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Publication numberUS3814371 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 4, 1974
Filing dateOct 27, 1972
Priority dateOct 27, 1972
Publication numberUS 3814371 A, US 3814371A, US-A-3814371, US3814371 A, US3814371A
InventorsLocricchio J
Original AssigneeIndusco Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Structural network for making composite concrete tiers
US 3814371 A
Abstract
A combination concrete pouring form and concrete reinforcing network and a method of using the network for building reinforced tiered concrete structures, such as amphitheaters, stadiums, stairs and the like. The reinforcing network includes a plurality of longitudinally extending reinforcing elements, each having an upstanding sheet metal web provided with a saw-tooth pattern assembled from a series of triangular sections which serve to accurately locate the treads and risers of the tiered structure and additionally provide reinforcement and a control against the propagation of cracks through the final structure.
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United States Patent 1 1 1 1 3,814,371

Locricchio 1 June 4, 1974 [54] STRUCTURAL NETWORK FOR MAKING 3.055.146 9/1962 1.0mm 249/14 x COMPOSITE CONCRETE '"ERS 3.331.579 7/[967 Petersen .7 249/l4 [75] Inventor: Joseph J. Locricchio, Bloomfield Prima EraminerCharles w Lanham Mlch' Assismiit E.taminerCarl E. Hall [73] Assignee: Indusco Corporation, Troy, Mich. Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Harness, Dickey & Pierce [22] Filed: Oct. 27, 1972 [21 Appl. No.: 301,432 [57] ABSTRACT A combination concrete pouring form and concrete forcing network and a method of using the net- 521 US. Cl 249/14, 52/182, 249/85, rem

249/91, 249/207, 264/35 :vork for blJllClmg relnforcedtlered concrete struc. ures, such as amphltheaters. stad1ums, sta1rs and the [51] Int. Cl B28b 7/22 like The reinforcing network includes a plurality of [58] Field of Search 249/9 longitudinally extending reinforcing elements each 249/97 207; 264/31 35; 52/6 191 having an upstanding sheet metal web provided with a saw-tooth pattern assembled from a series of triangu- [56] References Cited lar sections which serve to accurately locate the treads UNITED STATES PATENTS and risers of the tiered structure and additionally pro- 1,525.441 2/1925 Donaldson 52/191 vide reinforcement and a control against the propagal,8l9.9l6 8/l93l Murphy 249/]4 {ion of cracks through the final 5truc[ure 2,052,446 8/1936 Cannon 1 249/l4 2,489,604 11/1949 Woods 249/14 7 6 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures STRUCTURAL NETWORK FOR MAKING COMPOSITE CONCRETE TIERS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In accordance with prior art practices, it is conventional, except in comparatively simple structures, to hand-craft concrete forms from wood which are custom-built at the construction site for each pouring operation. Such prior art practices are not only costly and time consuming, but also have limitations as to the accuracy of the final poured concrete structure because of the difficulty of constructing such wooden forms at the construction site to precise dimensions. A great deal of time is also consumed in the construction of reinforced concrete structures during the positioning and attachment of metal reinforcing networks at appropriate locations within the forms in order to prevent any appreciable shifting thereof during the concrete pouring operation. It is also customary practice, after the concrete has cured sufficiently to enable a stripping of the forms therefrom, to saw-cut the slabs of concrete at spaced intervals to appreciable depths employing special tooling, which serves as a control against the propagation of the cracks through the composite concrete structure during its life.

The application of the foregoing prior art practices in the construction of concrete amphitheaters, stadiums and other tiered structures has contributed substantially to the high cost of such structures and the inordinate amount of time and labor required in their construction. The present invention overcomes the foregoing problems and disadvantages in providing a network which can readily be fabricated on mechanical equipment, producing assemblable components of a high degree of accuracy which thereafter can be transported to the job site and quickly and simply assembled there into a structural network which is extremely accurate. Portions of the network are adapted to become embedded within the concrete structure, thereby serving the dual function of reinforcing the final structure, as well as serving as a crack control against the propagation of any cracks that may subsequently develop in the structure during its life.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The benefits and advantages of the present invention are achieved by a combination concrete pouring form or mold and reinforcing network for building tiered concrete structures such as amphitheaters, stadiums and the like, and wherein the network includes a plurality of longitudinally extending reinforcing members which are adapted to be disposed in spaced side-by-side relationship and are mounted at an angle corresponding to the desired angle of ascent of the tiers. Each reinforcing member includes an upstanding sheet metal web formed with a saw-tooth configuration defining therebetween a series of upper edges corresponding to the plane of the treads of the tiers and a series of generally upright edges which define the planes of the risers of the tiers. The upright web of each reinforcing member is formed from a series of assemblable triangularshaped sections, each incorporating aligning means thereon for assembling the sections in accurate relationship and further including supporting means for engaging and supporting concrete reinforcing rods which extend between adjacent reinforcing members. Suitable mounting means are provided along the riser edges of each of the webs to which a riser panel can be re- .movably secured during the pouring and subsequent solidification of the concrete. The upper edges of the upstanding web serves as screeds for enablingan accurate finishing of the treads of the tiered structure and also serve as the crack control elements in the completed structure.

Any number of the longitudinal reinforcing members can be employed of a desired length and arranged in a desired pattern to provide tiered concrete structures in which the tiers are curved, straight or combinations of straight sections and curved sections, providing thereby optimum versatility in the planning, layout and construction of concrete structures. The longitudinal reinforcing members can also be employed in an inverted position as braces with the riser edges of the webs thereof in supporting abutting contact against the riser panels providing for further rigidification of the network and preventing any appreciable movement thereof during the concrete pouring operation.

The present invention also contemplates an improved process for building reinforced tiered concrete structures employing the combination form and rein-,

forcing network, providing thereby structures which are accurate, of high strength and of comparatively low cost in comparison to similar structures built in accordance with prior building practices of the types heretofore known.

Additional advantages and benefits of the present invention will become apparent upon a reading of the description of the preferred embodiments, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. I is a fragmentary plan view of a reinforced concrete amphitheater showing a section of the reinforcing network in position prior to the pouring of concrete therein;

FIG. 2 is a magnified transverse sectional view of a portion of the reinforcing network as shown in FIG. 1 and taken substantially along the line 2-2 thereof;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged transverse vertical sectional view through the reinforcing member shown in FIG. 2 and taken substantially along the line 3-3 thereof;

FIG. 4 is a magnified fragmentary transverse sectional view of a different section of the reinforcing network shown in FIG. 1 and taken substantially along the line 4-4 thereof;

FIG. 5 is a transverse vertical sectional view through the brace member shown in FIG. 4 and taken substantially along the line 5-5 thereof;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary plan view of the reinforcing element shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary plan view illustrating the manner by which the triangular-shaped web sections are cut from a strip of sheet metal; and

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary transverse sectional view through a portion of the composite concrete amphitheater shown in FIG. 1 and taken substantially along the line 9-9 thereof.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now in detail to the drawings, and as may be best seen in FIG. 1, an amphitheater comprising a tiered arcuate concrete structure 10 and a centrally located stage 12 is shown which is typical of one of the numerous varieties of tiered structures that are feasible tive to a center point, indicated at C, at the center of the stage 12.

Only a section of the amphitheater is illustrated which may extend through any desired angularity including a complete circle in accordance with the particular terrain and desired function of the resultant structure. As willbecome apparent during the descripis preferred to provide for drainage of rain water as in the case of outdoor structures. The triangular shaped web section 30 is formed with a forward edge 36, which normally is oriented in a vertical direction upon assembly or at a slight angle to provide a desired kick-back and defines the plane of the riser of each step or tier. Preferably, each web section 30 is formed with a flange 38 disposed at substantially 90 1 to the major web section thereof to facilitate the attachment of riser panels or boards 40 to the forward edge of each web section. Each riser panel 40 extends in an arcuate manner between adjacent reinforcing members as best seen in tion, the tiered concrete structure can readily embody tiered sections in which the tiers extend in a'substantially straight direction such as may be desired along the straight side sections of an oval stadium for example. and which straight sections are joined at one or both ends by arcuate tiered sections, such as the section I0 shown in FIG. 1, thereby providing the desiredseating arrangement. Each tier may satisfactorily support one-or aplurality of rows of seats or benches removably or fixedly attached thereto in accordance with known practices. 3

In the exemplary embodiment shown in FIG. I, and as further illustrated in FIGS. 2, 3 and 6, the combination form or mold and reinforcing network for the arcuate concrete structure is comprised of a plurality of longitudinally extending reinforcing members 22 which, in the embodiment shown in FIG. 1, are arranged in a radially extending pattern at appropriate circumferentially spaced increments and extend between the front wall 14 and rear wall 16. Each reinforcing member 22 is comprised of a longitudinally extending stringer or angle iron member 24, including a base flange 26 and an upright flange 28, as best seen in FIG. 3, to which a plurality of generally triangular-shaped sections 30 are secured, forming an upright web having a generally saw-tooth shapedpattern. In the specific arrangement illustrated, each of the triangular-shaped web sections 30 are identical and are arranged at equal spaced increments along the angle iron member 24, whereby the tiers 20 are substantially of identical size and configuration.

In accordance with the preferred practice, the triangular-shaped web sections 30 are stamped or blanked from a strip of sheet metal 32, as shown in FIG. 7, in a manner so that substantially no scrap occurs and wherein each web section is of identical size and conwork willbe of extreme accuracy. The sheet metal 32 may be com prised of A inch galvanized steel or equivalent material and of sufficient strength consistent with structure and serves as a screed during the finishing operation of the poured concrete.

"The 'ab'perag'e 34 conventionally warranted in? substantially horizontal plane, as shown in FIG. 2, although a small angular incline toward the forward side FIG. 1. Each flange 38 is provided with a plurality of apertures 42, which can be conveniently punched in the webs at the time of their fabrication through which nails, indicated at 43 in FIG. 6, or other suitable fasteners can be driven for'securing the riser panels .39 t e q wa d tes is. of t flap ssflfi W Each triangular web shaped section is also provided with at least one aligning aperture 44 in the narrow tapered end section thereof and an aligning aperture 46 adjacent to the riser end section thereof, which are accurately located, whereby the sections can be accu-. rately assembled in overlapping relationship, as shown in FIG. 2, to define a saw-tooth upright web. A machine screw or bolt 48 can be employed for securing adjacent I web sections 30 to each other through the aligning apertures 44, 46. In addition to the aligning apertures, each web section is also preferably formed with two securing apertures 50 at opposite ends thereof, as best seen in FIG. 7, which enable the assembled sections to be securely fastened to the upstanding flange. 28 of the angle iron member 24 by means of a bolt 52, as may best be seen in FIG. 3. In the assembled condition, the

lower edge 54 of each of the web sections 30 extends along and is disposed in supporting relationship against the base flange 26 of the angle iron member which in turn extends at an angle relative to the horizontal so as j to provide the desired angle of ascent of the tiers.

Each of the triangularly shaped web sections 30 is also formed with one or more supporting apertures 56 v figuratiom'assuring that the resultant assembled netthrough which steel reinforcing rods 58 are adapted to extend and are supported by the reinforcing-members 22 at a positionspaced inwardly of the treads and risers of the tiers and become embedded within the concrete structure. The provision of the supporting apertures 56 dispenses with the prior art practice of employing separate means for treeing or otherwise supporting such reinforcing rods in appropriate position within the forms to prevent shifting thereof upon pouring of concrete into the form.

In accordance with the preferred practice of the present invention, the terrain at the construction site is'pre liminarily graded at a desired incline, such as indicated at 60 in FIGS. '2 and 4, which corresponds substantially to the angle of ascent of the tiers, thereby providing a substantially uniform thickness of concrete from the lower end to the upper end of the structure. The front I and rear retaining walls l4, 16, respectively, are next poured in place, whereafter a steel wire reinforcing mesh 62 is placed over substantially the entire area of the tiered structure. Next, an assembly of the reinforc ing members 22 is effected by securing the triangular shaped web sections 30 to each other and to the angle iron stringers by bolts 48 and 52 placed through the aligning apertures and securing apertures, respectively.

A further rigidification of the assembled structure can be achieved, if desired, by tack welding the assembly at spaced intervals therealong. Each assembled reinforcing member thereafter is placed in appropriate radially spaced relationship between the front and back walls and is supported in appropriate position above the terrain surface, such as by means of posts 64 as shown in FIG. 2, which are wired or tack welded to the reinforcing stringer and web.

After the assembled reinforcing members 22 are in appropriate position, the reinforcing rods 58 are placed through the supporting apertures 56 and riser panels or boards 40 are secured to the flanges 38, such as by means of the nails 43, as best seen in FIG. 6, which are driven from the inner side outwardly through the panels and thereafter are bent over, forming an interlock.

The combination concrete pouring form and reinforcing network is ready to be poured at this point, al-

though it is usually preferred, as best seen in FIGS. 1

and 4, to employ a plurality of braces 66 for supporting the riser panels 40 at positions intermediate of the reinforcing members 22. The braces 66, as best seen in FIGS. 4 and 5, merely comprise assembled reinforcing members turned end-for-end and disposed in inverted position. The braces 66 include angle iron stringers 24 and triangularly shaped web sections inverted such that the flanged portions 38 thereof are disposed outwardly and in supporting abutment against the outer faces of the riser panels 40. The lower edges 34' of the braces 66 are preferably spaced upwardly of the plane of the treads, indicated at 34 in FIG. 4, to provide clearance for the concrete finishing tools during the finishing of the poured concrete. The braces 66 can subsequently be employed, if desired, as reinforcing members 22 simply by an inversion thereof and turning them end for end, thereby still further enhancing the utility and flexibility of the disclosed reinforcing network.

After the reinforcing network is in place, the concrete is poured, preferably commencing at the upper end and progressing downwardly toward the front wall in a radial direction while controlling the circumferential length of the pour to within arcuate increments defined by the reinforcing members 22. After the concrete has set sufficiently, the riser panels 40 can be removed and the nail shanks projecting outwardly of the flanges 38 can simply be cut off and slightly ground, as desired, to provide a neat flush finish. The resultant composite structure, indicated at 72 in FIG. 8, is com prised of cured concrete 74 having embedded therein the reinforcing members 22, wherein the web sections 30 extend to the plane of the treads and to the face of the risers, serving as a control against the propagation of cracks through the concrete structure during its life.

While it will be apparent that the invention herein disclosed is well calculated to achieve the benefits and advantages hereinbefore described, it will be appreciated that the invention is susceptible to modification, variation and change without departing from the spirit thereof.

What is claimed is:

l. A combination form and reinforcing network for concrete tiers comprising a plurality of longitudinally extending reinforcing members disposed in spaced relationship and mounted at an angle corresponding to the desired angle of ascent of the tiers, each said member formed with an upstanding web provided with a saw-toothed configuration comprising a series of substantially horizontal upper edges defining the plane of the treads of the tiers and a series of substantially vertical riser edges defining the plane of the risers of the tiers, mounting means on said web adjacent to said vertical edges for removably securing a riser mold panel thereto which extends transversely between adjacent said reinforcing members, and supporting means on said web for supporting reinforcing rods transversely of said members at a position within the planes of said riser and treads for embedment within and reinforcement of the concrete matrix.

2. The combination defined in claim 1, wherein said web is comprised of a series of substantially triangular sheet metal sections secured to each other.

3. The combination as defined in claim 1, wherein each said reinforcing member comprises a supporting stringer extending for the length of said member and wherein said web is comprised of a series of substantially triangularly shaped sheet metal web sections secured to said stringer at spaced intervals therealong.

4. The combination as defined in claim 2, further including aligning means on each said web section adapted to be disposed in registration with corresponding said aligning means on an adjacent said web section when in assembled relationship assuring accurate repetitive relationship therebetween.

5. The combination as defined in claim 2, wherein each of said sections is formed with a flange along the riser edge thereof defining said mounting means to which said riser panel is adapted to be removably secured.

6. The combination as defined in claim 1, wherein said web is formed with a plurality of apertures therethrough at spaced intervals therealong through which said reinforcing rods are adapted to extend in sup ported relationship providing said supporting means.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1525441 *Mar 26, 1920Feb 10, 1925Donaldson Charles WReenforced-concrete stairs
US1819916 *Feb 19, 1930Aug 18, 1931Murphy Martin EForm
US2052446 *Jul 19, 1934Aug 25, 1936Alban Cannon WillMold for reenforced concrete stadiums
US2489604 *Oct 4, 1946Nov 29, 1949Woods Andrew MDevice for forming concrete steps
US3055146 *Oct 17, 1958Sep 25, 1962Florentino LobatoConcrete stairway
US3331579 *May 5, 1964Jul 18, 1967Petersen Herbert ORiser supports
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6029408 *Feb 3, 1999Feb 29, 2000Cavaness Investment CorporationPre-fabricated step and stairway system
US8112965 *Apr 30, 2008Feb 14, 2012Steve ChmelarAssembly and method for the construction of monolithic tiered concrete slabs
Classifications
U.S. Classification249/14, 52/182, 264/35, 249/85, 249/91, 249/207
International ClassificationE04G13/00, E04G13/06, E04C5/04, E04C5/01
Cooperative ClassificationE04C5/04, E04G13/06
European ClassificationE04C5/04, E04G13/06