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Publication numberUS3813191 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 28, 1974
Filing dateApr 12, 1973
Priority dateMay 1, 1972
Publication numberUS 3813191 A, US 3813191A, US-A-3813191, US3813191 A, US3813191A
InventorsFoster B
Original AssigneeFoster B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotary vane device for compressor, motor or engine
US 3813191 A
Abstract
An integral vane compressor and vane motor. At least three vanes are pinned to a central hub and extend through respective slots in a generally cylindrical drum with its axis parallel to and displaced radially from that of said hub, the slots guiding the radial position of the vanes. Synchronizing means, such as a gear train, cause the hub and drum to rotate in the same direction and at the same speed, with the vanes reciprocating and oscillating in the guide slots. A housing encloses the vanes and cooperates with them and the drum to provide a series of working spaces, one for each vane to compress or expand a fluid. Intake and exhaust ports lead fluid into and from the working spaces.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United StatessPatent 1 1 n] 3,813,191 Foster i 1 May 28,1974

1 1 ROTARY VANE DEVICE FOR COMPRESSOR, MOTOR OR ENGINE Berry W. Foster, 2415 Thomas Ave., Redondo Beach, Calif. 90278 Filed: Apr. 12, 1973 Appl.- No.: 350,632

Related US. Application Data Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 268,866, May 1, 1972, Pat. No. 3,747,573, which is a continuation of Ser. No. 41.008, May 22, 1970.

Inventor:

References Cited UNlTED STATES PATENTS 9/1912 Carroll 417/348 3/1919 417/348 8/1972 417/406 7/1973 Foster 418/137 COMPRESSOR DISCHARGE FOR HIGH PRESSURE COMPRESSOR lNTAKE FOR, LOW -PRESSURE GASES Primary Examiner-C. .1. Husar Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Owen, Wickersham &

Erickson [57] ABSTRACT An integral vane compressor and vane motor. At least three vanes are pinned to a central hub and extend through respective slots in a generally cylindrical drum with its axis parallel to and displaced radially from that of said hub, the slots guiding the radial position of the vanes. Synchronizing means, such as a gear train, cause the hub and drum to rotate in the same direction and at the same speed, with the vanes reciprocating and oscillating in the guide slots. A housing encloses the vanes and cooperates with them and the drum to provide a series of working spaces, one for each vane to compress or expand a fluid. lntakeand exhaust ports lead fluid into and from the working spaces.

2 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures Moron INTAKE FOR HOT HIGH PRESSURE GASES \MOTOR EXHAUST FOR GASES PATENTEUMY 2 w 3.8 13191 sum 1 (IF. 7

PATENTEDmzs 1911 3.813.191 SHEET '4 0f 7 FIG. 5

PMENTEMHB I914 38131191 SHEEI 7 0F 7 COMPRESSOR DISCHARGE MOTOR INTAKE FOR FOR HIGH -PRESSURE HOT HIGH PRESSURE OASES\ GASES l 4313 COMPRESSOR INTAKE \MOTOR EXHAUST EOR EOR LOW-PRESSURE I OASES OASES ROTARY VANE DEVICE FOR COMPRESSOR, MOTOR ENGINE No. 3,747,573 which was a continuation of application Ser. No. 41,008 filed May 22, I970.

BACKGROUND AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to an integral vane compressor and vane motor.

A feature of the rotary vane device of this invention is that the vanes are pinned to a central hub-shaft, and it has a separate circular drum to help transmit torque through the vanes and to guide the radial direction of the vanes. The'vanes are pinned at their centers of gravity to the central hub-shaft, so that they can oscillate back and forth as the central hub-shaft rotates; as a result, the mechanism is kept in dynamicbalance. The central hub shaftsupports the full centrifugal pull of the vanes; consequently, they have no friction drag at their tips where they nearly. (but not quite) touch the housing. y

The central hub-shaft and the'circular drum both rotate at the samespeed and in the same direction, but the center of rotation of the circular drum is offset from the center of rotation of the central hub-shaft.-The radius of the circular drum is smaller than the radial distance from the hub center to the tips of the extended vanes in every position of their rotation. The circular drum preferably has equally spaced axial slots at its outer periphery, one for each vane; these axial slots are preferably just big enough so that the vanes are forced to oscillate andreciprocate in themas the drum and shaft rotate. As the shaft and drum rotate and the vanes are forced to rotate and oscillate, their tipsform a circumscribed surface.

The housing of my new rotaryvanedevice is slightly larger than the circumscribed surface of the vanes; thus there is no friction betweenthe vanes and the housing. The housing may be provided with an intake port and an exhaust port. The space bounded between two adjacent vanes, the cylindrical surface of the drum between these vanes, and the cylindrical and disc surfaces of the housing constitutes the working space. There may be three or more working spaces in each device, and the volume of each working space varies as the drum and the hub-shaft rotate in the stationary housing. For example, the maximum volume of this working space is l80 out of phase with its minimum volume. I

In the compressor portion, the intake port is closed by a rotary vane just after the working space is largest; as the vanes and drum rotate, decreasing the volume of the working space, they give an isentropic compression of the trapped gases. The compressed gases are then forced out of the workingspace through a discharge port located where the working space is smallest.

In the motor portion, used to expand compressed pressed gas and expand it until the working space is at its largest volume;then the exhaust port opens to exhaust low pressure gases asthe working space becomes smaller.

The integral vane compressor and vane motor have a compressor intake port for low pressure gases, a compressor discharge port for high-pressure gases. :1 motor intake port for hot high-pressure gases and a motor exhaust port for exhaust gases. The compressor intake port and the motor exhaust port may connect to the same working space. A blower may be used to force a fresh charge into the intake port. A jet pump action of the exhaust gases flowing out and the fresh charge flowing in may exhaust, charge, and scavenge the common working space for the intake and exhaust ports. This integral vane compressor and vane motor may be used similar to a turbocharger. Also, it may be used similar to a gas turbine, wherein the compressor and motor use the same wheel; The working spaces for the vane motor may expand to a larger volume than the intake volume for they vane compressor; thus the device will generate shaft power similar to a gas turbine. As an alternate design the working spaces for the vane motor may expand to a volume equal to or only slightly larger than the intake volume for the compressor; in this case the vane device acts like a turbo-charger ora gas turbine gas generator which may supply gases to a free-running gas turbine.

' BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 3 is a view in section taken along the line 3-3 in FIG. 2, showing the end view of the gears.

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary view in section of a modified form of the device that may be used as a compressor or a motor,.depending on whether the hub-shaft and the drum rotate clockwise, when it acts as a compressor, or counterclockwise, when it acts as a motor or steam engme..

FIG. 5 is an end view in section of the engine of FIG. 4 showing the adjustable sliding circular valve for regulating the cutoff point for steam or compressed gas expan'sion in the vane motor.

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary detail view of a portion of the motor, showing a spring seal ring to contain the lubrieating oil inside the'drum.

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary enlarged view, partly diagrammatic, of the gear box with part of the hub shaft broken away to show parts otherwise obscured.

FIG. 8 is a diagram relative to the geometry of the vanes, hub, and drum as they rotate.

FIG. 9 is a block flow diagram showing how the rotary vane device maybe used as an integral vane compressor and vane motor.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PARTS AND THEIR OPERATION I The vane engine 10 of FIGS. I to 3 comprises a gen- 3 erally cylindrical housing 11. A hub-shaft 12 rotates about a center line 13, having its bearings on or supported by the housing 11 (FIG. 2). In the design shown, the hub-shaft 12 has eight equally spaced piano hinges 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, (which may be pinned at the ends only or as shown) and eight vanes 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, and 38 are pinned at their center of gravity to respective piano hinge points 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, and 28 by means of shafts 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, and 48. Each of the vanes 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38 may have a counter mass 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, so that as the vanes oscillate about their respective shafts 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, the hubshaft 12 remains in dynamic balance as it rotates. Although eight vanes are shown in FIG. 1, any number of equally spaced vanes greater than three may be used.

A drum 14 rotates about a center line 15 which is displaced from the hub center line 13 by the distance y. The drum 14 has its bearing on the housing 11. The drum 14 and the hub-shaft 12 are synchronized to rotate in the same direction and at the same rotating speed. The drum 14 has slots 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68 at its outer diameter, and these slots are just large enough for the corresponding vanes 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38 to slide and oscillate in as the hub-shaft 12 and the drum 14 rotate. Between adjacent axial slots 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68 there may be gusseted arch or beam sections 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78 with cooling ports or tubes 79. The drum 14 may have discs 16 and 17 (FIG. 2) at its ends for supporting the gusseted arc sections 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78. The discs 16 and 17 also support the bearings 18 and 19 for the drum 14 on the housing 11. The disc 16 may also be provided with an internal gear 80 (FIG. 3).

The mechanism for synchronizing the hub-shaft 12 and the drum 14 may comprise the internal gear 80 and a meshing spur gear 81, which is keyed to a shaft 82 that has its bearings on the housing 11. Also keyed to shaft 82 is a second spur gear 83. The spur gear 83 may be meshed with a pinion gear 84, which is also meshed to a third spur gear 85, or, as shown in FIG. 7, the gear 84 is keyed to a shaft 84a that also carries a gear 84b meshed to the gear 85. The spur gear 85 is keyed to the hub-shaft 12. The pinion gear 84 has its shaft bearings on the housing 11. The pitch diameter and teeth of the gears 80, 81, 83, 84, and 85 are prescribed so that the hub-shaft 12 and the drum 14 are synchronized to rotate in the same direction and at the same rotating speed.

As shown in FIG. 7, the gears have the following pitch diameters:

diameter and the pitch diameters are related so that 01/02 X 03/04 X D.' Dfi Power may be transmitted through the shaft 12 or the shaft 82 or both of them. The housing 11 may be provided with cooling fins 86.

For the engine device of FIG. 1, the housing 11 may be provided with an intake scavenging and exhaust port 87. A fan 88, which is keyed to the hub-shaft 12, may be used to blow a fresh charge of air through the open port 87 to help scavenge the expanded gases out of the exhaust, to cool the vanes 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, and 38 and to cool the outer surface of each drum beam section 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78 when it is at the port 87. Also. the fan air flows past the cooling fins 86 to cool the engine housing 11 and blows air through the cooling passages 79 between the gussets and the arcuate segments in the beam elements 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, and 78.

The hub-shaft 12 rotates clockwise, and when, for example, the vane 36 moves past the position 89 of the housing 11, a fresh charge is trapped in a working space 96 bounded by the adjacent vanes 36 and 37, the outer surface of the beam element 76, and the inner surface of the housing 11 between the tips of the vanes 36, 37 and side disc section of the housing 2. Each of the adjacent vanes 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38 has a working space 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98. (For a three vane engine there would be three working spaces; for every vane, no matter how many, there is a corresponding working space.) A fuel injector 99 may inject fuel into each working space 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, in turn as it moves past it.

As the hub-shaft 12 and the drum 14 move clockwise, they force the vanes 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38 to follow a prescribed movement and the working space 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98 becomes smaller, thus compressing the gases trapped in it in a manner approaching isentropic compression. When each space is in the top position (where the space 91 is in FIG. 1), it has been reduced to its smallest volume, and a spark ignition system 100 is timed to explode the fuel in the space 91 and heat it substantially by a constant volume process to increase its pressure and force the vanes to turn the hub-shaft 12 clockwise, so the hot gases will expand and do work on the engine shaft. When the vanes 31, etc., reach the position 101 of the housing 11, the hot expanded gases in the space 91, etc., are exhausted centrifugally by the centrifugal action of rotation. Also, the fan 88 forces exhaust gases to flow axially out of the port 87.

ln FIGS. 4 and 5 the rotary vane compressor or motor has most of the same parts as the engine 10 and are given the same reference numerals. The basic differences are that the fuel injector 99 and the spark ignition system 100 are eliminated, and in place of the common exhaust, scavenging, and intake port 87 shown for the engine 10, the housing 111 of the compressor or motor 110 has an intake port 112 separate from the discharge port 113, and these ports 112 and 113 are located diametrically opposite each other. Also, the vanes 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, and 37 are practically inside the drum 114, when its respective working space 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198 is at its minimum volume, which is equal to the working tolerances between the housing 111 and the drum 114 multiplied by the vane width.

When operating as a vane compressor 110, the intake port 112 is closed as the vane 31, 32, etc., is forced past the edge 115 of the port 112 by means of clockwise rotation of hub-shaft 12 and the drum 114. The working space 191,192, etc., may be close to its largest volume just after the vane 31, 32, etc., closes the intake port 1 5 112 at the station 115. As the compressor rotates clockwise, the working space 191, 192, etc., is reduced, and the trapped gases are compressed approximately adiabatically until the vanes 31, 32, etc., move past the station 116 in the housing 111 to open the space 191, 192, etc., to the discharge port 113. The compressed gases are preferably forced out of the space 191, 192, etc., through the discharge port 113 into a compressed gas accumulator (not shown). When the vanes 31, 32, etc., rotate past a station 117, a small volume of compressed gas is trapped in the space 191, 192, etc., this trapped compressed gas expands approximately isentropically and does work on the vanes 31, 32, etc., as the space 191, 192, etc., increases. When the vanes 31, 32, etc., pass a station 118, the compressed gas in the space 191, 192, etc., is substantially equal to the pressure of the gas in the intake port 112. In order to increase the volumetric efficiency of the compressor, the volume of space 191, 192, etc., as the vane 31, 32, etc., moves past the station 117 should be kept to a minimum.

When the device 110 is operation as a vane motor or steam engine, the motor turns in a counterclockwise direction. Compressed gas or steam, etc., flows from the accumulator, not shown, through the port 113, which is now the intake port, into the working space 191, 192, etc. After the vanes 31, 32, etc., move past the station 116, the compressed gases are trapped in the working space 191, 192, etc. As the motor rotates counterclockwise, the working space 191, 192, etc., increases in volume and the compressed gases expand approximately isentropically'to do work on the vanes 31, 32, etc., until they move past the station 115 to open port 112, which is now the exhaust port. When the exhaust port 112 is open, the pressure in theworking spaces 191, 192, etc., is substantially the same as the gases in the exhaust port 112, except when the cutoff point is increased. After the vane 31, 32, etc., moves past the station 118, gases are trapped in the space 191, 192, etc.; this trapped gas is approximately isentropically compressed back to the pressure in the accumulator as the working space 191, 192, etc., is reduced. In order to increase the efficiency of the motor, the mass of gas which is compressed back to theaccumulator pressure is designed .to be a minimum. When the, 31, 32, etc., rotates past the station 117, the compressed gases are returned back to the intake port 112 to be combined with more compressed gases for another expansion work cycle.

In order to increase the motor torque per revolution an arcuate cutoff valve 120 (FIG. 5) may be turned counterclockwise to give the desired cutoff volume 191, 192, etc. For full admission, an arcuate valve 121 may be turned counterclockwise. The compressed gases flow axially from a chamber 122 through the arc ports into the working spaces 191, 192, etc.

In order to contain lubricating oil inside the drum 14 or 114, leaf spring scrapers 130 (FIG. 6) may be used to scrape the oil of the vanes 31, 32, etc., and keep it inside the drum 14 for lubricating the pivot shafts 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, thebearings for the hub-shaft 12 and the bearings 18 and 19 for the drum-l4. The

scrapers 130 may be secured to each bridge section 71, i

72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, by means of screws 131 and a nut plate 132 or a quick disconnect clamp. The beam section 14 has an arcuate surface for the spring 130 to follow as it flexes; so it will have fatigue stresses which are below the endurance limit of the spring steel 130. As the vanes 31, 32, etc., reciprocate and oscillate in the slots 61, 62, etc., the leaf spring scrapes the excess lubricating oil of the vanes 31, 32, etc., so it will be contained inside the drum 14; just sufficient oil is left on the vane 31, 32, etc., to lubricate the rubbing surface between the vanes 31, 32, etc., and the slots 61, 62, etc.

In order to limit the flow of compressed gas into the drum 14 to a minimum, seal bars 200 may be provided in axial slots 201 in the ends of the beam arcs 71, etc., that bear on the vanes 31 to 38. Metal springs 202 or other fluidpressure means may be used to keep the seal bars 200 tight against the vanes, and the bars 200 fit snugly in the axial slots 201, thus a minimum flow of compressed gas passes from the working space 91-98 into the drum 14. v

The geometry of the rotary vanes is illustrated in FIG.

8. When a vane 31 is in its zero 0 position, the radial line R from the centerline of the drum 14 passes through the centerline of the hub-shaft 12 and through the pivot point of this vane 31. This radial line R also passes through the centerline of the vane 31 and is collinear with the radial line r from the centerline of the hub-shaft 12. Thus, the angle a between the centerline of the vane 31 and the radial line r is also zero when 0 0. P, r+ I P, maximum.

As the hub-shaft 11 and the drum 14 rotate clockwise, the angle or increases, and the blade tip leads the rotoryand the radial lines r and R remain parallel to each other. The vane 31 (whose length is I) bears on the drum 14 (R) at a distance e from the pivot point. Thus, thetip of the vane I will be at a radial distance P, from the centerline of the hub. As the vane rotates from its 6 0 position to its 0 90 1r/2 radians position, the angle a increases and reaches a maximum when 0= 90; likewise, the radial distance P, is a minimum when 0 90.

As the vane rotatespast its 9 90 position, the angle or decreases, and the radial distance P, increases until 0 l80 7r radians, where P, r I P, maximum again, and where a 0 again.

As the vane rotates past its 6 position,'the angle or becomes negative, and the vane tip lagsbehind the rotor. The radial lines r and R remain parallel to each other, and the radial distance P, from the hub centerline to the tip of the vane I again decreases until the vane reaches its 0 270 position, where P, is at its minimum radial position again and the angle a is at its negative maximum.

As the vane rotates past its 0 270 31r/2 position, the angle 0: decreases and the radial distance P, increases until 0 360 211' radians, where P, r l P, maximum again, and a 0 agaimThe cycle for one vane is then completed and will be repeated.

All of the vanes 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, undergo the same cycle asthe vane 31. If there are n vanes, they may be placed 21r/n radians apart, so that there will be equal working spaces between vanes.

The surface which the vane tips circumscribe as they rotate and oscillate about the hub shaft can be derived mathematically; they can be written in polar coordinates with the origin at the centerline of the hub-shaft 12. For a prescribed design, the only variable is the angle 0. The angle 0 is zero when a radial line drawn from the centerline of the drum first passes through the centerline of the hub shaft then through the pivot point of the vane and through the centerline of the vane. The vane is in its straight line extended position at 0 and P r 1 which is at its largest radius.

The fixed parameters for a prescribed design are: c the distance between the centerlines of the drum and the hub shaft. h the width of the slot in which the vane recipro' cates and oscillates. I the length of the vane from its pivot point to its extended position. r= the radial distance from the hub centerline to the vane pivot point, and R the radius of the drum where the drum bears on the vane. The variable parameters are:

the distance from the vane pivot point to its slot bearing point at R. l the thickness of the vane at e. P the radius from the hub centerline to the vane tip. V 0 the angle of the hub and drum measured from the radial line drawn from the drum centerline to the centerline of the hub shaft. The equation for the radius of the circumscribed surface of the vane tip with its origin at the hub centerline The equation for the distance from the vane pivot point to the point where the drum bears on the drum is:

The equation for the thickness of the vane is:

csin6 These equations may be derived as follows: The distances between the parallel radial lines R and r at angle 0:

s 0 sin 0.

The chord segment distance a for the vane contact at radius R to the vane pivot point at a (R-r) sin 6 The minimum distance I) from the vane pivot point to the chord. a line normal to the chord:

b (R-r) cos 0 c The hypotenuse e of the triangle abe:

e a h (R-r) (sin 0 cos 0) 2(Rr) 0 cos 0 +0 This gives the second equation shown above. The sine of the angle a between the radial line r and 5 the vane centerline 1:

The cosine law is used to get the radius of curvature P, of the surface circumscribed by the vane with respect to the star shaft centerline.

cos a V 1-sin a which is the first equation given above.

The angle B between the vane and the radial line R:

' For a constant slot I1 in the drum at radius R, to determine the vane thickness I with respect to the distance H e from the vane pivot point, so that it will fit snugly in h:

= P /sin a sin (b r/P sin a The area A at 0,:

A, z A (le,) (rlP sin a, [l (r/P,,) sin a, tan 01,]

The area A,, of the working space for n vanes of constant thickness 1:

sin a; [1( :x sin or tan 02 11} The working space or working volume is V the working area times the width of the vane s.

An integral vane compressor and vane motor 30 is shown in FIG. 9. It has a compressor intake port3ll, a compressor exhaust port 312, a motor intake po 313', and a motor exhaust port 314.

The compressor intake port 311 to each working space is. closed by a'vane after that working space achieves its largest volume,v low pressure gas being compressed in that working space as it is made smaller. The compressed gas, after it has been compressed to a desired pressure level, is discharged through the compressor exhaust 312, the compressor exhaust port 312 being passed by the vane just before the working space achieves its smallest volume.

The vane then opens the working space to high pressure gas flowing into the motor intake port 313 just after the working space passes its smallest volume. The motor intake port 313 remains open until the space between the vanes is at a prescribed value, then the next vane moving to close the working space off from the intake port 3l3 traps compressed gas in the working space. The working space increases in volume,'and the compressed gas expands to do work on the vanes and members rotatingtherwith until the working space is near its largest volume; I then the working space is opened by a vane to the motor exhaust port 314, so that the expanded gases are exhausted. The momentum of the hot gases forces them to flow out radially andtangentially, or flow out in radial and tangential directions, while a fan or other device scavenges the hot gases, axially or otherwise, so that afresh charge is blown into the working space where it enters the compressor intake port 311. v

To those skilled in the art to which this invention relates, many changes in construction and widely differing embodiments and applications of the invention will suggest themselves without departingfrom the spirit and scope of the invention. The disclosures and the description herein are purely illustrative and are not intended to be in any sense limiting.

I claim: v

1. An integral vane-compressor and vane motor having compressor intake port means and :exhaust port means and motor intake port means and exhaust port means, comprising: I

a rotating central hub having a series of vane pivot points spaced therearound at equal radii-from the center of the hub, r

at least three vanes, each pinned atits center of gravity to said hub at a said pivot point,

a generally cylindrical drum with its axis parallel'to and displaced radially from that of said hub, said drum having a separate slot for each vane through which the vane extends, for guiding the radial positionof each said vane,

synchronizing means mechanically linking said hub and said drum so that they rotate in the same direction and at the same rotating speed. so that said vanes reciprocate and oscillate in said guide slots as the hub and drum rotate,

a housing enclosing said vanes and cooperating with said vanes and said drum to provide a series of working spaces, one for each said vane to compress or expand afluid, and

intake and exhaust port means for leading fluid into andfrom said working spaces,

said compressor intake port means to each working space being closed by a said vane after that working space achieves its largest volume, low pressure gas being compressed in said workingispace as it is made smaller, the compressed gas, after it has been compressed to a desired pressure level, being discharged through said compressor exhaust port means,

said compressor exhaust port means being passed by said vane just before 'said working space achieves its smallest volume,

said vane then opening said working space to high pressure gas flowing into said motor intake port means just after said working space passes its smallest volume, said motor intake port means remaining open until the space between said vanes is at a prescribed value, then the next said vane moving to close said working space off from said intake port means and to trap compressed gas in said working space,

said working space increasing in volume and said compressed gas expanding to do work on the vanes and members rotating therewith until said working space is near its largest volume,

then said working space being opened by a said vane to said motor exhaust port means, so that said expanded gases are exhausted;

the centrifugal force of the hot gases forcing them to flow out radially and a fan for scavenging said hot gases axially so that a fresh charge is blown into the working space where it enters said compressor intake port means.

2. An integral vane compressor and vane motor having compressor intake port means and exhaust port means and motor intake port means and exhaust port means, comprising? a rotating central hub having a series of vane pivot points spaced therearound at equal radii from the center of the hub,

at least three vanes, each pinned at its center of gravity to said hub at a said pivot point,

a generally cylindrical drum with its axis parallelto and displaced radially from that of said hub, said drum having a separate slot for each vane through which the vane extends, for guiding the radial position of each said vane,

synchronizing means mechanically linking said hub and said drum so that they rotate in the same direction and at the same rotating speed, so that said vanes reciprocate and oscillate in said guide slots as the hub and drum rotate,

a housing enclosing said vanes and cooperating with said vanes and said drum to provide a series of working spaces, one for each said vane to compress or expand a fluid, and

intake and exhaust port means for leading fluid into and from said working spaces.

said compressor intake port means to each working space being closed by a said vane after that working space achieves its largest volume, low pressure gas being compressed in said working space as it is made smaller, the compressed gas, after it has been compressed to a desired pressure level, being discharged through said compressor exhaust port means,

said compressor exhaust port means being passed by said vane just before said working space achieves its smallest volume,

said vane then opening said working space to high pressure gas flowing into said motor intake port means just after said working space passes its smallest volume, said motor intake port means remaining open until the space between said vanes is at a prescribed value, then the next said vane moving to close said working space off from said intake port means and to trap compressed gas in said working space,

said working space increasing in volume and said compressed gas expanding to do work on the vanes and members rotating therewith until said working space is near its largest volume,

then said working space being opened by a said vane to said motor exhaust port means. so that said expanded gases are exhausted;

the momentum of the hot gases forcing them to flow out in a radial and tangential direction, and

means for scavenging said hot gases so that a fresh charge is blown into the working space where it enters said compressor intake port means.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5664940 *Nov 3, 1995Sep 9, 1997Flojet CorporationGas driven pump
US5833439 *Aug 22, 1997Nov 10, 1998Du; Benjamin R.Slide valve of a gas driven pump
US6062427 *Aug 27, 1998May 16, 2000Du Investments L.L.C.Beer keg and pre-mixed beverage tank change-over device
US6099264 *Aug 27, 1998Aug 8, 2000Itt Manufacturing Enterprises, Inc.Pump controller
US6343539Nov 10, 1999Feb 5, 2002Benjamin R. DuMultiple layer pump diaphragm
US7074016 *May 23, 2003Jul 11, 2006Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologyPlanar turbopump assembly
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EP0067307A2 *May 10, 1982Dec 22, 1982Volkswagen AktiengesellschaftSliding-vane compressor
Classifications
U.S. Classification417/406, 417/348
International ClassificationF01C1/352, F01C17/02, F01C17/00, F01C1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF01C17/02, F01C1/352
European ClassificationF01C17/02, F01C1/352