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Publication numberUS3814094 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 4, 1974
Filing dateApr 3, 1972
Priority dateApr 3, 1972
Publication numberUS 3814094 A, US 3814094A, US-A-3814094, US3814094 A, US3814094A
InventorsAngelis A De, A Laliberte
Original AssigneeOmnitech Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Low profile cold weather respirator
US 3814094 A
Abstract
A low profile cold weather respirator in which a body of heat conductive foraminous material adapted to be supported over either the nose or mouth or both of the wearer is encased in an envelope adapted to be held on the wearer's head by a strap or the like and is adapted to form a seal with the wearer's face so that inhaled air is drawn into the cup through the envelope and into heat exchange relationship with the heat conductive material as it enters the space enclosed by the respirator and so that exhaled breath passes outwardly through the heat conductive material.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 De Angelis et a]. June 4, 1974 [541 Low PROFILE cou) WEATHER 3,603,315 9/1971 Becker 128/1462 RESPIRATOR FOREIGN PATENTS 0R APPLICATIONS [75] inventors: Armand De Angelis, Southbridge, 912,659 5/1954 Germany 128/1462 Mass; Albert J. Laliberte, South 416,409 9/1934 Great Britain 128/1466 Woodstock, Conn. 1,142 1/1904 Great Britain 128/146.6 [73] Assignee: Omnitech lnc., Southbridge, Mass. Primary Examiner Richard A Gaudet [22] Filed: Apr. 3, 1972 Assistant ExaminerLee S. Cohen [21 1 p No 240 Attorney, Agent, or FirmShenier & O'Connor [57] ABSTRACT n u v I I i I u p i v v u A a n n 4 s n e I v v 1 r u v [58] Field of Search 128/212, 208, 205, 146.2,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 603,021 4/1898 Dight 128/212 702,481 6/1902 Reid 128/1421) 2,201,315 5/1940 Lehhberg 128/1466 3,170,461 2/1965 Watts, Jr 128/1462 3,326,214 6/1967 McCoy 128/212 3,491,754 l/l970 Weese 128/212 supported over either the nose or mouth or both of the wearer is encased in an envelope adapted to be held on the wearers head by a strap or the like and is adapted to form a seal with the wearers face so that inhaled air is drawn into the cup through the envelope and into heat exchange relationship with the heat conductive material as it enters the space enclosed by the respirator and so that exhaled breath passes outwardly through the heat conductive material.

8 4 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures 1 LOW PROFILE COLD WEATHER RESPIRATOR BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Under extremely cold conditions inhalation of air causes great discomfort and may even cause injury to the mucous membranes and lungs. Efforts have been made in the prior art to overcome this problem. For example, apparatus has been designed to direct inhaled air over an electrically energized heat element or the like before it is drawn into the mouth. It has also been proposed that incoming air be brought into heat exchange relationship with a heat exchanger heated by exhaled carbon dioxide.

Devices of the prior art designed to overcome the problems inherent in cold weather respiration embody a number of defects. Some of them require a source of electrical energy for a heater or the like. All of them are cumbersome in use. They are complicated in construction, heavy and expensive to make.

We have invented a low profile cold weather respirator which overcomes the defects pointed out hereinabove of cold-weather breathing apparatus of the prior art. Our respirator does not require a source of energy such as a battery. It is comfortable in use and not cumbersome. It is simple in construction and in operation. It is light. It is inexpensive to manufacture for the result achieved thereby.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION One object of our invention is to provide a low profile cold weather respirator which overcomes the defects of cold weather breathing apparatus of the prior art.

Another object of our invention is to provide a low profile cold weather respirator which permits the user to breathe without discomfort or harm even under conditions of extreme cold.

A further object of our invention isto provide a low profile cold weather respirator which is comfortable in use and not cumbersome.

A still further object of our invention is to provide a low profile cold weather respirator which is lightweight.

Still another object of our invention is to provide a low profile cold weather respirator which is inexpensive to manufacture.

Other and further objects of our invention will ap pear in the following description.

In general our invention contemplates the provision of a low profile cold weather respirator in which foraminous heat conductive material is enclosed in an envelope of material adapted to be held over the wearers nose and mouth. so as to cause cold air being drawn into the cup to pass into heat exchange relationship with the conductive material which is heated by exhaled breath. Preferably our respirator is so constructed as to cause incoming air to travel along a tortuous path through the forminous material.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the accompanying drawings which form part of the instant specification and which are to be read in conjunction therewith and in which like reference numerals are used to indicate like parts in the various views:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of one form of our low profile cold weather respirator.

FIG. 2 is a sectional view of the form of our low profile cold weather respirator shown in FIG. 1 taken along the line2-2 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a sectional view of our low profile cold weather respirator taken along the line 3--l of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a front perspective view of a preferred embodiment of our low profile cold weather respirator.

FIG. 5 is a rear perspective view of the form of our cold weather'respirator illustrated in FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 is a sectional view of the form of our cold weather respirator illustrated in FIG. 4 and taken along the line 6-6 thereof.

FIG. 7 is a sectional view of a further form of our cold weather respirator.

FIG. 8 is a front elevation of yet another form of our cold weather respirator.

FIG. 9 is a sectional view of the form of our respirator shown in FIG. 8, taken along the line 9-9 of FIG. 8.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT erally by the reference character 10, includes a body.

indicated generally by the reference character 12, of foraminous heat conductive material. The body 12, for example, may be made up of a plurality of layers 14, I6 and 18 of aluminum screening or the like. In forming the body 12, the screening making up the layers l4, l6 and 18 is cut and bent as necessary to form a cup-like shape adapted to fit over the nose and mouth of the wearer.

In the form of our respirator shown in FIGS. I and 2, we enclose the body 12 in an envelope made up of inner and outer layers or shells 20 and 22 of any suitable material which relatively readily permits the passage of air therethrough while offering some resistance to the passage of moisture therethrough. For example,

the layers 20 and 22 may be formed from a relatively thin sheet of foamed natural or synthetic rubber. Each of the shells is cut and formed to the general configuration of body 12 so that shell 20 fits within the body and shell 22 fits over the outside of the body. The edges of the two layers 20 and 22 extend somewhat beyond the edges of the body 12. The facing surfaces of the layers 20 and 22 adjacent to the peripheries thereof are secured together by any suitable means such as by an adhesive, so that the periphery of the respirator 10 forms a seal with the wearers face when it is applied to the wearers head in a manner to be described.

We employ any suitable means known to the art for holding the respirator 10 on the wearers head and over his nose and mouth. For example, we may apply male snap elements 24 to the layers 20 and 22 adjacent the peripheries thereof at suitable locations around the edge of the respirator 10. Each of a pair of strap elements 26 and 28 carries a female snap element 30 adapted to receive an element 24 detachably to hold the strap 26 or 28 in place. The ends of the two straps 26 and 28 may be received in a buckle 32 to permit adjustment of the effective length of the band formed by the two straps. We may make the straps from any suitable material such, for example, as rubber strip. If desired, we may place more than one element 24 on each side of the mask so as to permit some adjustment of the positions at which the straps 26 and 28 are attached to the respirator.

Referring now to FIGS. 4 to 6, an alternate formof our respirator, indicated generally by the reference character 34 includes a body, indicated generally by the reference character 36 which is of substantially the same construction as is the body 12. That is, it is made up of foraminous heat conductive material so formed as to provide a cup-like shape adapted to enclose a space around the wearers nose and mouth when the respirator is in use. The material of which the body 36 is made has sufficient structural strength to maintain its shape in normal use.

In the form of our mask illustrated in FIGS. 4 to 6, we may first enclose the body 36 in an envelope including inner and outer layers or shells 38 and 40 of a material which is the same as that of which the layers and 22 are formed. Moreover, shells 38 and 40 are adhered around their outer edges in the same manner as are shells 20 and 22. In the form of our mask illustrated in FIGS. 4 to 6 we cause the incoming air to travel a tortuous path as it moves into the space enclosed by the respirator. In order to achieve this result, we may apply a first piece 42 of material relatively impervious to air over the front of the layer 40 by any suitable means such as by an adhesive or the like. Moreover, we apply a strip 44 to the layer 38 around the inside of the wall of the respirator. The strip 44, like the layer 42, is relatively impervious to the passage of air. It may be adhered to the layer 38 by any suitable means such as by an adhesive. Each of the layer 42 and'strip 44 may, for example, be formed from a relatively dense felt or tightly woven fabric. As will be explained more fully hereinbelow, the form of our respirator shown in FIGS. 4 to 6 forces entering air to travel a tortuous path as it moves into the respirator chamber so as to ensure good heat exchange with the material of body 36.

Referring now to FIG. 7, yet another form of our respirator, indicated generally by the reference character 46, includes a body 48 which is substantially the same as are bodies 12 and 36. In this form of the invention, however, an envelope, indicated generally by the reference character 50 is formed from inner and outer shells 52 and 54 of a material which is inherently substantially impervious to the passage of air. The layers 52 and 54 are joined around the peripheries thereof by any suitable means. In this form of our invention, we provide the side of the outer layer with a plurality of perforations 56 for admitting air into the envelope 50 around the side thereof. Similarly, we form the central portion of the inner layer 52 with perforations 58 for admitting air into the space enclosed by the respirator;

While we have, in connection with the showings of FIGS. 4 to 7, described arrangements in which the side of the outer envelope layer permits the passage of air therethrough and the central portion does not readily permit the passage of air, andan inner envelope layer in which the central portion permits the passage of air while the side wall does not, we might as well reverse the arrangement, permitting air to pass only through the central portion of the outer layer and only through the side portion of the inner layer. Alternatively, we may form the central portion of each layer from a different material than that of the side thereof soas to give us the required differential air permeability to achieve the desired result.

All of the forms of our respirator described thus far are adapted to be worn over both the nose and the mouth of the user. Some individuals suffer from disabilities which cause their physicans to instruct them to breathe only through the mouth. Referring to FIGS. 9 and 10 we have shown a form of our respirator intended for use by such a person. This respirator, indicated generally by the reference character 60, is made up of an outer shell or housing 62 and an inner shell or cover secured to a peripheral flange 66 around the outer shell 62 by any suitable means such as an adhesive. We make the members 62 and 64 from any suitable material such, for example, as a relatively rigid plastic. Members 62 and 64 house a plurality of layers of foraminous heat conductive material such as aluminum screening making up a body 68. Openings 70 and 72 in the sides of the shell 62 permit air and breath to pass into and out of the space enclosed by the shells 62 and 64. Holes 74 in the inner shell 64 permit air and breath to pass through the shell. As is the case with the forms of our invention shown in FIGS. 4 to 7 air is thus forced into good heat exchange relationship with the material making up body 68. Preferably we adhere or otherwise attach a seal 76 of foam rubber strip or the like around the inner periphery of the mask 60. A strap 78 permits the mask to be held on the head.

In use of the form of our low profile respirator illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2, the respirator is placed over the wearers nose and mouth and the band formed by straps 26 and 28 is drawn over the back of the wearers head soas effectively to hold the respirator in position. As the user exhales, the heat of his breath heats the heat conductive body 12. Moreover, a certain amount of moisture is trapped within the space formed by the respirator. As he exhales, cold air is brought into heat exchange relationship with the body 12 so as to be heated thereby. It is conditioned by the moisture within the respirator.

In use of the forms of our respirator illustrated in FIGS. 4 to 9, air being drawn into the respirator is forced to pass through the wall of the envelope outer layer and along a tortuous path through the body 36 or 48 and into the respirator through the central airpermeable portion of the inner envelopelayer. The arrange'ment-can be reversed, so that incoming air passes through the central portion to the outer-envelope layer and through the wall of the inner envelope layer. The action of this form of our invention in heating and conditioning incoming air is substantially the same as that of the form of our invention shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. The heat exchange, however, is more efficient.

It will be seen that we have accomplished the objects of our invention. We have provided a cold weather respirator which overcomes the disadvantages of cold weather breathing apparatus of the prior art. Our respirator does not require an energy source. It is convenient to use and not cumbersome. It is lightwieght. It is simple in construction and is relatively inexpensive to manufacture.

It will be understood that certain features and subcombinations are of utility and may be employed without reference to other features and subcombinations. This is contemplated by and is within'the scope of our claims. It is further obviousthat various changes may be made in details within the scope of our claims without departing from the spirit of our invention. It is, therefore, to be understood that our invention is not to be limited to the specific details shown and described.

Having thus described our invention, what we claim l. A cold weather respirator for assisting a wearer in breathing in a cold atmosphere including in combination, a foraminous body of thermally conductive material, said body having a cup-like configuration providing a central portion and a peripheral portion, said body adapted to extend over and to cover the nose and mouth of a wearer when said respirator is in position on the wearers head, an envelope covering said body, said envelope comprising an inner panel conforming to the shape of the inside of said body and an outer panel conforming to the shape of the outside of said body, one of said panels being bidirectionally pervious to the passage of air over the peripheral portion of said body and impervious to the passage of air over the central portion of said body, the other of said panels being bidirectionally pervious to the passage of air over the central portion of said body and impervious to the passage of air over theperipheral portion of said body to cause inhaled air to travel in heat exchange relationship with said body along a path between said pervious portions and to cause exhaled breath to travel in heat exchange relationship with said body along a path between said pervious portions, and means for holding said body on the wearers head with the body covering the nose and mouth of the wearer.

2. A cold weather respirator as in claim 1 in which said thermally conductive material is metal screening.

thereof.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4441494 *Mar 2, 1981Apr 10, 1984Montalbano AnthonyCold weather breathing device
US4458679 *Jun 1, 1982Jul 10, 1984Ward Russell GCold weather respiratory mask
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Classifications
U.S. Classification128/201.13
International ClassificationA61M16/10
Cooperative ClassificationA61M16/1045
European ClassificationA61M16/10E
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 23, 1987AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: GENTEX CORPORATION, CARBONDALE, PA. A CORP. OF DE.
Owner name: OMNITECH INC.,
Effective date: 19870317
Mar 23, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: GENTEX CORPORATION, CARBONDALE, PA. A CORP. OF DE.
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:OMNITECH INC.,;REEL/FRAME:004700/0297
Effective date: 19870317
Owner name: GENTEX CORPORATION, A CORP. OF DE.,PENNSYLVANIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:OMNITECH INC.,;REEL/FRAME:004700/0297