Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3813514 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 28, 1974
Filing dateOct 16, 1972
Priority dateOct 16, 1972
Publication numberUS 3813514 A, US 3813514A, US-A-3813514, US3813514 A, US3813514A
InventorsJ Canty
Original AssigneeJ Canty
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Light piping unit for supplying radiant energy to the interior of a pressure vessel
US 3813514 A
Abstract
A light piping unit for use in supplying radiant energy to the interior of a pressure vessel having an internal operating pressure differing from ambient pressure external to the vessel. The unit includes an elongated optical light pipe formed intermediate its ends with an integral frusto-conically shaped mounting surface. The light pipe extends through an aperture in the wall of the pressure vessel with the mounting surface thereof in fluid sealed engagement with a cooperating frusto-conically shaped mounting surface defined in a mounting fixture attached to the vessel. The mounting surfaces of the light pipe and fixture are maintained in pressure-fluid sealing engagement with each other by the difference between the vessel operating and the ambient pressures acting on the inner and outer ends of the light pipe. A radiant energy source is accurately supported in proximity to an essentially conically shaped outer end of the light pipe either directly by the light pipe or by the mounting fixture.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

l also-96.2

muss

o SR

United States Patent Canty 1 May 28, 1974 flL LIGHT PIPING UNIT FOR SUPPLYING RADIANT ENERGY TO THE INTERIOR OF A PRESSURE VESSEL Inventor: John M. Canty, 117 Cornwell Ave., Tonawanda, NY. 14150 Filed: Oct. 16, 1972 Appl. N0.: 297,801

US. Cl 219/354, 219/338, 219/347, 219/357, 240/1 LP, 250/227, 350/96 R Int. Cl. H05b l/00, GOZb 5/14 Field of Search 219/347, 354, 553, 342, 219/357, 338, 411; 240/1 El,'l LP, 10 L,

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 9/1951 Shannon 350/96 R 3/1957 Haynes et al. 240/1 EL 78 6/1959 8/1966 24 11/1966 70 l/1967 6/1971 Haggstrom. Kawecki Witt et al.

Primary Examiner-A. Bartis Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Bean & Bean 1 57] ABSTRACT A light piping unit for use in supplying radiant energy to the interior of a pressure vessel having an internal operating pressure differing from ambient pressure external to the vessel. The unit includes an elongated optical light pipe formed intermediate its ends with an integral frusto-conically shaped mounting surface. The

light pipe extends through an aperture in the wall of the pressure vessel with the mounting surface thereof in fluid sealed engagement with a cooperating frustoconically shaped mounting surface defined in a mounting fixture attached to the vessel. The mounting surfaces of the light pipe and fixture are maintained in pressure-fluid sealing engagement with each other by the difference between the vessel operating and the ambient pressures acting on the inner and outer ends of the light pipe. A radiant energy source is accurately.

supported in proximity to an essentially conically shaped outer end of the light pipe either directly by the light pipe or by the mounting fixture.

13 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures I PATENIEDmza m4 SHEET 2 BF 2 Fig. 6.

LIGHT PIPING UNIT FOR SUPPLYING RADIANT ENERGY TO THE INTERIOR OF A PRESSURE VESSEL SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention broadly relates to the utilization of so-called fiber optic material, such as acrylic plastic, for transmitting radiant energy in the form of light and/or heat from an external source into a pressure vessel, particularly where vessel environment is hostile to electrical wiring and/or the vessel has a limited amount of usable internal space. More particularly, the invention relates'to a compact, readily inof the light pipe or on a light pipe enclosing tube car ried by the mounting fixture.

In a preferred form of the present invention, the light pipe and mounting fixture are formed with frustoconically shaped mounting surfaces, which are maintained in pressure-fluid sealing engagement by the difference between ambient or atmospheric and vessel pressure conditions. For installations wherein there exists only slight differences between ambient and vessel pressures and/or when the vessel pressure conditions are variable the fixture may be provided with additional devices for positively maintaining the light pipe properly seated in pressure-fluid sealed relationship therewith.

DRAWINGS The nature and mode of the present invention will now be more fully described in the following detailed description taken with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. I is a side view ofthe light piping unit of the present invention with parts broken away for purposes of clarity;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged view of the light pipe illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary sectional view of an alternative form of the lightpiping unit adapted for use with vacuum vessels;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary sectional view of an other alternative form of the light piping unit adapted for use with pressurized vessels; and

FIGS. 5 through 7 are fragmentary sectional views illustrating modifications of the unit of FIG. 4.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Reference is now made particularly to FIG. 1, wherein the light piping unit of the present invention is generally designated as'l0 and shown as including an elongated light pipe 12 having an essentially circular cross-sectional configuration; a fixture 14 for mounting light pipe 12 in pressure-fluid sealed relationship within an aperture 16 formed in the wall 18 of a pressure vessel; and a unit 20 for defining a source of radiant energy in the form of light and/or heat.

Light pipe 12 is best shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 as having an inner or diffuser end portion 22 having a suitably configured radiant energy outlet surface 24; an inter-. mediate portion 26, which is stepped to define an integrally formed annular mounting surface 28; and an outer .end portion 30, which is formed with a suitably configured radiant energy entrance face or surface 32. Light'pipe 12 may be of any suitable fiber optic material, such as cast acrylic plastic.

Mounting fixture 14 is of two partconstruction including a first part in the form of an internally threaded outer sleeve 34, which is suitably fixed in a pressurefluid sealed relationship to the outer surface of wall 18 concentrically of aperture 16, as by welding; and a second part in the form of an internally threaded inner sleeve 36, which is threadably received by sleeve 34 having its through opening stepped to define an annular mounting surface 38, as shown in FIG. 1. As will be apparent, sleeves 34 and 36 cooperate to define an opening 39, which is aligned with aperture 16 and adapted to removably receive light pipe 12. Preferably, mounting surfaces 28 and 38 are complimentary and are of frusto-conical configuration and have like cone angles on the order of about 45. In the arrangement shown vessel pressure in excess of ambient or atmospheric pressure is employed to force mounting surface 28 into pressure-fluid sealing engagement with mounting surface 38, and thereby maintain light pipe' 12 seated relative to mounting fixture 14. Thus, in this arrangement, surface 28 faces towards outer end portion 30 and surface 38 faces towards vessel 18. It is convenient to pro vide mounting fixture 14 with a set screw or like device 40 in order to facilitate assembly of the unit and to prevent displacement of the mounting surfaces when pressure within the vessel is reducedto ambient condition.

Unit 20 is shown in FIG. I as including a housing 42, which serves to enclose a radiant energy source in the form of an electric light bulb 44, a light bulb associated reflector 46 and a holder device 48 adapted to removably mount a heat filter plate 50 permeable to light rays. When filter 50 is removed, heat as well as light from bulb 44 is applied to inlet surface 32 and transmitted by the light pipe into the pressure vessel.

. In a preferred form of the present invention, housing 42 is removably fixed to the outer end of light pipe by a conventional tube coupling device 51, which includes a shouldered compression sleeve 52, nuts 54 and 56 and a deformable clamping sleeve 57. As will be apparent, sleeve 52 is slideably fitted onto endportion 30, nut 54 is threaded onto sleeve 52 for the purpose of clamping a housing wall portion 42a therebetween and nut 56 is threaded onto sleeve 52 for the purpose of deforming sleeve 57 into friction grippingengagement with the outer surface of the light pipe.

In situations where it is desired to project a concentrated beam of light into the pressure vessel, inlet surface 32 and outlet surface 24 may be relatively flat. However, where it is desired to diffuse or direct light into all cornersof the pressure vessel, I prefer to employ the essentially conically shaped inlet surface and the hemispherically-shaped outlet surface configuration illustrated in the drawings, wherein the inlet surface is spaced from reflector 46 such as to position the latters focal point within the body of the light pipe at the point generally designated as F.P." Outlet surface 24 may be roughened, as by sand blasting, to achieve maximum light dispersion. The'cone angle d) of surface 32 is determined by the equation (it 6 B, wherein B sin (sina/m), a (r11 (it) and critical angle 6 sin (1/n,-). Since III is known as being the cone angle for a given reflector 46, and n, is the known index of refraction of the light pipe, d) can be readily determined.

Coupling device 51 is provided with a suitable stop, such as a tab 58 suitably fixed to the outer end surface of sleeve 52, for the purpose of abutting against a marginal edge portion of surface 32 in order to insure accurate positioning of light bulb 44 and associated reflector 46 relative to such surface. This construction permits unit to be removed for maintenance and then repositioned on the light pipe without need for adjustment of the spacing between the parts.

FIG. 3 illustrates an alternative form of the present invention, which is particularly adapted for use with pressure vessels subject to vacuum operating conditions. In this construction, light pipe 120 and mounting fixture 14a are identical to those discussed with reference to FIG. 1, except that surfaces 28a and 38a are reversed, whereby to permit ambient air pressure to maintain a pressure-fluid seal between such mounting surfaces.

FIG. 4 illustrates an alternative construction wherein a two-part mounting fixture 14b is mounted inwardly of the vessel and includes a first part in the form of a sleevelikebracket 60, which is suitably fixed ina pressure-fluid sealed relationship to the inner surface of wall 18 concentrically of aperture 16, as by welding;

and a second part in the form of a mounting ring 62,

which is releasably clamped to bracket 60, as by threaded bolt devices 64, for the purpose of positively forcing light pipe mounting surface 28b into engagement with the fixture mounting surface 38b defined in this case by bracket 60. In this construction, the distance between mounting surface 28b and the light pipe outlet surface 24b is substantially shortened and the diameter of inner end 22b reduced to define: a shoulder 66 against which a deformable O-ring seal 68 is forced to bear by ring 62. This construction also differs from that described above with reference to FIG. 1, in that unit 20 is carried by the outer end of a light pipe protecting shielding tube 70, which is arranged concentrically outwardly of light pipe 12!) and has its inner end weld affixed to bracket 60; and stop 58)) is formed integrally with sleeve 52 and arranged to abut against the outer end'of tube 70.

The embodiments illustrated in FIGS. 5 and 6 are quite similar to that described with reference to FIG. 4, except that brackets 60a and 60b are formed with recesses 72a and 72b to receive additional O-ring seals 74a and 74b, which are adapted to seal against light pipes 120 and 12d, respectively.

The construction shown in FIG. 7 differs from that illustrated in FIG. 4 in that bracket 600 is removably affixed to the inner surface of wall 18 by bolt fasteners 80, and is provided with an annular slot 82 adapted to receive an O-ring 84.

I claim:

1. A light piping unit for use in supplying radiant energy to the interior of a pressure vessel having an internal operating pressure differing from ambient pressure external to the vessel, said vessel having an aperture formed in a wall thereof, which comprises in combinatron:

a fixture attached in pressure-fluid sealed relationship relative to said vessel wall peripherally of said wall aperture, said fixture having an opening extending therethrough in alignment with said wall aperture and said fixture opening defining an annular mounting surface;

a light pipe formed of a fiber optic material, said light pipe being arranged to extend through said fixture opening and having an inner end portion arranged inwardly of said vessel to define a radiant energy outlet surface, an outer end portion arranged outwardly of said vessel to define a radiant energy entrance surface and an annular integrally formed mounting surface complementary to said fixture mounting surface and maintained in pressure-fluid sealing engagement with said fixture mounting surface by the difference between said vessel operating and ambient pressures acting on said inner and outer end portions;

a radiant energy source unit; and

mounting means for removably supporting said source unit outwardly of said vessel on one of said fixture and said outer end portion of said light pipe whereby to apply radiant energy to said light pipe entrance surface for transfer into said vessel through said light pipe.

2. A unit according to claim 1, wherein said mounting surfaces are of frusto-conical configuration and have like cone angles.

3. A unit according to claim 2, wherein each of said cone angles is approximately 45.

4. A unit according to claim 1, wherein said source unit includes a housing carrying an electric light bulb and a reflector for directing radiant energy from said bulb onto said light pipe entrance surface, and said mounting means releasably clamping said housing to said outer end portion of said light pipe and including stop means engageable with said light pipe entrance surface to position said bulb and said reflector at a predetermined distance from said light pipe entrance surface.

5. A unit according to claim 4, wherein said fixture includes an outer sleeve affixed to an outer surface of said vessel wall and an inner sleeve threadably affixed to said outer sleeve and defining said fixture mounting surface.

6. A unit according to claim 1, wherein a tube is carried by said fixture concentrically outwardly of said light pipe, said source unit includes a housing for carrying an electric light bulb and a reflector for directing radiant energy from said bulb onto said light pipe entrance surface, and said mounting .means releasably clamping said housing onto an outer end of said tube and including stop means engageable with said outer end of said tube to position said bulb and said reflector at a predetermined distance from said light pipe entrance surface.

7. A unit according to claim 6, wherein said fixture includes a first part fixed to an inner surface of said vessel wall and defining said bounding surface thereof, and

a second part removably fixed to said first part for engagement with said inner end portion of said light pipe for positively maintaining said mounting surfaces seated in engagement, and an inner end of said tube extends inwardly through said wall aperture and is affixed to said first part.

8. A unit according to claim 7, wherein said inner end portion of said light pipe is formed with an annular shoulder intermediate said mounting surface and said light pipe outlet surface, and a deformable sealing device is clampingly secured against said shoulder by said second part.

9. A unit according to claim 1, wherein said source unit includes a housing carrying an electric light bulb and a reflector for directing light from said bulb onto said light pipe entrance surface, said light pipe entrance surface is essentially of conically shaped configuration having an apex portion thereof extending towards said bulb, and said mounting means includes stop means cooperating with one of said fixture and said light pipe for positioning said bulb and reflector at a predetermined distance from said light pipe entrance surface.

10. A light piping unit for use in supplying radiant en ergy to the interior of a pressure vessel having an internal operating pressure differing from ambient pressure external to the vessel, said vessel having an aperture formed in a wall thereof, which comprises in combination:

a fixture attached to said vessel wall peripherally of I said wall aperture, said fixture having an opening extending therethrough in alignment with said wall aperture;

a radiant energy source unit, said unit including a housing carrying an electric light bulb and a reflector for directing radiant energy from said bulb;

a light pipe fixed within said fixture opening, said light pipe having an outer end portion defining a radiant energy entrance surface and an inner end portion defining a radiant energy outlet surface; and

mounting means for removably mounting said housing on said outer end portion of said light pipe, said mounting means including stop means engageable with said light pipe entrance surface to position said bulb and said reflector at a predetermined distance from said light pipe entrance surface.

11. A light piping unit for use in supplying radiant energy to the interior of a pressure vessel having an internal operating pressure differing from ambient pressure external to the vessel, said vessel having an aperture formed in a wall thereof, which comprises in combinatron:

a fixture attached in pressure-fluid sealed relationship relative to said vessel wall peripherally of said wall aperture, said fixture having an opening extending therethrough in alignment with said aperture, and said fixture opening being stepped to define an annular mounting surface;

a light pipe supported within said fixture opening, said light pipe having an outer end portion defining a radiant energy entrance surface and an inner end portion defining a radiant energy outlet surface and an intermediate portion stepped to define an integrally formed annular mounting surface facing towards and being complementary to andmaintained in pressure-fluid sealing engagement with said fixture mounting surface by the difference between said vessel operating and ambient pressures acting on said inner and outer. end portions;

a radiant energy source unit; and

mounting means for removably supporting said source unitoutwardly of said vessel on one of said fixture and said outer end portion of said light pipe whereby to apply radiant energy to said light entrance surface for transfer into said vessel through said light pipe.

12. A light piping unit for use in supplying radiant energy to the interior of a pressure vessel having an internal operating pressure in excess of ambient pressure external to the vessel, said vessel having an aperture formed in a wall thereof, which comprises in combina tion: v

a fixture having outer and inner sleeves, said outer sleeve being attached in pressure-fluid sealed relationship relative to said vessel wall peripherally of said wall aperture, said inner sleeve being threadably connected to said outer sleeve and having a through opening arranged in alignment with said vessel opening, said inner sleeve opening being stepped to define an annular mounting surface facing towards said vessel;

a light pipe supported within said inner sleeve opening and having an integrally formed annular mounting surface complementaryto and disposed in pressure-fluid sealed engagement with said inner sleeve annular mounting surface, said light pipe having an outer end portion defining a radiant energy entrance surface and an inner end portion defining a radiant energy outlet surface;

a radiant energy source unit; and

mounting means for removably supporting said source unit outwardly of said vessel on one of said fixture and said outer end portion of said light pipe whereby to apply radiant energy to said light pipe entrance surface for transfer into said vessel through said light pipe.

13. A light piping unit for use in supplying radiant energy to the interior of a pressure vessel having an internal operating pressure differing from ambient pressure external to the vessel, said vessel having an aperture formed in a wall thereof, which comprises in combinatron:

a fixture having outer and inner sleeves, said outer sleeve being attached in pressure-fluid sealed relationship relative to said vessel wall peripherally of said wall aperture, said inner sleeve being threadably connected to said outer sleeve and having a through opening arranged in alignment with said vessel opening, said inner sleeve opening being stepped to define an annular mounting surface;

a light pipe supported within said inner sleeve opening and having an annular mounting surface disposed in pressure-fluid sealed engagement with said inner sleeve annular mounting surface, said light pipe having an outer end portion defining a radiant energy entrance surface and an inner end portion defining a radiant energy outlet surface;

a radiant energy source unit, said source unit includes a housing carrying an electric light bulb and a reflector for directing radiant energy; and

mounting means for removably supporting said source unit outwardly of said vessel on said light pipe whereby to direct radiant energy to said light pipe entrance surface for transfer into said vessel through said lightpipe, said mounting means re- ]easably clamping said housing to said outer end portion of said light pipe and including stop means engageable with said light pipe entrance surface to position said bulb and said reflector at a predetermined distance from said light pipe entrance surface.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2567036 *Aug 26, 1948Sep 4, 1951Bailey Meter CoFluid-tight light transmitting apparatus
US2786196 *Jun 14, 1954Mar 19, 1957Valentine E Macy JrPilot light
US2892378 *Apr 26, 1955Jun 30, 1959Gen ElectricIndicating turbidimeter
US3264462 *Sep 15, 1964Aug 2, 1966Independent Lock CoKey display device
US3283124 *May 7, 1965Nov 1, 1966IbmSelective heating apparatus
US3299770 *Sep 22, 1961Jan 24, 1967Honeywell IncLight to electrical energy transforming apparatus for continuously indicating the index of refraction
US3582637 *Jan 29, 1969Jun 1, 1971Welch Allyn IncMounting arrangement for a fiber optic reader and lamp assembly
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4279469 *Oct 3, 1977Jul 21, 1981The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavySeparable fiber optic cable connector
US4302069 *Dec 29, 1978Nov 24, 1981Niemi Gary AIllumination system and apparatus therefor
US4407012 *Jan 20, 1982Sep 27, 1983Regie Nationale Des Usines RenaultMulti-directional light source
US4469399 *Dec 30, 1981Sep 4, 1984The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyMethod of making an undersea, high pressure bulkhead penetrator for use with fiber optic cables
US4656562 *Sep 13, 1985Apr 7, 1987Santa Barbara Research CenterOptical integrator means for intensity modification of Gaussian beam
US4682846 *Nov 19, 1981Jul 28, 1987The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyHermetic high pressure fiber optic bulkhead penetrator
US4704660 *Mar 19, 1986Nov 3, 1987Lumenyte CorporationHigh-intensity light source for a fiber optics illumination system
US4746178 *Mar 26, 1987May 24, 1988Canty Thomas MLight pipe for illuminating the interior of a pressure vessel
US4763984 *Jan 2, 1987Aug 16, 1988Awai George KLighting apparatus and method
US4782430 *Jul 22, 1986Nov 1, 1988Lumenyte CorporationLight conduit illumination system for underwater lighting
US4800252 *Nov 12, 1983Jan 24, 1989Rivi EstablishmentApparatus for heating liquid media by infrared irradiation
US4814948 *Jul 2, 1987Mar 21, 1989Yasuo HasegawaLight-emitting-end mounting mechanism in optical display panel
US4825341 *Nov 17, 1987Apr 25, 1989Fiberstars, Inc.Cooled lighting apparatus and method
US4902876 *Oct 5, 1988Feb 20, 1990U.S. Philips Corp.Electrical cooking apparatus
US4924070 *Aug 10, 1989May 8, 1990Joshua FriedmanApparatus for controlled irradiation
US6002216 *Jun 26, 1998Dec 14, 1999Cedars-Sinai Medical CenterPool lighting system, illuminator, and method therefore
US7020388 *Feb 20, 2004Mar 28, 2006Marcus A MillsWater heating device with light bulb heat source whose light is transferred to another light receiving device
US8059946 *Oct 30, 2008Nov 15, 2011John Cletus WilliamsConcentrated thermal radiation transfer system from electrically produced source
EP0057626A2 *Jan 19, 1982Aug 11, 1982Regie Nationale Des Usines RenaultLuminous target for optical threedimensional measuring techniques and measuring method
EP0331064A1 *Feb 27, 1989Sep 6, 1989European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom)A ligthing device for illuminating closed environments
WO1986005858A1 *Mar 25, 1986Oct 9, 1986Lumenyte CorpHigh-intensity light source for a fiber optics illumination system
WO2012071669A1 *Nov 28, 2011Jun 7, 2012Genesis Health Light CorporationLiquid containing filter and hand held heat light
Classifications
U.S. Classification392/460, 392/408, 392/428, 385/138, 362/562, 392/416, 362/191
International ClassificationB01J3/00, F21V8/00, F21W131/411, F21S8/02, F21S8/00, G02B6/42, F21V33/00
Cooperative ClassificationF21W2131/411, F21V33/00, B01J3/004, F21V7/0066, G02B6/0005, G02B6/4298
European ClassificationB01J3/00D, F21V33/00, G02B6/00L4, G02B6/42L, F21V7/00H