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Publication numberUS3814093 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 4, 1974
Filing dateSep 10, 1971
Priority dateSep 10, 1971
Publication numberUS 3814093 A, US 3814093A, US-A-3814093, US3814093 A, US3814093A
InventorsGregory W
Original AssigneeGregory W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Controlled, misted oxygen dispenser
US 3814093 A
Abstract
The inflow rate of oxygen gas to a face mask is controlled by the speed of a motor driving a rotating metering device through which the oxygen is conducted. A valve regulated flow of liquid is introduced into the oxygen flow stream for baffled mixing therewith prior to entering the face mask. Exhalation outflow from the face mask is synchronized with the oxygen inflow by the metering device.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Gregory 1 1 CONTROLLED, MISTED OXYGEN DISPENSER [76] Inventor: Warren E. Gregory, PO. Box 184,

Hurtsboro, Ala. 36860 [221 Filed: Sept. 10,1971

211 App]. 110.; 179,411

[52] US. Cl 128/210, 128/1458, 128/194,

137/6252] [51] Int. Cl A6lm 15/00 [58] Field of Search 128/210, 209, 196, 197,-

12 /2o1.2o s, 19s, 205, 194, 184, 173, 173.1, 145.8; 239/338, 370; 137/6252],

[56] References Cited;

UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,785,768 3/1957 Gauchard 128/194 X 3,207,312 9/1965 Griswold..... 137/62521 X 3,237,644 3/1966 Beck et a1 137/625.2l X

1 June 4, 1974 3,291,122 12/1966 Engstrom et a1 128/173 R X 3,507,297 4/1970 Dunn l37/625.21 X

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 683.694 12/1952 Great Britain l37/625.2l

Primary Examiner-Richard A. Gaudet Assistant ExaminerLee S. Cohen Attorney, Agent, or Firm--Clarence A. OBrien; Harvey B. Jacobson [57] ABSTRACT The inflow rate of oxygen gas to a face mask is controlled by the speed of a motor driving a rotating metering device through which the oxygen is conducted. A valve regulated flow of liquid is introduced into the oxygen flow stream for baffled mixing therewith prior to entering the face mask. Exhalation outflow from the face mask is synchronized with the oxygen inflow by the metering device.

5 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures TENTH! JUN 4 I974 SHEET 2 BF 2 1 CONTROLLED, MISTED OXYGEN DISPENSER This invention relates to the controlled supply of a medicinally misted oxygen to a face mask in order to assist a patient having breathing difficulties or suffering from a respiratory ailment.

Generally, to assist a patient having breathing difficulties, oxygen is directly supplied at a regulated pressure from a tank to a breathing face mask, the inflow rate of oxygen being controlled by regulating the pressure of the oxygen entering the face mask. However, such apparatus does not provide means for controlling the flow rate in accordance with different breathing demands and does not provide facilities for introducing a medicinal solution to the oxygen flow stream where a misted breating atmosphere is prescribed. It is therefore an important object of the present invention to provide apparatus for controlling and metering the inflow rate of oxygen to a face mask and to provide means for regulating the inflow of a medicinal solution into the oxygen flow stream. A further object is to synchronize the exhalation outflow from the face mask with the oxygen inflow by means of the same. metering device through whichthe inflow rate is controlled.

In accordance with the present invention, the inflow rate of oxygen to a face mask is controlled by a metering device having a rotor formed with a plurality of apertures that are intermittently aligned with ports through which the oxygen is conducted at a rate determined by the rotational speed of the rotor. The same rotor similarly controls the outflow rate of carbon dioxide exhaled by the patient through the face mask. The metered flow of oxygen is conducted'through a novel mixing device within which the oxygen is baffled and mixed with a medicinal solution or liquid introduced at a controlled rate into the oxygen flow stream.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view showing a typical assem bly of apparatus in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged partial sectional view through the apparatus taken substantially through a plane indicated by section line 22 in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a transverse sectional view taken substantially through a plane indicated by section line 3-3 in FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a transverse sectional view taken substantially through a plane indicated by section line 4-4 in FIG. 2 with parts broken away.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the disassembled parts associated with the metering device forming part of the present invention.

Referring now to the drawings in detail, the apparatus of the present invention, generally referred to by reference numeral is shown mounted on a mobile frame 12. It should, of course, be appreciated that other mounting installations may be utilized. The frame also supports a source of oxygen under pressure such as the oxygen tank 14 from which oxygen gas under a controlled pressure is supplied to a flexible outlet conduit 16 upon opening of an outlet valve, as is well known. The oxygen gas under pressure is conducted to a patient to assist breathing, through a conventional face mask 18 to which the apparatus 10 is connected by means of a flexible inhalation conduit 20. In accordance with the present invntion, the exhale outlet of the face mask is connected by another flexible conduit 22 to the apparatus 10 in order to synchronize exhalation with inhalation at the controlled inflow rate dictated by the apparatus 10.

With continued reference to FIG. 1, the apparatus 10 includes a variable speed electric motor 24, the speed of which may be regulated by any suitable motor controller 26. As will be explained hereafter, the speed of the motor determines the oxygen inflow rate. Accordingly, the motor controller 26 may be utilized to adjust the motor speed in order to meet certain patient breathing requirements. The motor 24 is drivingly connected through asuitable gear reduction unit 28 to a meteringdevice generally referred to by reference numeral 30 to which the outlet conduit 16 from the oxygen tank 14 is connected by means of the hose section 32 as shown in FIG. 1. Oxygen gas under pressure is accordingly conducted through the metering device 30 and emerges therefrom for supply to a mixing device generally referred to by reference numeral 34 by means of an inlet tube 36 through which the metering device and mixing device are interconnected. A liquid medicinal solution is introduced into the oxygen flow stream entering the mixing device 34 from a liquid reservoir 36. A proportioning valve 38 may be opened by an adjusted amount in order to regulate the gravity assisted inflow rate of the liquid into the oxygen flow stream entering the mixing device 34. Thus, misted oxygen gas is fed from the mixing device 34 through the inhale tube 20 to the face mask. Exhaust of carbon dioxide from the patient on the other hand is synchronized with the inflow rate of misted oxygen by means of the metering device 30 to which the face mask is connected by the exhale conduit 22 as aforementioned. 1

As shown in FIGS. 2 and 5, the metering device 30 Includes an annular casing 40 having a mounting base 42. The casing 40 forms an internal bearing surface 44 within which a rotor disc 46 is rotatable. The rotor disc is keyed to a drive shaft 48that extends through the casing and is connected by means of coupling 50 to the output of the gear reduction unit 28. The rotor disc is axially spaced from a shoulder 52 formed internally in the casing 40 by means of a control disc 54 that is rotationally fixed to the casing by means of a threaded setscrew 56 received in an axial slot 58 formed in the periphery of the control disc 54. The rotor disc 46 is axially engaged with the control disc 54 on one side and is engaged with a second control disc 60 on the other side. The control disc 60 is held rotationally fixed to the casing by a second setscrew 62 engaged within a peripheral axial slot 64 formed in the control disc. Aligned openings 66 and 68 are formed centrally within the control discs 54 and 60 so that the drive shaft 48 may extend freely therethrough. The rotor disc and control discs are held axially assembled within the casing abutting the shoulder 52 by means of an annular. sleeve 70 slidably fitted within the bearing surface 44 of the casing and held axially fixed therein by means of fastener screws 72 extending radially through slots 74 formed in the casing as more clearly seen in FIG. 5.

As shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, the rotor disc 46 is provided with a radially inner series of circumferentially spaced apertures 76 and a radially outer series of circumferentially spaced, larger apertures 78. The radially inner apertures 76 are adapted to be intermittently registered with aligned ports 80 and 82 respectively formed in the control discs 54 and 60. Flow conducting tube sections 84 and 86 extend from the ports 80 and 82 and are respectively connected to the flexible tube section 32 and the inlet tube 36 as more clearly seen in FIG. 2. Thus, the flow rate of oxygen gas through the metering device 30 will be determined by the frequency with which the apertures 76 are in registry with the ports 80 and 82. The frequency of registration be-- tween the ports and the apertures 76 is determined by the rotational speed of the rotor disc 46. Accordingly, the rotational speed of the motor 24 driving the rotor disc will control or meter the flow rate of oxygen gas. Similarly, the outflow rate of exhaust from the face mask through the exhale tube 22 is controlled by rotation of the rotor disc 46 because of the intermittent registry between the apertures 78 and the aligned ports 88 and 90 respectively formed in the control discs 54 and 60. A tube section 92 is fixed to the control disc 60 and extends from the port 90 for connection to the exhale tube 22.

A lubricating film is established between the rotor disc 46 and the bearing surface 44 of the casing 42 and the axial bearing faces of the control discs 54 and 60. In order to minimize leakage and establish proper bearing pressure on the lubricating films, a pair of conical spring elements 94 and 96 are compressed against the control discs 54 and 60 and held in adjusted compressive states by collars 98 and 100 adjustably positioned and held fixed to the drive shaft 48 by setscrews 102.

Referring now to FIGS. 2 and 3 in particular, the inlet tube 36 from the metering device 30 is connected to the mixing device 34 by means of a T-coupling 104. The proportioning valve 38 is connected to the upstanding arm of the T-coupling 104 and supports thereabove the cup-like reservoir 36 within which the medicinal solution 106 is stored. Th proportioning valve 38 may be opened by means of its control knob 108 by an adjusted amount in order to regulate the gravity assisted inflow rate of liquid 106 into the oxygen flow stream conducted through the T-coupling 104.

One end of the T-coupling is threadedly connected to the end wall 110 of the mixing device 34. Another end wall 112 of the mixing device is axially spaced from the end wall 110 by means of a tubular member 114 to which both end walls are threadedly connected. A threaded fitting 116 and coupling 118 interconnect the mixing device with the inhale tube 20. A tubular housing 120 is held axially assembled between the end walls 110 and 112 and is provided with a mounting base 122 for the mixing device. The housing 120 encloses an annular mixing chamber 124about the tubular member 114. The tubular member is provided with a flow blocking element 126 intermediate the axial ends thereof within the housing 120 so as to cause a diverting of flow into the mixing chamber 124 through apertures 128 and 130 formed in the tubular member on opposite sides of the blockingelement 126. The di-- verted flow of oxygen gas is baffled bymeans of a tubular screen element 132 supported on the tubular member between the end wall members by means of collars 134 abutting the end wall members and fixed to the tubular screen member. Annular seal elements 136 are also positioned between the axial ends of the housing 120 and the end wall members and 112 in order to effectively seal the mixing chamber l24.within which the oxygen gas and the liquid 106 are mixed and baffled before being conducted to the face mask through the inhale tube 20.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. In combination with a source of gas under pressure, and a face mask to which inhale and exhale conduits are connected, means for controlling the supply of said gas to the inhale conduit and exhaust from the exhale conduit, comprising a tubular member to which the inhale conduit is connected, an elongated housing through which the tubular member extends, flow blocking means mounted within the tubular member for diverting flow through a mixing chamber enclosed by the housing about the tubular member, baffling means mounted on the tubular member within the housing through which said diverted flow is conducted, inlet means connected to the tubular member for conducting said gas to said mixing chamber, metering means interconnecting the source of gas with the inlet means, motor means drivingly connected to the metering means for controlling the rate of inflow of the gas to the inlet means, a reservoir of liquid, valve means connecting the reservoir to the inlet means for regulating flow of the liquid into the gas flowing through the inlet means, and means connecting the exhale conduit to the metering means for synchronizing exhaust flow with the inflow of gas.

2. The combination of claim 1 wherein said metering means includes an annular casing, a pair of control discs rotationally fixed to the casing and having at least two pairs of radially spaced and axially aligned ports, a rotor axially spacing said discs having circumferentially spaced apertures intermittently aligned with said ports in the control discs, means connecting the rotor to the motor for continuous rotation of the rotor at a flow rate determining speed, means connecting the source of gas and the inlet means respectively to one pair of the aligned ports in the control discs, and means connecting one of the ports of the other pair of aligned ports to the exhale conduit for synchronizing exhaust flow with the inflow of gas.

3. The combination of claim l'wherein said baffling means comprises a tubular screen element supported by the tubular member on opposite axial sides of the flow blocking means.

4. In combination with a source of gas under pressure, and a face mask to which inhale and exhale conduits are connected means for controlling the supply of said gas to the inhale conduit and exhaust from the exhale conduit, comprising mixing means connected to the inhale conduit through which the gas is conducted to the face mask and metering means connecting the source of gas to the mixing means including an electric motor, an annular casing, a pair of control discs rotationally fixed to the casing and having at least two pairs of radially spaced and axially aligned ports, a rotor axiconduit for synchronizing exhaust flow with the inflow of gas.

5. The combination of claim 4 including a reservoir of liquid and valve means connecting the reservoir between the mixing means and the metering means for proportioning the liquid and the gas mixed in the mixing means.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2785768 *Mar 29, 1952Mar 19, 1957Gauchard FernandApparatus for producing liquid suspensions for use as aerosols
US3207312 *Aug 5, 1960Sep 21, 1965Donald G GriswoldAutomatic control system for single tank sand filter
US3237644 *Sep 7, 1962Mar 1, 1966Robertshaw Controls CoRotary valving mechanism
US3291122 *Oct 24, 1963Dec 13, 1966Daniel Engstrom Carl-GunnarRespirator with nebulizer
US3507297 *Jun 23, 1964Apr 21, 1970Dann Norman PArtificial respiration apparatus
GB683694A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3983869 *Aug 13, 1974Oct 5, 1976Katumi SuzukiHumidifier for aqualung equipment
US4106503 *Mar 11, 1977Aug 15, 1978Richard R. RosenthalMetering system for stimulating bronchial spasm
US4171697 *Oct 12, 1977Oct 23, 1979Arion Henri GRespirator
US4189897 *Nov 1, 1978Feb 26, 1980Acraloc CorporationHigh speed evacuation chamber packaging and clipping machine
US5411059 *Feb 1, 1994May 2, 1995Essex Industries, Inc.Multiple flow rate fluid control valve assembly
US8006382Sep 17, 2007Aug 30, 2011Sp Medical LlcMethod of manufacturing flow selector disk for fluid pressure regulator
US8555913 *Nov 14, 2006Oct 15, 2013Amvex CorporationFluid fitting with integrated fluid management device
WO1997011734A1 *Sep 27, 1996Apr 3, 1997Nellcor Puritan Bennett IncOxygen-conserving regulator assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification128/203.19, 128/205.24, 137/625.21
International ClassificationA61M16/16, A61M16/10, A61M16/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M16/00, A61M16/16
European ClassificationA61M16/16, A61M16/00