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Publication numberUS3814115 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 4, 1974
Filing dateFeb 20, 1973
Priority dateFeb 23, 1972
Also published asDE2308775A1
Publication numberUS 3814115 A, US 3814115A, US-A-3814115, US3814115 A, US3814115A
InventorsVan Acker J
Original AssigneeVan Acker J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coin dispensing apparatus
US 3814115 A
Abstract
A coin dispenser for use in coin operated apparatus is described in which coins can be controllably dispensed one at a time from a coin stack in a coin tube and, alternatively, the entire contents of the coin tube can be readily discharged.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 194/80; 221/91; l94/DIG. 14

Van Acker June 4, 1974 COIN DISPENSING APPARATUS [56] References Cited [76] Inventor: Joseph Edward Van Acker, UNITED STATES PATENTS Pleasantville Rd., New Vernon, NJ. 2,491,573 12/1949 McPherson l33/5 R 07976 3,180,343 4/1965 Gecewicz [33/8 R X [22] Filed: 1973 Primary ExarizinerStanley H. Tollberg [21] Appl. No.2 333,546 Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Davis, Hoxie, Faithful &

Hapgood [30] Forelgn Appllcatlon Prlorlty Data ABSTRACT Feb. 23, 1972 Great Britain 8386/72 1 Feb. 15, 1973 South Africa 73/1072 A dlspfanser m Com operated apparatus ls W descnbed 1n whlch coms can be controllably dispensed one at a time from a coin stack in a coin tube rand, alternatively. the entire contents of the Coin tube 581 Field of Search 133/5, 4, 23; 194/10, 2, be read'ly dscharged- 8 CIaims, 10 Drawing Figures PATENTEDJUN 41974 SHEET 2 BF 2 Midi/[4 I I A FIGJO FIG.7

1 COIN DISPENSING APPARATUS The present invention is concerned with coin and token dispensing apparatus suitable for incorporation in coin operated vending mechines, change makers and other machines which dispense coins or tokens. For example, such vending machines conventionally incorporate coinselector apparatus which receives coins of various denominations, determines thedenomination and authenticity of the coins, rejects slugs and coins of unacceptable denomination, determines and sums the denominations of acceptable coins, produces a vend signal when acceptable coins equaling or exceeding in value the price of the item to be vended have been inserted, and produces change in an amount equal to the selected. The coin selector apparatus is usually housed within a case whose external demensions and coin box passages for input, reject and change-giving conform to standards which have evolved in the vending machine suitable for operation in connection with the present invention; however, the present invention is applicable to coin dispensing in other apparatus and methods as well.

In a coin dispenser of the present invention, a structure, such as the coin tubes, stores a supply of coins segregated by denomination for change-giving purposes. The coin tubes are dimensioned to hold enough coins for anticipated change-giving purposes, and may be arranged to be replenished by coins of the appropriatedenomination from coin sorter apparatus, such as that disclosed in the last above-mentioned application. When coinage exceeding the price of the desired item is inserted, the difference from the price is determined by the circuitry and change dispenser mechanisms at the foot of the coin tubes are actuated to dispense the proper change.

In the drawings FIG. 1 is an elevation of an embodiment of the apparatus of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a downward sectional view taken along the line 11-11 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3is a partial upward sectional view along the line 111-111 of FIG. 1'; and I FIG. 4 is a partial sectional view along the line IV,-1V of FIG. 3. 7

FIG. 5 is a front view of a second embodiment of the apparatus of the present invention;

FIG. 6 is a sideelevation of theapparatus of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 a bottom view of the apparatus of FIGS. 5 and 6;

FIGS. 8 and 9 are top views of two dump slides utilized in the apparatus of FIGS. 5, 6 and 7; and r FIG. 10 is an end view of the dump slide of FIG. 9.

The figures of this'specification are not scale representations.

' A change dispenser assembly indicated generally at excess of the inserted coinage over the price of the item 50 in FIG. 1 is located at the bottom of the apparatus at the foot of thecoin tube 36 and another coin tube (not shown) for the small and intermediate diameter coins, respectively. The coin dispenser 50 will be described with respect to coin tube 36 only, the apparatus associated with each coin tube being similar. Referring now to FIGS. 1, 2 and 4, the change dispenser includes an upper plate 51, which supports the coin tube 36 and which has an opening concentric with the bottom of each coin tube. Mounted on the rear wall of the case 6 is an actuator, such as a solenoid 60. The solenoid 60 has an axially movable armature 61 which is linked to a bell crank 62. When the armature is pulled in by applying power to' the coil of the solenoid 60, the bell crank 62 is caused to push forward against a coin pusher 63. When the solenoid 60 is not energized, a spring 65 retracts the coin pusher 63 away from the coin tube 36, so that the curved forward end 64 of the coin pusher 63 is withdrawn from the region concentric with coin tube 36. The spring 65 also causes the forward end 64 of the coin pusher 63 to, bear upwardly against the underside of upper plate 51, when the coin pusher is in this retracted position. Beneath the upper plate is a laterally movable slide 53 and a supporting lower plate 52. The slide 53 has a coin aperture 54 approximately equal in diameter to the associated coin. The aperture 54 is normally positioned out of alignment with and forward of coin tube 36 by force provided by springs 55 and 56 which cause the front edge of the slide 53 to bear against a stop, in this case integral with the lower plate. When the solenoid is activated the pusher 63 pushes the edge of the bottom coin from coin tube 36 across the top surface of the slide 53 to the aperture 54, through which the coin then falls to be directed to the user as change.

There is a groove 58 in the upper surface of the slide 53 of sufficient width and depth to receive the pusher 63 so that whenthe pusher 63 is pushed downward into the groove 58 it is no longer exposed above the coin bearing upper surface of the slide 53. As the pusher 63 completes pushing the bottom coin to the aperture 54,

the support of that coin for all of the coins above it in the coin tube 36 is removed, and the full weight of those coins bear on the pusher 63, pushing it down into the groove 58 in the slide 53 where it is free to return to its inactivated position under the force of the spring 65. Once the pusher 63 moves into the groove 58, the next coin in the, coin tube 36 bears on the upper surface of the slide 53 and is in position to be dispensed. When the pusher 63 reaches the inactivated position, the front edge 64 pops up from under the coins and bears against the underside of the upper plate 51 to assume its initial inactivated position. There is a spherical depression 57 in the upper surface of slide 53, having a radius of approximately the radius of the coin. This depression removes the side wall of groove 58 concentric with the bottom of the coin tube 36 when slide 53 is in the forward position. This depression tends to prevent a first coin from standing obliquely on edge at the bottom of the coin tube 36, thereby preventing a coin jam in the tube.

7 Means to reduce the likihood of. a coin being dislodged from the coin tube 36 and inadvertently dispensed by shock, vibration and the like are shown in FIGS. 3 and 4. A pair of small, freely moving weights, such as steel balls 66 and 68 are located in holes 67 and 69 respectively in upper plate 51, below the lower end of the coin tube 36 and approximately tangential to the inner surface of the coin tube 36. The holes 67 and 69 each have a conical convergent section at the bottom to prevent the balls 66 and 68 from falling out. A small portion of the balls 66 and 68 protrudes below the surface of the upper plate 51 into the region 59 in which a coin must move to pass from the coin tube 36 forward to the normal position of aperture 54. The balls are upin holes 67 and 69 a few thousandths of an inch larger in diameter. The holes were located symmetrically three-fourths inch apart and 0.330 inch from the center of the coin tube 36. The conical convergent section of the holes was tapered at approximately 32 to the axis of the holes. The balls 66 and 68 penetrated approximately 0.030 inch into the region through which coins pass enroute to aperture 54.

1n the event that the serviceman or person collecting the coins accepted by the coin selector wishes to rap idly empty the coin tube 36, he-need merely push a rod, screwdriver or the like through the hole 70 in the front wall of the lower plate 52, pushing the slide 53 back against its springs'55 and 56 until the aperture 54 is concentric with the coin tube 36, When the pushing tool is removed, the slide 53 is returned toits normal position by the springs 55 and 56.

A detector.7l, such as a sensitive electrical switch having an activating arm 72 projecting into the base of the coin tube 36, may be used to detect when the coin tube is empty, to cause appropriate logic circuitry to indicate that no change is available and to activate alternative change arrangements.

A second embodiment of a change dispenser assembly indicated generally at 150 in FIG. 5, is located at the bottom of the coin apparatus at the foot of the'coin tubes 136 and 236 for the intermediate and small diameter coins respectively. Referring now to FIGS. 5 through 10, the" change dispenser 150 includes a base 151 which may be a single piece molding comprising a shaped bottom piece and the lower portions 152 and 252 of the coin tubes 136 and 236. Adjacent each of the coin tubes is an actuator, such as solenoids 160 and 260. When each solenoid 160 and 260 is not energized, springs 165 and 265 retract the coin dispenser slides 163 and 263 into alignment with the coin tubes 136 and 236, to receive a coin from the tube in the forward apertures 164 and 264 of the slides 163 and 263. Mounted on the rear wall of the case 106 are two solenoids 160 and 260. The solenoids. l60 and 260 each have an axially movable armature 161 and 261 which is linked to a bell crank 162 and 262. When an armature is pulled in by applying power to the coil of the solenoid 160 or 260, the bell crank 162 or 262 is caused to push forward a coin dispenser slide 163 or 263, moving the coin forward until it can fall through the for- As shown in FlGS. 7 and 8, the dump slide 153 for intermediate size coins has a coin aperture 154 approximately equal in diameter to the associated coin. The aperture 154 is normally positioned out of alignment with and forward of coin tube 136 by force provided by spring 155 which pulls on pin 157 embedded in the slide 153, causing the rear edge of the slide 153 to bear against a stop or the back wall of the case 106. When the solenoid is activated the coin dispenser slide 163 pushes the bottom; coin from coin tube 136 across the top surface of the slide 153 to the aperture 154, through which the coin then falls to be directed to the user as change. The dump slide 253, shown in greater detail in FIGS. 9 and 10, for the smallest size coins includ'es a 30 wedge obstructing one side of the aperture 254, which deflects dispensed coins in a desired direction to satisfy the coin receiving location requirements of apparatus (not shown) utilized with the dispenser In, the event that the seviceman or person collecting the coins from the coin dispenser 150 of this embodiment, wishes to rapidly empty a coin tube 136 or 236, he need merely engage the forward aperture 154 or 254 of the respective dump slide 153 or 253, for'exam-- ple with a finger, pulling it forward against its spring or 255 until the rear aperture 156 or 256 is concentric with the coin tube 136 or 236. When the dump slide 153 or 253 is released, it is returned toits normal positon by the spring 155 or 255.

' Detector coils 171 and 271, for example, thirty turns of bifilar wound 31 gauge copper wire, may be used to detect when the coin tube is empty. In connection with appropriate logic circuitry they indicate that no changeis available and activate alternative change arrangements. 1n the dispenser 150 of this embodiment, the detector 271 for the smallest size but higher valued coin (such as US. l0-cent coins) is located so as to detect the presence or absence of the very last coin, and the logic circuitry is arranged to cause the dispenser 150 to dispense only the other denomination coin, whereas the detector 171 for the lowest valued coin in use by the dispenser (such as the US. 5-cent coin) is located so that it will detect the top coin of the smallest number of coins equaling the value of the maximum'amount of change which is to be dispensed, so that the logic circuit can provide an indication that insufficient change is available before the last coin is despensed from tube 136, avoiding the problem of dispensing only part, of the required change.

While the specific descriptions of foregoing embodiments have been included references to coin tubes, solenoids and the dispensing of one coin at a time, it should be clear that other coin stack retaining structures and actuators can be employed and that, if desired, by appropriate dimensioning of the coin dispensing elements, more than onecoin at a time can be dispensed from a single stack. Similarly, if desired, the apparatus can be arranged so'that coins are dispensed upon the return stroke of the actuator, in which case it maybe necessary to move the coin pusher 63 or dispense slide 163 or 263 from a position obscuring its reward aperture 154 or 254 of the coin tube dump slides v 153 and 253 respectively.

spective coin tube in the coin tube dumping procedure.

What 1 claim is: t

1. A coin dispenser for dispensing a predetermined number of coins comprising: means for storing a plurality of coins in a stacked face-to-face relationship;

means at one end of the storage means responsive to actuation for-moving a predetermined number of coins from the storage means to a dispensing aperture; means for actuating the coin moving means; and blocking means for preventing the escape of coins in addition to the predetermined number of coins from the storage means, the blocking means including the dispensing aperture, the dispensing aperture in the blocking means being normally positioned out of alignment with the storage means, and the blocking means being movable to bring the dispensing aperture into alignment with the storage means to permit the coin stack to escape from the storage means.

2. The coin dispenser of claim 1 wherein the thickness of the coin mover means defines the predetermined number ofcoins despensed each time the coin mover means is actuated.

3. The coin dispenser of claim 2 wherein the coin mover means comprises a longitudinally movable element having a coin engaging edge.

4. The coin dispenser of claim 3, wherein the blocking means comprises a longitudinally movable member parallel to the coin mover means.

5. The coin dispenser of claim 1 wherein the blocking means is spring-biased into blocking position.

6. The coin dispenser of claim 4 wherein the blocking means is spring-biased into blocking position.

7. The coin dispenser of claim 1 wherein the blocking means has a second aperture and is movable to a position in which the second aperture aligns with the coin stack. V

8. The coin dispenser of claim 4 wherein the blocking means has a second aperture and is'movable to a position in which the second aperture aligns with the coin stack.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2491573 *Jul 16, 1947Dec 20, 1949Mcpherson Clarence CCoin dispensing mechanism
US3180343 *May 22, 1961Apr 27, 1965Reed Electromech CorpCoin dispensing device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3935873 *Jul 19, 1974Feb 3, 1976U.M.C. Industries, Inc.Coin-dispensing device
US4266564 *Oct 1, 1979May 12, 1981Orin W. CoburnCoin release assembly
US5460568 *May 10, 1993Oct 24, 1995Kabushiki Kaisha Nippon ConluxCoin processor
US5566807 *Mar 3, 1995Oct 22, 1996Mars IncorporatedCoin acceptance method and apparatus
US6540601Feb 9, 2001Apr 1, 2003Mag-Nif IncorporatedCash box with coin sorter
US6554692Feb 9, 2001Apr 29, 2003Mag-Nif IncorporatedCoin sorting and amusement device
US6585581Feb 9, 2001Jul 1, 2003Mag-Nif IncorporatedCoin sorting apparatus with reciprocating coin pushing member
US7014554Mar 3, 2000Mar 21, 2006Mars IncorporatedAdaptable coin mechanism
USRE33314 *Jul 7, 1987Aug 28, 1990Mars IncorporatedVending machine power switching apparatus
EP1045351A2Apr 6, 2000Oct 18, 2000Mars IncorporatedMoney handling mechanism with peripheral port
EP1168256A2Jul 1, 1998Jan 2, 2002Mars IncorporatedMethod of operating a coin mechanism
Classifications
U.S. Classification453/41
International ClassificationG07D1/00, G07F5/00, G07F5/24
Cooperative ClassificationG07F5/24
European ClassificationG07F5/24