms 12 and 14 may be pivotally secured to one another by any well-known means, such as a pin 22 located between the handle portions 16 and the blades 18 and 20. The blades 18 and 20 may be substantially planar members with the perimeters thereof defining rectangles. The rectangular blades 18 and 20 may be arranged with the large dimensions fonning the engaging edges 24 and 26 thereof.

One of the blades 18 may have a finger 28 extending laterally with respect to the rectangular shape thereof and across the engaging edges 24 and 26 of both blades 18 and 20. The finger 28 may have a surface coplanar with the surface of the remainder of the blade 18 and form a rectangular extension thereof with at least one edge coincident with one edge of the blade 18.

The blades 18 and 20 overlap at their respective engaging edges 24 and 26. The opposed edges of each blade 18 and 20 may have substantially laterally upstanding side walls 30 and 32. The front of each blade 18 and 20, opposite the handle portions 16, may also have substantially laterally upstanding side walls 34 and 36. The engaging edges 24 and 26 of the blades 18 and 20 may be beveled with the apices 38 thereof being located adjacent the bottom surfaces of the blades 18 and 20. The application of the apices 38 will be more fully discussed hereinbelow.

Secured to the scissor arms 12 and 14 by the pin 22 may be a bag 40. The bag 40 may be secured at a closed end 42 which is opposite an open end 44 thereof. The marginal edge 44 defining the opening of the bag 40 may have a flexible semi-rigid member 46 therein. The member 46 may be made of any well-known material, such as a wire of metal or plastic.

The scissor arms 12 and 14 may be made of any commonly known material suitable for the purpose set forth herein. Thus, such materials as a semi-rigid or rigid plastic may be useful. Preferrably, the scissor arms 12 and 14 may be made of a thin and flexible plastic of approximately one eighth of an inch in thickness. The side walls 30, 32, 34, and 36 may extend upwardly, with respect to the blades 18 and 20, to a height of approximately 1 or 2 inches. .T he rectangularly shaped blades 18 and 20 may be, for example, approximately 3 by 6 inches. The swivel pin 22 may be made of metal or plastic, such as for example, a simple copper cotter pin. The bag 40 may be made of any well-known material, such as a transparent polyethelyne.

ln assembly, the two scissor arms 12 and 14 may be arranged for securing one to the other. The closed end 42 of the bag 40 may be open at this time and placed with the opposed sides of the bag 48 and 50 on opposed arms 12 and 14. The bag 40 may be arranged with the body thereof drawn over the blades 18 and 20. The pin 22 may then be inserted through the bag 40 and arms 12 and 14 (FIG. 2) and the end 42 of the bag 40 sealed shut thereabout by well-known means, such as heat or the like. Thereafter, the bag 40 may be drawn across and enclosingtherewithin the handle portions 16.

The blades 18 and 20 are so dimensioned as to form two scraping arms. When closed, the walls 30, 32, 34, and 36 together with the blades 18 and 20 form a threesided receptacle (FIG. 3). The blades 18 and 20 may be arranged so that either one is below the other and the front walls 34 and 36 close tightly upon one another (FIG. 3 Preferrably, the blade is with the finger 2s, 6

may be placed beneath the other blade 20 and the front wall 30 thereof disposed in front of the blade 20.

The plastic construction suggested herein provides for an easily disposable waste collecting device. In use, a hand 52 may be inserted into the bag 40 and engage the handle portions 16. The bag 40 acts as a shield to protect the hand 52 from any waste to be collected. Waste 54, such as the excrement of an animal, may be gathered in the device 10 by placing the blades 18 and 20 flat on the ground 56. As the blades 18 and 20 are closed, the excrement 54 may be expected to be moved toward the front end of the arms 12 and 14. This movement is the natural result of the action of the engaging edges 24 and 26 of the blades 18 and 20. The overlapping of the blades 18 and 20 will, to some degree, retain the waste 54 thereon. The finger 28, however, blocks the movement of the excrement 54 from proceeding outside the confines of the device 10. The apices 38 of the beveled edges 24 and 26 aid in the scraping action against the ground 56 necessary to remove a moist waste 54.

Upon completion of this activity, the bag 40 may be drawn or disposed about the blades 18 and 20 and the wire 46 twisted shut, sealing the excrement 54 therewithin. The entire assembly may then be conveniently disposed of in any garbage can, sewer, or the like.

The benefits of a device 10 of this type are immediately apparent. For example, a person walking a dog can conveniently carry this light device 10, remove the dogs excrement and dispose of it with the device 10 and not have to carry any part back to his residence.

Another example of the usefulness of this device 10 is in the picking up of loose and small particles of waste. The scissor action tends to gather these particularly hard to remove particles.

The shape of the blades 18 and 20 need not, of course, be rectangular. Any desired shape, including semi-circular or elipsoid, may be used. The upstanding walls may thus conform to the shape of the marginal edges. The walls, however, need not be placed at the marginal edges and may assume any desire configuration. If desired, a fourth wall may be provided on the disclosed device 10 across at least a portion of the blades adjacent the pivot pin 22.

lt is also clear that the bag 40 may be secured to any scissor or lever type device and so dimensioned that it may be disposed over the jaws or blades thereof.

What is claimed is:

1. An article collecting device of the type intended to hold refuse comprising: a scissor comprising at least two arms, each comprising handle and blade portions, pivotally secured to one another for relative movement therebetween, said blades including overlapping blade engaging portions and walls, such that upon closing said blades upon an article the article is pushed by one of said blades onto the other of said blades, said blades being in a closed condition in combination with said walls forming a receptacle, one of said blades comprises a finger extending from said one blade across said blade engaging portions such that said finger assists in entrapping said article enclosed within said device and between said blades.

2. An article collecting device as recited in claim 1 wherein said finger comprises substantially laterally upstanding wall integral with the said wall of said one blade such that upon said blades being in a closed position said walls and said blades form said receptacle.

3. An article collecting device as recited in claim 2 wherein said one blade rests beneath said other blade and said finger wall is exterior of said wall of said other blade. 4. An article collecting device as recited in claim 3 wherein said blade portions are substantially rectangular in shape with said handle portions thereof each integral with said blade. 5. An article collecting device as recited in claim 4 further comprises a pin, said arms pivotally secured to one another by said pin, said walls extending along said perimeter of said blades, said blade engaging portions comprising blade engaging edges, said edges being beveled, said blades having an upper, article holding surface and a lower, supporting surface, said apex of each of said bevels terminating at said lower surface so that said blades are adapted to scrape a surface upon which the article to be collected rests. 6. A device as recited in claim 5 further comprising a flexible bag having at least one open end and secured to said arms by said pivot pin and so arranged in a first predetermined position to surround said handles to act as a shield and in a second predetermined position to enclose said blades, said bag having wire means within themarginal edge surrounding said open end so as to enable said bag to be closed about said blades.

7. An article collecting device of the type intended to hold refuse comprising:

a pair of lever arms pivotally secured to one another for relative movement therebetween, said arms comprising handle portions disposed to one side of said pivot and blade portions disposed on the other side of said pivot, said blade comprising edge engaging portions and substantially laterally upwardly extending walls disposed about the perimeter thereof, one of said blades comprising a finger extending therefrom and across said edge engaging portions so as to entrap therewithin articles intended to be collected 8. An article collecting device as recited in claim 7 wherein said blades in a closed position, in combination with said walls, form a receptacle for holding therein the collected article.

9. A device as recited in claim 7 further comprising bag means having at least one open end and secured proximate said pivotal securing of said lever arms such that said bag means may be disposed about and enclose therewithin said blades.

10. A device as recited in claim 9 wherein said bag being secured by the end thereof opposed to said open end and comprising means for closing said bag.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3328066 *Jan 6, 1965Jun 27, 1967Johnston OrinPickup device for trash
US3560039 *Dec 6, 1968Feb 2, 1971Jack GruberSanitation device
US3685088 *Mar 3, 1971Aug 22, 1972Doherty HenryMeans for collecting a dog's excrement by the dog's owner or walker
US3703158 *Sep 16, 1971Nov 21, 1972Lemler Seymour AScoop for animal waste
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4132442 *Mar 25, 1977Jan 2, 1979Larsson K O A HApparatus for picking-up and removing objects
US4138153 *Sep 12, 1977Feb 6, 1979Brown Jeffrey LSanitary self-contained fecal waste container
US4215886 *Aug 21, 1978Aug 5, 1980Iraj NaderiAnimal litter collector
US4788733 *Mar 14, 1988Dec 6, 1988Lerner Ross ECombined cleaning glove and disposal bag
US4836594 *Mar 15, 1988Jun 6, 1989Franz SpreiterApparatus for hygienically collecting feces and method of manufacturing same
US4845781 *Jan 27, 1988Jul 11, 1989Vadax, Inc.Disposable hand covering for handling contaminated material
US4937881 *Jan 3, 1984Jul 3, 1990Kimberly-Clark CorporationGarment device for handling and storing noxiuos materials
US5020159 *May 17, 1989Jun 4, 1991Delyle, Inc.Protective article for handling and containing waste materials
US5064233 *Apr 4, 1990Nov 12, 1991Sloan Donald GDisposable collection device for animal litter
US5186506 *Mar 30, 1992Feb 16, 1993Gale Edward LDevice for picking-up and removing animal excrement
US5280978 *Dec 3, 1992Jan 25, 1994Jamie BohnContainer device for the collection of waste
US5564763 *Nov 2, 1995Oct 15, 1996Mercurio; Cindy P.Device for picking up and removing dog droppings
US5584519 *May 30, 1995Dec 17, 1996Myles; J. ScottDisposable collection device for animal litter
US5836629 *Sep 18, 1997Nov 17, 1998Hobart; Stephen JohnDisposable animal waste receptacle
US5876079 *Mar 27, 1997Mar 2, 1999Pugon Ltd.Waste removal device
US7216905 *Apr 14, 2006May 15, 2007Armes Jr AndrewRefuse removal system and method for removing refuse
US7374215 *Jan 20, 2005May 20, 2008Scoopeeze Brands, Llc“Scoopeeze” portable canine waste pick-up device
US7506615Feb 3, 2005Mar 24, 2009Mar Mar Ps Development Co., LlcAnimal waste collection and disposal system
US7695034Mar 27, 2007Apr 13, 2010Scoopeeze Brands, LlcWaste collection apparatus
US7722099 *May 14, 2008May 25, 2010Vincent David BlandSanitary product disposal
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EP0037355A2 *Mar 24, 1981Oct 7, 1981Paul PoutchitsPick-up and disposal device for rubbish, particularly for animal faeces
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Classifications
U.S. Classification294/1.3, 206/525, 294/118, 294/16
International ClassificationE01H1/12, E01H1/00
Cooperative ClassificationE01H2001/126, E01H1/1206
European ClassificationE01H1/12B